Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 60
Filtrar
1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 121(15): e2316662121, 2024 Apr 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38557187

RESUMO

Drug resistance in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) is a pervasive problem that affects the lives of millions of people worldwide. Although records of drug-resistant mutations (DRMs) have been extensively tabulated within public repositories, our understanding of the evolutionary kinetics of DRMs and how they evolve together remains limited. Epistasis, the interaction between a DRM and other residues in HIV-1 protein sequences, is key to the temporal evolution of drug resistance. We use a Potts sequence-covariation statistical-energy model of HIV-1 protein fitness under drug selection pressure, which captures epistatic interactions between all positions, combined with kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations of sequence evolutionary trajectories, to explore the acquisition of DRMs as they arise in an ensemble of drug-naive patient protein sequences. We follow the time course of 52 DRMs in the enzymes protease, RT, and integrase, the primary targets of antiretroviral therapy. The rates at which DRMs emerge are highly correlated with their observed acquisition rates reported in the literature when drug pressure is applied. This result highlights the central role of epistasis in determining the kinetics governing DRM emergence. Whereas rapidly acquired DRMs begin to accumulate as soon as drug pressure is applied, slowly acquired DRMs are contingent on accessory mutations that appear only after prolonged drug pressure. We provide a foundation for using computational methods to determine the temporal evolution of drug resistance using Potts statistical potentials, which can be used to gain mechanistic insights into drug resistance pathways in HIV-1 and other infectious agents.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV , Infecções por HIV , Soropositividade para HIV , HIV-1 , Humanos , HIV-1/genética , Farmacorresistência Viral/genética , Genótipo , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/genética , Mutação , Fármacos Anti-HIV/farmacologia , Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico
2.
bioRxiv ; 2024 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38328132

RESUMO

Integrase (IN) performs dual essential roles during HIV-1 replication. During ingress, IN functions within an oligomeric "intasome" assembly to catalyze viral DNA integration into host chromatin. During late stages of infection, tetrameric IN binds viral RNA and orchestrates the condensation of ribonucleoprotein complexes into the capsid core. The molecular architectures of HIV-1 IN assemblies that mediate these distinct events remain unknown. Furthermore, the tetramer is an important antiviral target for allosteric IN inhibitors. Here, we determined cryo-EM structures of wildtype HIV-1 IN tetramers and intasome hexadecamers. Our structures unveil a remarkable plasticity that leverages IN C-terminal domains and abutting linkers to assemble functionally distinct oligomeric forms. Alteration of a newly recognized conserved interface revealed that both IN functions track with tetramerization in vitro and during HIV-1 infection. Collectively, our findings reveal how IN plasticity orchestrates its diverse molecular functions, suggest a working model for IN-viral RNA binding, and provide atomic blueprints for allosteric IN inhibitor development.

3.
Viruses ; 16(1)2024 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38257776

RESUMO

The first- and second-generation clinically used HIV-1 integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are key components of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which work by blocking the integration step in the HIV-1 replication cycle that is catalyzed by a nucleoprotein assembly called an intasome. However, resistance to even the latest clinically used INSTIs is beginning to emerge. Developmental third-generation INSTIs, based on naphthyridine scaffolds, are promising candidates to combat drug-resistant viral variants. Among these novel INSTIs, compound 4f exhibits two distinct conformations when binding with intasomes from HIV-1 and the closely related prototype foamy virus (PFV) despite the high structural similarity of their INSTI binding pockets. The molecular mechanism and the key active site residues responsible for these differing binding modes in closely related intasomes remain elusive. To unravel the molecular determinants governing the two distinct binding modes, we applied a novel molecular dynamics-based free energy method that utilizes alchemical pathways to overcome the sampling challenges associated with transitioning between the two bound conformations of ligand 4f within the crowded environments of the INSTI binding pockets in these intasomes. The calculated conformational free energies successfully recapitulate the experimentally observed binding mode preferences in the two viral intasomes. Analysis of the simulated structures suggests that the observed binding mode preferences are caused by amino acid residue differences in both the front and the central catalytic sub-pocket of the INSTI binding site in HIV-1 and PFV. Additional free energy calculations on mutants of HIV-1 and PFV revealed that while both sub-pockets contribute to binding mode selection, the central sub-pocket plays a more important role. These results highlight the importance of both side chain and solvent reorganization, as well as the conformational entropy in determining the ligand binding mode, and will help inform the development of more effective INSTIs for combatting drug-resistant viral variants.


