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1.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 36(2): 112-120, 2024 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38236127

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) in the Netherlands have been allowed to perform the role of coordinating practitioner (CP) since 2018. This role is reserved for mental health care specialists who are trained and qualified at the master's degree level. Earlier studies have not addressed how PMHNPs perform that role and what mechanisms and contextual factors determine their performance. This understanding could help optimize their performance in this role and promote effective deployment of PMHNPs in mental health care. PURPOSE: To understand how PMHNPs perform this role and what mechanisms and contextual factors underlie that performance. METHODOLOGY: A multiple case study involving PMHNPs who work in various settings as CPs. Data were collected and analyzed using the realistic evaluation approach. RESULTS: We identified four mechanisms related to the performance of PMHNPs in the role of CP: (1) autonomous performance; (2) unique expertise; (3) accessibility, availability, and professional involvement; and (4) additional roles. The extent to which these mechanisms are present is largely determined by organizational factors, team factors, and individual factors. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners are seeking to identify and interpret the role of CP. This study helps to elucidate the mechanism of role performance by PMHNPs and what they should focus on to deliver effective and patient-centered mental health care. IMPLICATIONS: Policymakers, health care professionals, and educators should consider the mechanisms and contextual factors to facilitate and support PMHNPs' employment and training in the role of CP.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Profissionais de Enfermagem , Humanos , Países Baixos , Profissionais de Enfermagem/educação
2.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs ; 31(1): 87-110, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37551628

RESUMO

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mentalizing is the capacity to understand both one's own and other people's behaviour in terms of mental states, such as, for example, desires, feelings and beliefs. The mentalizing capacities of healthcare professionals help to establish effective therapeutic relationships and, in turn, lead to better patient outcomes. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The personal factors positively associated with the mentalizing capacities of healthcare professionals are being female, greater work experience and having a more secure attachment style. Psychosocial factors are having personal experience with psychotherapy, burnout, and in the case of female students, being able to identify with the female psychotherapist role model during training. There is limited evidence that training programmes can improve mentalizing capacities. Although the mentalization field is gaining importance and research is expanding, the implications for mental health nursing have not been previously reviewed. Mental health nurses are underrepresented in research on the mentalizing capacities of healthcare professionals. This is significant given that mental health nurses work closest to patients and thus are more often confronted with patients' behaviour compared to other health care professionals, and constitute a large part of the workforce in mental healthcare for patients with mental illness. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Given the importance of mentalizing capacity of both the patient and the nurse for a constructive working relationship, it is important that mental health nurses are trained in the basic principles of mentalization. Mental health nurses should be able to recognize situations where patients' lack of ability to mentalize creates difficulties in the interaction. They should also be able to recognize their own difficulties with mentalizing and be sensitive to the communicative implications this may have. ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Mentalizing capacities of clinicians help to build effective therapeutic relationships and lead to better patient outcomes. Few studies have focused on factors associated with clinicians' mentalizing capacities and the intervention strategies to improve them. AIM: Present a systematic review of empirical studies on factors associated with healthcare professionals' mentalizing capacities and the effectiveness of intervention programmes designed to improve these capacities. METHOD: Following PRISMA-guidelines, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and CINAHL. RESULTS: Out of a systematic search with 1537 hits, 22 studies were included. Personal factors positively associated with mentalizing capacities of healthcare professionals are being female, greater work experience and having a more secure attachment style. Psychosocial factors are having personal experience with psychotherapy, burnout, and in the case of female students, being able to identify with the female psychotherapist role model during training. Evidence that training programmes improve mentalizing capacities is limited. DISCUSSION: Mental health nurses are underrepresented in research on mentalizing capacities of healthcare professionals and training programs to improve these capacities are practically absent. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: For mental health nurses, training in basic mentalizing theory and skills will improve their capacities in building effective working relationships with patients.


