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1.
Ther Adv Vaccines Immunother ; 12: 25151355241249607, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38726045

RESUMO

Background: Immunization is one of the most significant health initiatives of recent times. Despite this, vaccine hesitancy is increasing and was listed as one of the top 10 threats to global health by the World Health Organization in 2019. A major factor associated with vaccine hesitancy is thought to be the viral spread of misinformation by a small but active anti-vaccination movement. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the influences of social media on vaccine decision-making in parents. Design: This study is part of a larger body of research that explored vaccine decision-making in parents. Other methods included were an online survey and semi-structured interviews. This study investigated the influence of cyberculture on parents in an online environment. Method: This study employed netnography, a form of qualitative inquiry with its roots in ethnography as methodology and a purpose-designed Facebook page as the means of exploring a purpose-designed online community with a particular focus on the culture, belief systems and influences present. Both manual and computer-assisted thematic analyses were used to analyse the data obtained. Results: Three key themes were identified in this study. These included vaccine safety concerns, the emotional debate and COVID-19-specific issues. The results indicated the presence of strong anti-vaccination sentiment combined with an 'infodemic' of conspiracy theories, misinformation and vitriol with the potential to negatively impact parents seeking immunization information. Conclusion: Given the popularity and accessibility of social media and the ready access to misinformation present online, it is evident that parental vaccine decision-making may be impacted adversely. Therefore, it is important that healthcare professionals are aware of this and provide adequate and timely education prior to parents seeking information on social media.


Exploring the influence of social media on vaccine decision-making in parents: a netnography This research explored the impact of Facebook interactions on the vaccine decision-making of parents.

2.
Trauma Violence Abuse ; : 15248380231221279, 2024 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281156

RESUMO

Health and allied health professionals are uniquely positioned to collaborate in prevention, early intervention and responses to child maltreatment. Effective collaboration requires comprehensive interprofessional education (IPE), and inadequate collaboration across sectors and professions continually contributes to poor outcomes for children. Little is known about what interprofessional preparation health and allied health professionals receive before initial qualification (preservice) that equips them for interprofessional collaboration and provision of culturally safe care in child protection. This scoping review aimed to identify what is known internationally about IPE in child protection for preservice health and allied health professionals. Thirteen manuscripts reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Key characteristics of the educational interventions are presented, including target disciplines, core content and their learning objectives and activities. Findings demonstrated primarily low-quality methodologies and educational interventions that had not been replicated beyond their initial context. Many educational interventions did not provide comprehensive content covering the spectrum of prevention, early intervention and responses for all types of child maltreatment, and/or did not clearly indicate how IPE was achieved. Key challenges to delivering comprehensive interprofessional child protection include lack of institutional support and competing priorities across disciplines who must meet requirements of separate regulatory bodies. Consequently, there is a need for further development and robust evaluation of educational interventions to explore how interprofessional collaborative skills for child protection can be developed and delivered in preservice health and allied health professional education.

3.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(11): 4207-4217, 2023 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37464735

RESUMO

AIM: The aim of this paper is to critically reflect on our team's experience of using netnography to explore vaccine-hesitant parents and pregnant women, a group who have traditionally been difficult to recruit to research studies and a methodology that is underutilized in nursing research. DESIGN: This paper takes the form of a discussion paper that will utilize data obtained from a qualitative netnographic study. Relevant literature was searched including 2015-2023. METHOD: This paper utilized data obtained from a qualitative study that used netnography as methodology and an online minable data source. Netnography is a relatively new methodology that uses the online environment to explore digital cultures and study networked society. It pays particular attention to cultural insights and conditions that impact the human experience. This methodology is particularly relevant to nursing research which is often humanistic and always conducted to ensure optimal patient outcomes. RESULTS: Using netnography for the first time has resulted in four main insights. These include the adaptability of the process; the creativity involved in designing the site; the ready acceptance of the site by participants and the co-creation knowledge that resulted. CONCLUSIONS: Netnography is a creative methodology that was successful in accessing and engaging the vaccine-hesitant community, a group who are often marginalized. Netnography has the advantage of using a platform that is familiar and safe for many people and provides access to an extensive minable data source.