Assuntos
Integrase de HIV , Soropositividade para HIV , HIV-1 , Humanos , Ligantes , Sítios de Ligação , Catálise , Integrase de HIV/genética , HIV-1/genética
4.
Nat Commun ; 15(1): 389, 2024 Jan 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38195598

RESUMO

Structural biology efforts using cryogenic electron microscopy are frequently stifled by specimens adopting "preferred orientations" on grids, leading to anisotropic map resolution and impeding structure determination. Tilting the specimen stage during data collection is a generalizable solution but has historically led to substantial resolution attenuation. Here, we develop updated data collection and image processing workflows and demonstrate, using multiple specimens, that resolution attenuation is negligible or significantly reduced across tilt angles. Reconstructions with and without the stage tilted as high as 60° are virtually indistinguishable. These strategies allowed the reconstruction to 3 Å resolution of a bacterial RNA polymerase with preferred orientation, containing an unnatural nucleotide for studying novel base pair recognition. Furthermore, we present a quantitative framework that allows cryo-EM practitioners to define an optimal tilt angle during data acquisition. These results reinforce the utility of employing stage tilt for data collection and provide quantitative metrics to obtain isotropic maps.


Assuntos
Benchmarking , Sistemas Computacionais , Microscopia Crioeletrônica , Anisotropia , Coleta de Dados
5.
Nat Struct Mol Biol ; 31(1): 179-189, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38057551

RESUMO

Branching is a critical step in RNA splicing that is essential for 5' splice site selection. Recent spliceosome structures have led to competing models for the recognition of the invariant adenosine at the branch point. However, there are no structures of any splicing complex with the adenosine nucleophile docked in the active site and positioned to attack the 5' splice site. Thus we lack a mechanistic understanding of adenosine selection and splice site recognition during RNA splicing. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of a group II intron that reveals that active site dynamics are coupled to the formation of a base triple within the branch-site helix that positions the 2'-OH of the adenosine for nucleophilic attack on the 5' scissile phosphate. This structure, complemented with biochemistry and comparative analyses to splicing complexes, supports a base triple model of adenosine recognition for branching within group II introns and the evolutionarily related spliceosome.


Assuntos
Sítios de Splice de RNA , Splicing de RNA , Microscopia Crioeletrônica , Spliceossomos/metabolismo , Íntrons , Adenosina/química , Precursores de RNA/metabolismo , Conformação de Ácido Nucleico
6.
bioRxiv ; 2023 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38077045

RESUMO

The first and second-generation clinically used HIV-1 integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are key components of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which work by blocking the integration step in the HIV-1 replication cycle that is catalyzed by a nucleoprotein assembly called an intasome. However, resistance to even the latest clinically used INSTIs is beginning to emerge. Developmental third-generation INSTIs, based on naphthyridine scaffold, are promising candidates to combat drug-resistant viral variants. Among these novel INSTIs, compound 4f exhibits two distinct conformations when binding to intasomes from HIV-1 and the closely related prototype foamy virus (PFV), despite the high structural similarity of their INSTI binding pockets. The molecular mechanism and the key active site residues responsible for these differing binding modes in closely related intasomes remain elusive. To unravel the molecular determinants governing the two distinct binding modes, we employ a novel molecular dynamics-based free energy approach that utilizes alchemical pathways to overcome the sampling challenges associated with transitioning between two ligand conformations within crowded environments along physical pathways. The calculated conformational free energies successfully recapitulate the experimentally observed binding mode preferences in the two viral intasomes. Analysis of the simulated structures suggests that the observed binding mode preferences are caused by amino acid residue differences in both the front and the central catalytic sub-pocket of the INSTI binding site in HIV-1 and PFV. Additional free energy calculations on mutants of HIV-1 and PFV revealed that while both sub-pockets contribute to the binding mode selection, the central sub-pocket plays a more important role. These results highlight the importance of both side chain and solvent reorganization, as well as the conformational entropy in determining the ligand binding mode and will help inform the development of more effective INSTIs for combatting drug-resistant viral variants.