Assuntos
Esgotamento Profissional , Transtornos Mentais , Mentalização , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Enfermagem Psiquiátrica , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoal de Saúde
3.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 672, 2023 09 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37715156

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Clients with severe mental illness (SMI) have overall poor physical health. SMI reduces life expectancy by 5-17 years, primarily due to physical comorbidity linked to cardiometabolic risks that are mainly driven by unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. To improve physical health in clients with SMI, key elements are systematic somatic screening and lifestyle promotion. The nurse-led GILL eHealth was developed for somatic screening and the implementation of lifestyle activities in clients with SMI. Aims of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the GILL eHealth intervention in clients with SMI compared to usual care, and to evaluate the implementation process, and the experiences of clients and healthcare providers with GILL eHealth. METHODS: The GILL study encompasses a cluster-randomised controlled trial in approximately 20 mental health care facilities in the Netherlands. The randomisation takes place at the team level, assigning clients to the eHealth intervention or the usual care group. The GILL eHealth intervention consists of two complementary modules for somatic screening and lifestyle promotion, resulting in personalised somatic treatment and lifestyle plans. Trained mental health nurses and nurse practitioners will implement the intervention within the multidisciplinary treatment context, and will guide and support the participants in promoting their physical health, including cardiometabolic risk management. Usual care includes treatment as currently delivered, with national guidelines as frame of reference. We aim to include 258 clients with SMI and a BMI of 27 or higher. Primary outcome is the metabolic syndrome severity score. Secondary outcomes are physical health measurements and participants' reports on physical activity, perceived lifestyle behaviours, quality of life, recovery, psychosocial functioning, and health-related self-efficacy. Measurements will be completed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. A qualitative process evaluation will be conducted alongside, to evaluate the process of implementation and the experiences of clients and healthcare professionals with GILL eHealth. DISCUSSION: The GILL eHealth intervention is expected to be more effective than usual care in improving physical health and lifestyle behaviours among clients with SMI. It will also provide important information on implementation of GILL eHealth in mental health care. If proven effective, GILL eHealth offers a clinically useful tool to improve physical health and lifestyle behaviours. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical trial registration NCT05533749, registration date: 8 September 2022.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Transtornos Mentais , Humanos , Animais , Qualidade de Vida , Brânquias , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem , Estilo de Vida , Transtornos Mentais/terapia
4.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 80(9): 886-894, 2023 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37342055

RESUMO

Importance: People with a severe mental illness (SMI) have a life expectancy reduced by 10 to 20 years compared with the general population, primarily attributable to cardiometabolic disorders. Lifestyle interventions for people with SMI can improve health and reduce cardiometabolic risk. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a group-based lifestyle intervention among people with SMI in outpatient treatment settings compared with treatment as usual (TAU). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Severe Mental Illness Lifestyle Evaluation (SMILE) study is a pragmatic cluster randomized clinical trial performed in 8 mental health care centers with 21 flexible assertive community treatment teams in the Netherlands. Inclusion criteria were SMI, age of 18 years or older, and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 27 or greater. Data were collected from January 2018 to February 2020, and data were analyzed from September 2020 to February 2023. Interventions: Weekly 2-hour group sessions for 6 months followed by monthly 2-hour group sessions for another 6 months, delivered by trained mental health care workers. The intervention targeted overall lifestyle changes, emphasizing establishing a healthy diet and promoting physical activity. TAU (control) did not include structured interventions or advice on lifestyle. Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted linear mixed models and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. The main outcome was body weight change. Secondary outcomes included changes in body mass index, blood pressure, lipid profiles, fasting glucose level, quality of life, self-management ability, and lifestyle behaviors (physical activity and health, mental health, nutrition, and sleep). Results: The study population included 11 lifestyle intervention teams (126 participants) and 10 TAU teams (98 participants). Of 224 included patients, 137 (61.2%) were female, and the mean (SD) age was 47.6 (11.1) years. From baseline to 12 months, participants in the lifestyle intervention group lost 3.3 kg (95% CI, -6.2 to -0.4) more than those in the control group. In the lifestyle intervention group, people with high attendance rates lost more weight than participants with medium and low rates (mean [SD] weight loss: high, -4.9 [8.1] kg; medium, -0.2 [7.8] kg; low, 0.8 [8.3] kg). Only small or no changes were found for secondary outcomes. Conclusions and Relevance: In this trial, the lifestyle intervention significantly reduced weight from baseline to 12 months in overweight and obese adults with SMI. Tailoring lifestyle interventions and increasing attendance rates might be beneficial for people with SMI. Trial Registration: Netherlands Trial Register Identifier: NTR6837.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Transtornos Mentais , Adulto , Humanos , Feminino , Adolescente , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Masculino , Qualidade de Vida , Saúde Mental , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Estilo de Vida
5.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e062242, 2023 04 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37072369