Assuntos
Pesquisa em Enfermagem , Mídias Sociais , Vacinas , Humanos , Feminino , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Pais
4.
Compr Child Adolesc Nurs ; 46(4): 262-276, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37318539

RESUMO

Vaccine hesitancy has been described as any delay or refusal of vaccines despite their availability and is increasing in Australia and other middle to high-income countries. The aim of this study is to gain a deep understanding of the experiences and influences on vaccine hesitant children and their families. A qualitative interview approach was undertaken with vaccine hesitant parents and pregnant women (n = 12). Semi-structured interviews were conducted by telephone. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken on data obtained using the guidelines of Braun and Clarke. Three main themes were identified in this study, including Pushed to the fringe; A culture of Distrust; and Coerced choices. The study revealed that vaccine hesitant parents felt isolated and pushed to the fringe of society. They also expressed dissatisfaction with the Australian "No Jab - No Pay" and "No Jab - No Play" legislation. This contributed to feelings of marginalization. Participants also cited a breakdown in the therapeutic relationships, which impacted their child's health. Additionally, a lack of sufficient information was received to achieve informed consent. These results suggest that there is a need for enhanced education for some health-care professionals, many of whom have reported being confronted by conversations with vaccine hesitant parents.


Assuntos
Vacinação , Vacinas , Humanos , Criança , Feminino , Gravidez , Hesitação Vacinal , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde , Austrália
5.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 132, 2022 Dec 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36510198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Aboriginal women and their infants experience significant disadvantage in health outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Access to timely, effective, and appropriate maternal and child health care can contribute to reducing these existing health disparities. This research sought to explore factors that contribute to continuity of care for Aboriginal women and their infants living in metropolitan South Australia. This paper reports on the perspectives of health care workers in mainstream health services from the antenatal period to the end of an infants' second birthday. It explores health workers' perspectives of what contributes to positive care experiences and satisfaction with care provided to Aboriginal women and their infants in mainstream health. METHODS: Eight focus groups were held with 52 health professionals. Participants included Aboriginal Cultural Child and Family Support Consultants (n = 7), Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care Workers (n = 3), Midwives (n = 3) and Child and Family Nurses (n = 39). Data was inductively coded and thematically analysed. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged: the system takes priority, culture is not central in approaches to care, and 'we've got to be allowed to do it in a different way'. CONCLUSIONS: This research highlights a lack of continuity of care for Aboriginal families accessing mainstream health services from the antenatal period through to an infants' first 1000 days of life. This research has implications for communities, and it calls for strategies to enhance continuity, and healthcare services to provide appropriate and culturally safe care. Findings will inform and guide future changes to improve continuity of care for Aboriginal families and infants in the first 1000 days.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Serviços de Saúde Materna , Tocologia , Lactente , Criança , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Pessoal de Saúde
6.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 23: e16, 2022 03 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35307050

RESUMO

AIM: This article documents the impact of a Nurse Practitioner-led primary health service for disadvantaged children living in housing instability or homelessness. It identifies that First Nations children miss out on essential primary care, particularly immunisation, but have less severe health conditions than non-First Nations children living in housing insecurity. BACKGROUND: Health services for homeless populations focus on the 11% of rough sleepers, little is done for the 22% of children in Australia living in housing instability; many of whom are from First Nations families. Little is known of the health status of these children or their connections to appropriate primary health care. METHODS: This research implemented an innovative model of extended health care delivery, embedding a Nurse Practitioner in a homeless service to work with families providing health assessments and referrals, using clinically validated assessment tools. This article reports on proof of concept findings on the service that measured immunisation rates, developmental, medical, dental and mental health needs of children, particularly First Nations children, using a three-point severity level scale with Level 3 being the most severe and in need of immediate referral to a specialist medical service. FINDINGS: Forty-three children were referred by the service to the Nurse Practitioner over a 6-month period, with nine identifying as First Nations children. Differences in severity levels between First Nations/non-First Nations children were Level 1, First Nations/non-First Nations 0/15%; Level 2, 10/17%; and Level 3, 45/29%. Forty-five percent of First Nations children had no health problems, as compared to 29% on non-First Nations children. Immunisation rates were low for both cohorts. No First Nations child was immunised and only 9% of the non-First Nations children. While numbers for both cohorts are too low for valid statistical analysis, the lower levels of severity for First Nations children suggest stronger extended family support and the positive impact of cultural norms of reciprocity.