7.
Nat Commun ; 14(1): 8219, 2023 Dec 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38086811

RESUMO

Artificially Expanded Genetic Information Systems (AEGIS) add independently replicable unnatural nucleotide pairs to the natural G:C and A:T/U pairs found in native DNA, joining the unnatural pairs through alternative modes of hydrogen bonding. Whether and how AEGIS pairs are recognized and processed by multi-subunit cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs) remains unknown. Here, we show that E. coli RNAP selectively recognizes unnatural nucleobases in a six-letter expanded genetic system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of three RNAP elongation complexes containing template-substrate UBPs reveal the shared principles behind the recognition of AEGIS and natural base pairs. In these structures, RNAPs are captured in an active state, poised to perform the chemistry step. At this point, the unnatural base pair adopts a Watson-Crick geometry, and the trigger loop is folded into an active conformation, indicating that the mechanistic principles underlying recognition and incorporation of natural base pairs also apply to AEGIS unnatural base pairs. These data validate the design philosophy of AEGIS unnatural basepairs. Further, we provide structural evidence supporting a long-standing hypothesis that pair mismatch during transcription occurs via tautomerization. Together, our work highlights the importance of Watson-Crick complementarity underlying the design principles of AEGIS base pair recognition.


Assuntos
DNA , Escherichia coli , Escherichia coli/genética , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , DNA/metabolismo , Pareamento de Bases , Nucleotídeos/química , Ligação de Hidrogênio
8.
Nat Commun ; 14(1): 5220, 2023 08 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37633970

RESUMO

Assembly of ribosomes in bacteria is highly efficient, taking ~2-3 min, but this makes the abundance of assembly intermediates very low, which is a challenge for mechanistic understanding. Genetic perturbations of the assembly process create bottlenecks where intermediates accumulate, facilitating structural characterization. We use cryo-electron microscopy, with iterative subclassification to identify intermediates in the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit from E. coli. The analysis of the ensemble of intermediates that spans the entire biogenesis pathway for the 50 S subunit was facilitated by a dimensionality reduction and cluster picking approach using PCA-UMAP-HDBSCAN. The identity of the cooperative folding units in the RNA with associated proteins is revealed, and the hierarchy of these units reveals a complete assembly map for all RNA and protein components. The assembly generally proceeds co-transcriptionally, with some flexibility in the landscape to ensure efficiency for this central cellular process under a variety of growth conditions.


Assuntos
Escherichia coli , Subunidades Ribossômicas Maiores de Bactérias , Microscopia Crioeletrônica , Escherichia coli/genética , Bactérias , RNA
11.
bioRxiv ; 2023 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37503021

RESUMO

Structural biology efforts using cryogenic electron microscopy are frequently stifled by specimens adopting "preferred orientations" on grids, leading to anisotropic map resolution and impeding structure determination. Tilting the specimen stage during data collection is a generalizable solution but has historically led to substantial resolution attenuation. Here, we develop updated data collection and image processing workflows and demonstrate, using multiple specimens, that resolution attenuation is negligible or significantly reduced across tilt angles. Reconstructions with and without the stage tilted as high as 60° are virtually indistinguishable. These strategies allowed the reconstruction to 3 Å resolution of a bacterial RNA polymerase with preferred orientation. Furthermore, we present a quantitative framework that allows cryo-EM practitioners to define an optimal tilt angle for dataset acquisition. These data reinforce the utility of employing stage tilt for data collection and provide quantitative metrics to obtain isotropic maps.