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To examine the extent of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health and well-being of mental health professionals (MHPs) in the Netherlands and understand their needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional, mixed-methods study was conducted with MHPs from the Netherlands from June 2020 to October 2020, consisting of an online survey and three online focus group discussions. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were MHPs from various occupational groups (psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, developmental education workers, etc). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The online survey included questions about work-related changes due to COVID-19 perceived resilience to stress, changes in lifestyle behaviours and mental health symptoms. The focus group discussions focused mostly on work experiences during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: MHP's reported an increase in experience workload during the pandemic (mean score 8.04 based on a scale of 1-10) compared to before the pandemic (mean score of 7). During the first wave of the pandemic, 50% of respondents reported increased stress, 32% increased sleeping problems and 24% increased mental health problems. Adverse occupational (eg, increased workload OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.28-2.32), psychological (eg, life satisfaction OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.52-0.75), lifestyle (eg, increased sleep problems OR 2.80, 95% CI 2.07-3.80) and physical factors (decline in physical health OR 3.56, 95% CI 2.61-4.85) were associated with a decline in mental health. Participants expressed significant concern in the focus group discussions about the duration of the pandemic, the high workload, less work-life balance and lack of contact with colleagues. Suggestions to improve working conditions included ensuring clear communication about guidelines and facilitating worker contact and support via peer-to-peer coaching where experiences can be shared. CONCLUSIONS: The current study indicates that MHP experienced a decline in mental health status during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which should be taken into consideration by employers, policymakers and researchers.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental , Estudos Transversais , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Condições de Trabalho , Países Baixos/epidemiologia
6.
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs ; 30(5): 1019-1026, 2023 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36998159

RESUMO

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: The clinical effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been confirmed for a majority of patients with several psychiatric disorders. ECT is mostly used in patients with severe depression. Choosing, persevering with and completing ECT depends on the patients' motivation for undergoing this therapy. However, the factors influencing patients' motivation for ECT have not yet been studied. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE: Four important factors that influence the motivation of patients diagnosed with major depression to have ECT were identified: (1) psychological pain and distress; (2) perceived need for treatment; (3) perception of ECT as an effective treatment; (4) influence of the environment. The first factor, psychological pain and distress, was perceived as the primary motivator for starting and continuing ECT. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Professionals should be aware of the factors that influence patients to have electroconvulsive therapy and their own role in the decision-making process and during treatment. As patients are susceptible to emotional support and as the motivation of patients for starting and continuing ECT is positively influenced by the advice and support of mental health professionals, these professionals have a key role in motivating patients for ECT. When the patient has decided to start ECT, mental health professionals should explore the factors that influence their motivation and regularly assess these factors so that they can guide the patient in their process. The professional should have an overview of these factors and investigate how they can be positively influenced to help patients keep their motivation during the treatment process. This will contribute to person-centred care and could lead to better treatment outcomes. ABSTRACT: Introduction The factors influencing patients' motivation for undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have not yet been subjected to a thorough study. Knowledge of these factors could improve the quality of care for patients with depression recommended to have ECT. Aim To identify the factors that influence the motivation of patients diagnosed with depression to have ECT. Method This qualitative study followed a grounded theory approach in which semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 patients from four different psychiatric hospitals to study their perspectives on factors influencing their motivation to have ECT. Results The explanatory framework of factors influencing motivation for ECT comprises four main categories, starting with the most important category, psychological pain and distress, and continuing with the following categories: perceived need for treatment; perception of ECT as an effective treatment; environmental influences. Discussion In this study, we found that the psychological pain and distress of depression, and their consequences in daily life, had been the primary experiences that motivated patients to start and continue ECT. Implications for Practice This is the first study that has examined motivational factors for patients with severe depression to participate in ECT. Professionals appear to have a key role in motivating patients for ECT. They should explore factors that influence motivation for ECT, regularly assess their motivation and intervene on influential factors.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Eletroconvulsoterapia , Humanos , Eletroconvulsoterapia/psicologia , Depressão/terapia , Motivação , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/terapia , Dor
7.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 108, 2023 02 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36797709