Assuntos
Habitação , Profissionais de Enfermagem , Criança , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde
8.
Women Birth ; 35(6): 547-552, 2022 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35190295

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Immunisation is universally accepted as one of the most significant health initiatives in recent times. However, vaccine hesitancy is increasing in Australia and other high- and middle-income countries. There is evidence to suggest that many parents, even those who elect to immunise, may have a degree of vaccine hesitancy. The recommendation of a healthcare professional is a predictor for vaccine uptake. AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore the values, beliefs and choices made by vaccine hesitant parents and pregnant women, regarding their decision not to vaccinate their child or children. The aim being to determine the factors that influence this decision making and to give a voice to vaccine hesitant parents. METHODS: A qualitative exploratory online survey of 106 vaccine hesitant parents and pregnant women was conducted in 2021. The survey utilised closed and open-ended questions. FINDINGS: Pregnant women and parents obtained most of their immunisation education from nurses, midwives, and general practitioners. Vaccine decision-making was however, influenced by multiple factors including vaccine safety concerns, the sources of information accessed, and a previous negative immunisation experience. Other influential factors included the use of alternative therapies, diet, and lifestyle factors. DISCUSSION: Along with general practitioners, nurses and midwives are a popular, respected and a vital source in the provision of accurate and timely immunisation education. However, further education is required at an undergraduate level to adequately prepare them for their role of listening to and educating vaccine hesitant pregnant women and parents.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisões , Pais , Gestantes , Vacinação , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Poder Familiar , Pais/psicologia , Vacinação/psicologia , Vacinas/efeitos adversos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Austrália , Gestantes/psicologia , Hesitação Vacinal/psicologia
9.
Health Soc Care Community ; 30(5): e2236-e2244, 2022 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34843139

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to (a) investigate community women's knowledge and experiences of women's health community services in northern rural and regional New South Wales, Australia; (b) identify any existing gaps in community women's health programs in this region and (c) to contribute to service provision, strategic planning, and industry professional development of community nurse researchers in collaboration with industry. The research took place in Northern New South Wales Local Health District (NNSWLHD) Australia, which is comprised of Tweed/Byron, Richmond and Clarence Health Service Groups, during May to September 2019. Participants comprised 13 women's health service clients over the age of 18 years and less than 74 years, attending health services clinics within NNSWLHD. The research was undertaken as a partnership between three senior healthcare professionals (Clinical Nurse Consultants), one from each Health Service Group, and academic researchers, who provided the key senior healthcare professionals with research training and guidance. Key themes related to primary healthcare experiences and needs of women living in NNSWLHD, and the quality of women's primary healthcare services in that region. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes and several sub-themes. These were (1) Knowledge and Awareness of Services, (2) Barriers to Access, (3) Personal Issues and (4) A Need for Women-Centred Care. The major issues women experienced were deficits in services, lengthy wait times and poor access. Additional funding is necessary to uphold community women's health nurse positions in rural health to improve women's health outcomes in these locations.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Saúde da Mulher , Adulto , Austrália , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , População Rural
10.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 36(1): 275-284, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33942357