12.
Sci Adv ; 9(29): eadg5953, 2023 07 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37478179

RESUMO

HIV-1 infection depends on the integration of viral DNA into host chromatin. Integration is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase and is blocked by integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), first-line antiretroviral therapeutics widely used in the clinic. Resistance to even the best INSTIs is a problem, and the mechanisms of resistance are poorly understood. Here, we analyze combinations of the mutations E138K, G140A/S, and Q148H/K/R, which confer resistance to INSTIs. The investigational drug 4d more effectively inhibited the mutants compared with the approved drug Dolutegravir (DTG). We present 11 new cryo-EM structures of drug-resistant HIV-1 intasomes bound to DTG or 4d, with better than 3-Å resolution. These structures, complemented with free energy simulations, virology, and enzymology, explain the mechanisms of DTG resistance involving E138K + G140A/S + Q148H/K/R and show why 4d maintains potency better than DTG. These data establish a foundation for further development of INSTIs that potently inhibit resistant forms in integrase.


Assuntos
Inibidores de Integrase de HIV , Integrase de HIV , Inibidores de Integrase de HIV/farmacologia , Inibidores de Integrase de HIV/química , Oxazinas/farmacologia , Mutação , Integrase de HIV/genética , Integrase de HIV/química , Integrase de HIV/metabolismo
13.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 51(6): 2862-2876, 2023 04 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36864669

RESUMO

Understanding the assembly principles of biological macromolecular complexes remains a significant challenge, due to the complexity of the systems and the difficulties in developing experimental approaches. As a ribonucleoprotein complex, the ribosome serves as a model system for the profiling of macromolecular complex assembly. In this work, we report an ensemble of large ribosomal subunit intermediate structures that accumulate during synthesis in a near-physiological and co-transcriptional in vitro reconstitution system. Thirteen pre-50S intermediate maps covering the entire assembly process were resolved using cryo-EM single-particle analysis and heterogeneous subclassification. Segmentation of the set of density maps reveals that the 50S ribosome intermediates assemble based on fourteen cooperative assembly blocks, including the smallest assembly core reported to date, which is composed of a 600-nucleotide-long folded rRNA and three ribosomal proteins. The cooperative blocks assemble onto the assembly core following defined dependencies, revealing the parallel pathways at both early and late assembly stages of the 50S subunit.


Assuntos
RNA Ribossômico , Ribossomos , Ribossomos/genética , Ribossomos/metabolismo , RNA Ribossômico/metabolismo , Proteínas Ribossômicas/metabolismo , Subunidades Ribossômicas Maiores/metabolismo
14.
Biochem Soc Trans ; 50(6): 1703-1714, 2022 12 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36398769

RESUMO

Filament formation by metabolic, biosynthetic, and other enzymes has recently come into focus as a mechanism to fine-tune enzyme activity in the cell. Filamentation is key to the function of SgrAI, a sequence-specific DNA endonuclease that has served as a model system to provide some of the deepest insights into the biophysical characteristics of filamentation and its functional consequences. Structure-function analyses reveal that, in the filamentous state, SgrAI stabilizes an activated enzyme conformation that leads to accelerated DNA cleavage activity and expanded DNA sequence specificity. The latter is thought to be mediated by sequence-specific DNA structure, protein-DNA interactions, and a disorder-to-order transition in the protein, which collectively affect the relative stabilities of the inactive, non-filamentous conformation and the active, filamentous conformation of SgrAI bound to DNA. Full global kinetic modeling of the DNA cleavage pathway reveals a slow, rate-limiting, second-order association rate constant for filament assembly, and simulations of in vivo activity predict that filamentation is superior to non-filamenting mechanisms in ensuring rapid activation and sequestration of SgrAI's DNA cleavage activity on phage DNA and away from the host chromosome. In vivo studies demonstrate the critical requirement for accelerated DNA cleavage by SgrAI in its biological role to safeguard the bacterial host. Collectively, these data have advanced our understanding of how filamentation can regulate enzyme structure and function, while the experimental strategies used for SgrAI can be applied to other enzymatic systems to identify novel functional roles for filamentation.