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking among people with severe mental illness (SMI) is highly prevalent and strongly associated with poor physical health. Currently, evidence-based smoking cessation interventions are scarce and need to be integrated into current mental health care treatment guidelines and clinical practice. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of a smoking cessation intervention in comparison with usual care in people with SMI treated by Flexible Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) teams in the Netherlands. METHODS: A pragmatic, cluster-randomised controlled trial with embedded process evaluation will be conducted. Randomisation will be performed at the level of FACT teams, which will be assigned to the KISMET intervention or a control group (care as usual). The intervention will include pharmacological treatment combined with behavioural counselling and peer support provided by trained mental health care professionals. The intervention was developed using a Delphi study, through which a consensus was reached on the core elements of the intervention. We aim to include a total of 318 people with SMI (aged 18-65 years) who smoke and desire to quit smoking. The primary outcome is smoking status, as verified by carbon monoxide measurements and self-report. The secondary outcomes are depression and anxiety, psychotic symptoms, physical fitness, cardiovascular risks, substance use, quality of life, and health-related self-efficacy at 12 months. Alongside the trial, a qualitative process evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the barriers to and facilitators of its implementation as well as the satisfaction and experiences of both patients and mental health care professionals. DISCUSSION: The results of the KISMET trial will contribute to the evidence gap of effective smoking cessation interventions for people treated by FACT teams. Moreover, insights will be obtained regarding the implementation process of the intervention in current mental health care. The outcomes should advance the understanding of the interdependence of physical and mental health and the gradual integration of both within the mental health care system. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register, NTR9783. Registered on 18 October 2021.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Transtornos Psicóticos , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Humanos , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/métodos , Saúde Mental , Qualidade de Vida , Transtornos Mentais/complicações , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
8.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 695, 2022 11 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36368947

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People with severe mental illness (SMI) often suffer from long-lasting symptoms that negatively influence their social functioning, their ability to live a meaningful life, and participation in society. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity can improve social functioning, but people with SMI experience multiple barriers to becoming physically active. Besides, the implementation of physical activity interventions in day-to-day practice is difficult. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness and implementation of a physical activity intervention to improve social functioning, mental and physical health. METHODS: In this pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial we aim to include 100 people with SMI and their mental health workers from a supported housing organization. The intervention focuses on increasing physical activity by implementing group sports activities, active guidance meetings, and a serious game to set physical activity goals. We aim to decrease barriers to physical activity through active involvement of the mental health workers, lifestyle courses, and a medication review. Participating locations will be divided into four clusters and randomization will decide the start of the intervention. The primary outcome is social functioning. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, symptom severity, physical activity, cardiometabolic risk factors, cardiorespiratory fitness, and movement disturbances with specific attention to postural adjustment and movement sequencing in gait. In addition, we will assess the implementation by conducting semi-structured interviews with location managers and mental health workers and analyze them by direct content analysis. DISCUSSION: This trial is innovative since it aims to improve social functioning in people with SMI through a physical activity intervention which aims to lower barriers to becoming physically active in a real-life setting. The strength of this trial is that we will also evaluate the implementation of the intervention. Limitations of this study are the risk of poor implementation of the intervention, and bias due to the inclusion of a medication review in the intervention that might impact outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial was registered prospectively in The Netherlands Trial Register (NTR) as NTR NL9163 on December 20, 2020. As the The Netherlands Trial Register is no longer available, the trial can now be found in the International Clinical Trial Registry Platform via: https://trialsearch.who.int/Trial2.aspx?TrialID=NL9163 .


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Qualidade de Vida , Humanos , Interação Social , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Exercício Físico , Estilo de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
9.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0271990, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35925975