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The Indigenous people of Norway are legally entitled to use their Sámi language in encounters with healthcare services, yet these encounters are generally conducted in Norwegian language. The right to Sámi language and culture in health is particularly relegated when Sámi healthcare personnel is not present. This neglect of Sámi language and culture in the Norwegian healthcare system impacts on the quality of care Sámi patients receive. AIM: This paper describes and interprets healthcare interactions between nurses and Sámi-speaking patients in Norway. METHOD: Qualitative semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with Sámi (n = 13) and Norwegian nurses (n = 10). Participants were included if they had experience working with Sámi-speaking patients and two years clinical practice in the Sámi area of northern Norway. Interpretive and descriptive analyses were conducted. FINDINGS: Obtaining only basic patient information and lack of mapping of native language in admission documents or patient notes makes it challenging to recognise Sámi patients. In encounters with Sámi patients, Norwegian nurses must navigate linguistic challenges with an additional layer of interplay between culture and care. Misunderstandings in this area can undermine patient safety and be directly contrary to health legislation and patient rights. As remedy, Sámi nurses often improve the nurse-patient dialogue by translating and explaining cultural nuances, thus improving understanding of healthcare interactions, and bridging the gap to the Norwegian staff. CONCLUSION: To integrate Sámi language and culture into nursing care new guidelines to implement knowledge of Sámi patients' culture and language rights in healthcare education is needed. In addition, the authorities have to facilitate implementation of laws and regulations, research and guidelines in practical health care. At last, the number of Sámi-speaking nurses has to increase.


Assuntos
Atenção à Saúde , Idioma , Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Noruega , Tradução
11.
Health Soc Care Community ; 30(5): e2088-e2096, 2022 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34783095

RESUMO

This article explores the understanding of community to families living in insecure housing in one Australian state during the COVID-19 pandemic. Five female-headed families were interviewed during the pandemic and asked to identify what community meant to them. All participants were referred by an agency caring for families experiencing homelessness or housing insecurity. Community was defined using Bourdieu's concept of social capital, allowing for both bonding and bridging relationships to be explored. Bonding relationships refer to close emotional ties with family and friends, while bridging ties establish networks that provide individuals with access to resources. Two themes emerged that shed light on how community is understood during times of crisis: The first suggests that for families experiencing housing insecurity, particularly women escaping family violence, their links with community were primarily maintained by welfare and church agencies. These organisations provided bridging social capital during the pandemic that allowed the women and their children to cope with the isolation and to maximise opportunities. The second themes point to traditional notions of community as family and geographical space. Here the findings are mixed. Resources provided by government, and mediated through the welfare agency, allowed these families to create a safe and comfortable space. However, for First Nations women, the lockdown meant that it was difficult to maintain community obligations, while children who appeared to identify community with attendance at school found the lockdown confusing because of the disruption to their normal social space.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pessoas Mal Alojadas , Austrália/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Família/psicologia , Feminino , Habitação , Instabilidade Habitacional , Humanos , Pandemias
12.
Int J Nurs Stud Adv ; 4: 100062, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38745627