Assuntos
DNA , Sequência de Bases , Especificidade por Substrato , Regulação Alostérica , Multimerização Proteica , DNA/química
15.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(15): 8898-8918, 2022 08 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35947647

RESUMO

Integration into host target DNA (tDNA), a hallmark of retroviral replication, is mediated by the intasome, a multimer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA (vDNA) ends. To ascertain aspects of tDNA recognition during integration, we have solved the 3.5 Å resolution cryo-EM structure of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) strand transfer complex (STC) intasome. The tDNA adopts an A-like conformation in the region encompassing the sites of vDNA joining, which exposes the sugar-phosphate backbone for IN-mediated strand transfer. Examination of existing retroviral STC structures revealed conservation of A-form tDNA in the analogous regions of these complexes. Furthermore, analyses of sequence preferences in genomic integration sites selectively targeted by six different retroviruses highlighted consistent propensity for A-philic sequences at the sites of vDNA joining. Our structure additionally revealed several novel MMTV IN-DNA interactions, as well as contacts seen in prior STC structures, including conserved Pro125 and Tyr149 residues interacting with tDNA. In infected cells, Pro125 substitutions impacted the global pattern of MMTV integration without significantly altering local base sequence preferences at vDNA insertion sites. Collectively, these data advance our understanding of retroviral intasome structure and function, as well as factors that influence patterns of vDNA integration in genomic DNA.


Assuntos
Integrases , Integração Viral , Animais , Camundongos , Integrases/metabolismo , Retroviridae/genética , Retroviridae/metabolismo , DNA Viral/genética , DNA Viral/química , Conformação Molecular , Vírus do Tumor Mamário do Camundongo/genética , Vírus do Tumor Mamário do Camundongo/metabolismo
16.
J Vis Exp ; (185)2022 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35848829

RESUMO

Single-particle analysis (SPA) by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is now a mainstream technique for high-resolution structural biology. Structure determination by SPA relies upon obtaining multiple distinct views of a macromolecular object vitrified within a thin layer of ice. Ideally, a collection of uniformly distributed random projection orientations would amount to all possible views of the object, giving rise to reconstructions characterized by isotropic directional resolution. However, in reality, many samples suffer from preferentially oriented particles adhering to the air-water interface. This leads to non-uniform angular orientation distributions in the dataset and inhomogeneous Fourier-space sampling in the reconstruction, translating into maps characterized by anisotropic resolution. Tilting the specimen stage provides a generalizable solution to overcoming resolution anisotropy by virtue of improving the uniformity of orientation distributions, and thus the isotropy of Fourier space sampling. The present protocol describes a tilted-stage automated data collection strategy using Leginon, a software for automated image acquisition. The procedure is simple to implement, does not require any additional equipment or software, and is compatible with most standard transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) used for imaging biological macromolecules.


Assuntos
Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador , Software , Anisotropia , Microscopia Crioeletrônica/métodos , Coleta de Dados , Substâncias Macromoleculares/química
17.
Sci Adv ; 8(27): eabn9874, 2022 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35857464

RESUMO

Key proteins of retroviruses and other RNA viruses are translated and subsequently processed from polyprotein precursors by the viral protease (PR). Processing of the HIV Gag-Pol polyprotein yields the HIV structural proteins and enzymes. Structures of the mature enzymes PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) aided understanding of catalysis and design of antiretrovirals, but knowledge of the Pol precursor architecture and function before PR cleavage is limited. We developed a system to produce stable HIV-1 Pol and determined its cryo-electron microscopy structure. RT in Pol has a similar arrangement to the mature RT heterodimer, and its dimerization may draw together two PR monomers to activate proteolytic processing. HIV-1 thus may leverage the dimerization interfaces in Pol to regulate assembly and maturation of polyprotein precursors.