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This was to elucidate the experiences and perceptions of people with severe mental illness (SMI) and their health care professionals with the SMILE (Severe Mental Illness Lifestyle Evaluation) group-based lifestyle intervention. SMILE focuses primarily on promoting healthy diet, physical activity and weight loss. METHOD: A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was conducted using purposive sampling. Interviews were conducted with 15 clients and 13 health care professionals (HCPs). Data were analysed according to a thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four overall themes were identified: interest in a lifestyle programme; group-based setting; changes in lifestyle behaviour; and preconditions for changing health behaviour. The results showed that clients valued the programme and were interested in the subject of lifestyle. The group-based setting was seen as a positive and important aspect of the intervention. Making lifestyle changes was acknowledged as difficult, especially in combination with the presence of psychiatric symptoms. Clients acquired an improved awareness of different aspects related to lifestyle behaviour. Irrespective of weight loss achieved, clients found their efforts successful with relatively 'small' changes. Some needed more support during the intervention than others. The practical activities in group sessions were regarded as most useful. HCPs were enthusiastic about the programme and their interactions with lifestyle improvements. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study shed light on different aspects that were considered important when delivering a lifestyle intervention to people with SMI. We recommend considering these aspects when implementing a lifestyle intervention in a mental health care setting for clients with SMI.


Assuntos
Estilo de Vida , Transtornos Mentais , Exercício Físico , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Redução de Peso
10.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272200, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35960783

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to establish the effectiveness of psychological relapse prevention interventions, as stand-alone interventions and in combination with maintenance antidepressant treatment (M-ADM) or antidepressant medication (ADM) discontinuation for patients with remitted anxiety disorders or major depressive disorders (MDD). METHODS: A systematic review and a meta-analysis were conducted. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO and Embase for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing psychological relapse prevention interventions to treatment as usual (TAU), with the proportion of relapse/recurrence and/or time to relapse/recurrence as outcome measure. RESULTS: Thirty-six RCTs were included. During a 24-month period, psychological interventions significantly reduced risk of relapse/recurrence for patients with remitted MDD (RR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86, p<0.001). This effect persisted with longer follow-up periods, although these results were less robust. Also, psychological interventions combined with M-ADM significantly reduced relapse during a 24-month period (RR 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62-0.94, p = 0.010), but this effect was not significant for longer follow-up periods. No meta-analysis could be performed on relapse prevention in anxiety disorders, as only two studies focused on relapse prevention in anxiety disorders. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with remitted MDD, psychological relapse prevention interventions substantially reduce risk of relapse/recurrence. It is recommended to offer these interventions to remitted MDD patients. Studies on anxiety disorders are needed. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO 2018: CRD42018103142.


Assuntos
Depressão , Psicoterapia , Antidepressivos/uso terapêutico , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Transtornos de Ansiedade/tratamento farmacológico , Transtornos de Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Doença Crônica , Depressão/terapia , Humanos , Intervenção Psicossocial , Psicoterapia/métodos , Recidiva
11.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 866779, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35873255

RESUMO

Background: There is still limited evidence on the effectiveness and implementation of smoking cessation interventions for people with severe mental illness (SMI) in Dutch outpatient psychiatric settings. The present study aimed to establish expert consensus on the core components and strategies to optimise practical implementation of a smoking cessation intervention for people treated by Flexible Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) teams in the Netherlands. Design: A modified Delphi method was applied to reach consensus on three core components (behavioural counselling, pharmacological treatment and peer support) of the intervention. The Delphi panel comprised five experts with different professional backgrounds. We proposed a first intervention concept. The panel critically examined the evolving concept in three iterative rounds of 90 min each. Responses were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results: Overall, results yielded that behavioural counselling should focus on preparation for smoking cessation, guidance, relapse prevention and normalisation. Pharmacological treatment consisting of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), Varenicline or Bupropion, under supervision of a psychiatrist, was recommended. The panel agreed on integrating peer support as a regular part of the intervention, thus fostering emotional and practical support among patients. Treatment of a co-morbid cannabis use disorder needs to be integrated into the intervention if indicated. Regarding implementation, staff's motivation to support smoking cessation was considered essential. For each ambulatory team, two mental health care professionals will have a central role in delivering the intervention. Conclusions: This study provides insight into expert consensus on the core components of a smoking cessation intervention for people with SMI. The results of this study were used for the development of a comprehensive smoking cessation program.