RESUMO

Objectives: : Vaccine refusal is increasing in Australia and is a major concern in high- and middle-income countries. There is evidence to suggest that some parents, even those who elect to immunise, may be vaccine hesitant with some manipulating the schedule by excluding or delaying some vaccines. The aim of this review was to gain an understanding of factors that influence vaccine decision-making in pregnant women and parents of children. Design: : An integrative review approach was used to produce an analysis of existing literature on vaccine decision-making in pregnancy and parents. As the broadest of review methods, an integrative review can include a range of experimental and non-experimental research, thereby ensuring the inclusion of data from multiple perspectives. Data Sources: : Online databases were searched for research related to vaccine decision-making in pregnant women and parents. Original and review articles were sought that were published in English between 2015 and 2021. Reviewed articles included qualitative and quantitative studies and systematic reviews. No mixed methods papers were located or excluded from this review. Review methods: : The review method was an integrative review informed by Coughlan. Results: : Papers from thirteen predominantly high- and middle-income countries were selected for this review. A total of 31 articles fit the inclusion/exclusion criteria, including qualitative, quantitative and review articles. Three main themes were identified including the role of healthcare professionals, vaccine safety concerns and alternative influences. Alternative influences included: social media, friends and family, religion, conspiracy theories and salutogenic parenting. Findings suggest that high levels of anxiety are involved in vaccine decision-making with parents seeking information from multiple sources including healthcare professionals, friends and family and social media. Conclusions: : Pregnancy is an ideal time to provide education on both pregnancy and childhood vaccinations. However, some parents reported dissatisfaction in their therapeutic relationships with healthcare professionals. As a result, parents can resort to their own information seeking, in the main via social media which has been linked to vaccine refusal. Additionally, some healthcare professionals report feeling inadequately prepared for the role of immunisation promotion and provision. Parental information seeking from non-traditional sources has been shown to result in the acquisition of misinformation, exposure to conspiracy theories, the inevitable loss of vaccine confidence and subsequent vaccine refusal.

13.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 80(1): 1948246, 2021 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34210235

RESUMO

Sámi people report less satisfaction with healthcare services than the majority population in Norway, and report that they seldom encounter culturally adapted health services. This study investigates Sámi and Norwegian nurses' perspectives on culturally respectful and appropriate caring for Sámi patients in northern Norway. Six focus groups were conducted: three with Sámi-speaking nurses (n = 13) and three with Norwegian-speaking nurses (n = 10). Data were collected and analysed in line with Thorne's interpretive descriptive methodology. Three overarching themes emerged from the interviews: (i) the importance nurses gave to establishing a connection and building trust with Sámi patients; (ii) nurses' perceptions that in comparison to Norwegian patients Sámi patients could be less confrontational and direct, but that differences weren't always apparent and (iii) the importance nurses described to understanding the cultural context of their Sámi patients. This study showed that Sámi and Norwegian nurses working in northern Norway were largely perceptive about and respectful of cultural differences between Sámi and Norwegian patients. Some emphasised, though, that Sámi patients were diverse and that interpersonal differences were as or more important than cultural differences. Some also felt that more understanding of Sámi culture would be helpful for enabling culturally respectful nursing care.


Assuntos
Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Noruega
14.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 22: e29, 2021 06 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34109935

RESUMO

AIMS: To collaboratively explore the cultural acceptance of the Pepi-Pod® program as an alternate safe sleep space and to explore the process of implementing the Pepi-Pod® program in a mainstream health service for Aboriginal families living in urban South Australia. BACKGROUND: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants continue to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) at rates three to four times greater than other infants born in Australia despite Council of Australian Governments commitment to halve the gap in the Indigenous infant mortality rate by 2018. The Pepi-Pod® program is evidenced in New Zealand and Queensland to provide a culturally appropriate safe sleep alternative that contributes to the reduction of SIDS and SUDI. We have no evidence of acceptability or feasibility when offered through mainstream services in metropolitan South Australia. METHODS: With a focus on decolonizing the research process through a two-way process for mutual learning between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal team members and community, a novel qualitative design was employed including photo elicited yarning sessions (n = 7), focus groups (n = 2), and field notes (n = 15). RESULTS: Four themes emerged: 'you don't have to worry'; 'a way of sharing knowledge'; 'it looks like a bread box?' and 'need for consistent safe sleep messages'. The findings suggest that participants believe the Pepi-Pod® program may enrich Aboriginal families' lives evoking feelings of comfort and safety; however, the design could be improved to make them more culturally appropriate. There was confusion around safe sleep processes and education with a call for streamlining safe sleep messaging.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Austrália , Humanos , Lactente , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/estatística & dados numéricos , Nova Zelândia , Projetos Piloto , Queensland , Austrália do Sul
15.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 52: 103005, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33652362