18.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 2416, 2022 05 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35504909

RESUMO

A multimer of retroviral integrase (IN) synapses viral DNA ends within a stable intasome nucleoprotein complex for integration into a host cell genome. Reconstitution of the intasome from the maedi-visna virus (MVV), an ovine lentivirus, revealed a large assembly containing sixteen IN subunits1. Herein, we report cryo-EM structures of the lentiviral intasome prior to engagement of target DNA and following strand transfer, refined at 3.4 and 3.5 Å resolution, respectively. The structures elucidate details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces involved in lentiviral intasome formation. We show that the homomeric interfaces involved in IN hexadecamer formation and the α-helical configuration of the linker connecting the C-terminal and catalytic core domains are critical for MVV IN strand transfer activity in vitro and for virus infectivity. Single-molecule microscopy in conjunction with photobleaching reveals that the MVV intasome can bind a variable number, up to sixteen molecules, of the lentivirus-specific host factor LEDGF/p75. Concordantly, ablation of endogenous LEDGF/p75 results in gross redistribution of MVV integration sites in human and ovine cells. Our data confirm the importance of the expanded architecture observed in cryo-EM studies of lentiviral intasomes and suggest that this organization underlies multivalent interactions with chromatin for integration targeting to active genes.


Assuntos
DNA Viral , Integrases , Animais , Humanos , Domínio Catalítico , DNA Viral/metabolismo , Integrases/metabolismo , Lentivirus/genética , Lentivirus/metabolismo , Modelos Moleculares , Retroviridae/genética , Ovinos/genética , Integração Viral
19.
J Biol Chem ; 298(4): 101760, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35202658

RESUMO

Enzyme filamentation is a widespread phenomenon that mediates enzyme regulation and function. For the filament-forming sequence-specific DNA endonuclease SgrAI, the process of filamentation both accelerates its DNA cleavage activity and expands its DNA sequence specificity, thus allowing for many additional DNA sequences to be rapidly cleaved. Both outcomes-the acceleration of DNA cleavage and the expansion of sequence specificity-are proposed to regulate critical processes in bacterial innate immunity. However, the mechanistic bases underlying these events remain unclear. Herein, we describe two new structures of the SgrAI enzyme that shed light on its catalytic function. First, we present the cryo-EM structure of filamentous SgrAI bound to intact primary site DNA and Ca2+ resolved to ∼2.5 Å within the catalytic center, which represents the trapped enzyme-DNA complex prior to the DNA cleavage reaction. This structure reveals important conformational changes that contribute to the catalytic mechanism and the binding of a second divalent cation in the enzyme active site, which is expected to contribute to increased DNA cleavage activity of SgrAI in the filamentous state. Second, we present an X-ray crystal structure of DNA-free (apo) SgrAI resolved to 2.0 Å resolution, which reveals a disordered loop involved in DNA recognition. Collectively, these multiple new observations clarify the mechanism of expansion of DNA sequence specificity of SgrAI, including the indirect readout of sequence-dependent DNA structure, changes in protein-DNA interactions, and the disorder-to-order transition of a crucial DNA recognition element.


Assuntos
Clivagem do DNA , Desoxirribonucleases de Sítio Específico do Tipo II , Regulação Alostérica , Sítios de Ligação , Desoxirribonucleases de Sítio Específico do Tipo II/química , Especificidade por Substrato
20.
Structure ; 30(4): 498-509.e4, 2022 04 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34990602

RESUMO

Single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) offers a unique opportunity to characterize macromolecular structural heterogeneity by virtue of its ability to place distinct particle populations into different groups through computational classification. However, there is a dearth of tools for surveying the heterogeneity landscape, quantitatively analyzing heterogeneous particle populations after classification, deciding how many unique classes are represented by the data, and accurately cross-comparing reconstructions. Here, we develop a workflow that contains discovery and analysis modules to quantitatively mine cryo-EM data for sets of structures with maximal diversity. This workflow was applied to a dataset of E. coli 50S ribosome assembly intermediates, which are characterized by significant structural heterogeneity. We identified more detailed branchpoints in the assembly process and characterized the interactions of an assembly factor with immature intermediates. While the tools described here were developed for ribosome assembly, they should be broadly applicable to the analysis of other heterogeneous cryo-EM datasets.


Assuntos
Escherichia coli , Ribossomos , Microscopia Crioeletrônica , Escherichia coli/química , Escherichia coli/genética , Substâncias Macromoleculares/química , Ribossomos/química
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...