RESUMO

Storytelling is one method of arts-based learning. The pedagogy of arts-based learning integrates the arts into another topic to enhance learning. Nursing students' experiences of clinical placement are often complex. Students may benefit not only from cognitive thinking, but also creative reflection. This integrative literature review explores storytelling as an arts-based approach to learning during clinical placements. A search of electronic databases focused on articles published in English during 2010-2020. The search identified thirteen international papers. The diversity of clinical environments included community mental health, overseas placement, community aged care, and acute care hospitals. The synthesis revealed four main themes: arts-based learning in nurse education, student-patient communication, student-Registered Nurse communication, and student-educator communication. Engaging in stories as a means of reflection improved students' self-knowledge, identified their preconceptions and stereotyping of patients and so improving their patient interactions. Positive relationships between students and patients were not only necessary for caring practice, but also intrinsic to learning. Positive relationships between Registered Nurses and students reduced anxiety and encouraged students to focus on quality patient care. Storytelling provided a creative approach to reflect on practice. Reflection using the affective domain assisted students to reflect more broadly about their placement experience.


Assuntos
Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Idoso , Comunicação , Humanos , Aprendizagem
16.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 829, 2020 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Aboriginal women and their infants experience significant disadvantage in health outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Access to timely, effective and appropriate maternal and child healthcare can contribute to reducing these existing health disparities. However, accessing mainstream healthcare services often results in high levels of fear and anxiety, and low attendance at subsequent appointments among Aboriginal women, due to inefficient communication, poor service coordination and a lack of continuity of care. METHODS: This integrative literature review sought to explore factors that contribute to continuity of care and consider service features that contribute to positive care experiences and satisfaction with care received by Aboriginal women and their infants. In total, 28 studies were included in the review and were thematically analysed using Braun and Clarke's six steps of thematic analysis. This was followed by a collaborative, computer-assisted qualitative analysis, which resulted in the emergence of five key themes: lack of continuity of care, impact of lack of continuity of care, continuity of care interventions, impact of continuity of care interventions, and strategies to improve continuity of care. RESULTS: Most studies focused on health services in rural or remote Aboriginal communities and there was a lack of documented evidence of continuity of care (or lack thereof) for Aboriginal women living and birthing in regional and metropolitan areas. The majority of studies focused explicitly on continuity of care during the antenatal, birthing and immediate postnatal period, with only two studies considering continuity through to an infant's first 1000 days. CONCLUSION: The review highlights a lack of studies exploring continuity of care for Aboriginal families from the antenatal period through to an infants' first 1000 days of life. Included studies identified a lack of continuity in the antenatal, peri- and postnatal periods in both regional and metropolitan settings. This, along with identified strategies for enhancing continuity, have implications for communities, and healthcare services to provide appropriate and culturally safe care. It also marks an urgent need to incorporate and extend continuity of care and carer through to the first 1000 days for successful maternal and infant health outcomes for Aboriginal peoples.


Assuntos
Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Serviços de Saúde Materno-Infantil , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Adulto , Criança , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Feminino , Acessibilidade aos Serviços de Saúde , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Humanos , Lactente , Gravidez , População Rural
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 19(1): 477, 2019 Jul 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31299950

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Attention to culture and its impact on health care can improve the quality of care given, add to our understanding of health care among culturally diverse populations, and encourage a more holistic approach to health care within general care. Connection to culture is important to Aboriginal peoples, and integrating Aboriginal culture into general care in residential aged care facilities may contribute to improving care delivery and outcomes for residents. The literature to date revealed a lack of understanding of the capacity of residential aged care and the health practices of carers in relation to providing cultural care for Aboriginal people. This study aimed to explore how cultural care needs are maintained for Aboriginal residents from their own and their carers' perspectives. METHODS: Applying an Aboriginal centered research method, an Interpretive Descriptive Approach was used as a theoretical framework to explore data in this study. Semi structured audio-recorded interviews were conducted. An additional file provides a complete description of the interview questions used as a guide for the study [see Additional file 1]. Three Residential Aged Care Centres, in South Australia were used i.e., two rural from centres and one urban metropolitan centre. Seven Aboriginal residents and 19 carers participated in interviews. Data was transcribed and an interpretive analysis was employed to code the transcribed data for themes and sub-themes. The study was guided by an Aboriginal community advisory group with an aim to work under the principle of reciprocity; giving back to the communities, participants and those where the research results may have been relevant. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from the views of the residents and carers: (i) lack of resources and funding; (ii) care practice; and (iii) marginalisation of Aboriginal culture within aged care facilities. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that carers and residents believe cultural inclusion in general care practices may enrich Aboriginal residents' daily life, health and well-being in residential aged care facilities. This study may provide carers, aged care centre managers and policy makers with information on the need of resources, funding, organised care plan and management, and cultural competency of carers to be considered to improve Aboriginal aged care protocols for integrating cultural care into practice.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/etnologia , Instituição de Longa Permanência para Idosos , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Avaliação das Necessidades , Espiritualidade , Idoso , Cuidadores/psicologia , Cuidadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/psicologia , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Austrália do Sul
18.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 50(3): 127-133, 2019 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30835323

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many nurses working in hospitals are not prepared to provide appropriate care for older people. This qualitative study aimed to identify factors influencing the development of gerontological nursing competence in Iranian hospitals. METHOD: Twenty-six participants (nine nurses, 12 nurse managers, four clinical instructors, one physician) who worked in four teaching hospitals and nursing schools were interviewed by semistructured interview method. Conventional content analysis was used. RESULTS: Two main categories emerged from the data: (a) management factors with the subcategories of meritocracy in elderly nursing, leadership style of nursing managers, educational system, the quality of working life, and performance management; (b) organizational factors with the subcategories of organizational learning, and organizational support. CONCLUSION: These findings can help nurse managers and clinical instructors identify, develop, and implement strategies for further development of gerontological nursing competence. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2019;50(3):127-133.].


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Educação Continuada em Enfermagem/normas , Enfermagem Geriátrica/educação , Enfermagem Geriátrica/normas , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem Hospitalar/educação , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem Hospitalar/normas , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico) , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
19.
Int J Older People Nurs ; 13(4): e12210, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30248241

RESUMO

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: Defining the components of emotional competence in caring for older people in Iranian hospitals. BACKGROUND: People of older age are the largest recipients of healthcare services in hospitals. Thus, it is essential to establish what characteristics of emotional competence are required for nursing older people. DESIGN: This qualitative descriptive-exploratory study was conducted in Iran from September 2015 to April 2016. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 participants (nine nurses, 12 nurse managers, four clinical instructors), chosen by purposive and snowball sampling based on saturation. Data were analysed by content analysis method. RESULTS: Qualitative content analysis identified two core categories and seven subcategories from the data: (a) Individual emotional competence with five subcategories of positive attitude, spiritual maturity, emotional self-control, adherence to professional ethics and creativity and innovation, and (b) social emotional competence with two subcategories of relationship management and compassionate care. CONCLUSION: Emotional competence was identified as one of the main components of nursing skills when caring for older people. Gerontological nurses should demonstrate emotional competence in caring for older people and include a positive attitude, spiritual maturity, emotional self-control, adherence to professional ethics, creativity in care, successful relationship management and compassionate care in their practice. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: These findings can be used to guide development of emotional competencies for nursing older people.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Emoções , Enfermagem Geriátrica , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem Hospitalar/psicologia , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Irã (Geográfico) , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Aust Nurs Midwifery J ; 24(9): 40, 2017 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29272093

RESUMO

Despite a marked reduction in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infant deaths from 1998 to 2012 (AIHW 2015) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants remain over-represented in sudden and unexpected infant death rates.


Assuntos
Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Sono , Morte Súbita do Lactente/etnologia , Morte Súbita do Lactente/prevenção & controle , Austrália , Competência Cultural , Humanos , Lactente , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Desenvolvimento de Programas
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