12.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(6): e35336, 2022 Jun 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35700002

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Approximately one-third of all patients with schizophrenia are treatment resistant. Worldwide, undertreatment with clozapine and other effective treatment options exist for people with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). In this respect, it appears that regular health care models do not optimally fit this patient group. The Collaborative Care (CC) model has proven to be effective for patients with severe mental illness, both in primary care and in specialized mental health care facilities. The key principles of the CC model are that both patients and informal caregivers are part of the treatment team, that a structured treatment plan is put in place with planned evaluations by the team, and that the treatment approach is multidisciplinary in nature and uses evidence-based interventions. We developed a tailored CC program for patients with TRS. OBJECTIVE: In this paper, we provide an overview of the research design for a potential study that seeks to gain insight into both the process of implementation and the preliminary effects of the CC program for patients with TRS. Moreover, we aim to gain insight into the experiences of professionals, patients, and informal caregivers with the program. METHODS: This study will be underpinned by a multiple case study design (N=20) that uses a mixed methods approach. These case studies will focus on an Early Psychosis Intervention Team and 2 Flexible Assertive Community treatment teams in the Netherlands. Data will be collected from patient records as well as through questionnaires, individual interviews, and focus groups. Patient recruitment commenced from October 2020. RESULTS: Recruitment of participants commenced from October 2020, with the aim of enrolling 20 patients over 2 years. Data collection will be completed by the end of 2023, and the results will be published once all data are available for reporting. CONCLUSIONS: The research design, framed within the process of developing and testing innovative interventions, is discussed in line with the aims of the study. The limitations in clinical practice and specific consequences of this study are explained. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/35336.

13.
J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc ; : 10783903221085596, 2022 Apr 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35442098

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The life expectancy of patients with severe mental illness (SMI) is estimated to be 20 to 30 years shorter than in the general population due to avoidable physical illnesses. This gap is widening. Health care professionals' performance with regard to physical health and lifestyle appears to be suboptimal. AIMS: The purpose of this study is to formulate recommendations to enhance physical care for patients with an SMI. METHODS: A generic descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Fifteen mental health nurses (MHNs) working in community mental health care in the Netherlands were interviewed. Thematic analysis of the data was performed. RESULTS: Most MHNs perceived physical screening and lifestyle interventions to be an important part of their professional role. However, they recognize discrepancy between their perception and actual practice. Most MHNs focus in particular on the psychiatric illness and its consequences for daily living, and they defined the provision of physical health care as a secondary concern. Participants described building a therapeutic relationship as a crucial, however, difficult part of the process of working on physical health promotion. Many MHNs tend to formulate goals and necessary behavioral changes on behalf of their patients, rather than helping them formulate their own goals and activities for themselves. CONCLUSIONS: Building a good therapeutic relationship with patients and supporting patients in defining their own lifestyle goals can enhance nursing physical care. Support by other team members (such as NPs) and managers is needed. In training and education for professionals, the lessons learned in this study should be included.

14.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 261, 2022 04 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35418082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lifestyle interventions for severe mental illness (SMI) are known to have small to modest effect on physical health outcomes. Little attention has been given to patient-reported outcomes (PROs). AIM: To systematically review the use of PROs and their measures, and quantify the effects of lifestyle interventions in patients with SMI on these PROs. METHODS: Five electronic databases were searched (PubMed/Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Web of Science) from inception until 12 November 2020 (PROSPERO: CRD42020212135). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of lifestyle interventions focusing on healthy diet, physical activity, or both for patients with SMI were included. Outcomes of interest were PROs. RESULTS: A total of 11.267 unique records were identified from the database search, 66 full-text articles were assessed, and 36 RCTs were included, of which 21 were suitable for meta-analyses. In total, 5.907 participants were included across studies. Lifestyle interventions had no significant effect on quality of life (g = 0.13; 95% CI = - 0.02 to 0.27), with high heterogeneity (I2 = 68.7%). We found a small effect on depression severity (g = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.00 to 0.58, I2 = 65.2%) and a moderate effect on anxiety severity (g = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.95, I2 = 0%). DISCUSSION: This meta-analysis quantifies the effects of lifestyle interventions on PROs. Lifestyle interventions have no significant effect on quality of life, yet they could improve mental health outcomes such as depression and anxiety symptoms. Further use of patient-reported outcome measures in lifestyle research is recommended to fully capture the impact of lifestyle interventions.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , Transtornos Mentais , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Qualidade de Vida
15.
JMIR Ment Health ; 9(3): e25441, 2022 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35293876

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Given that relapse is common in patients in remission from anxiety and depressive disorders, relapse prevention is needed in the maintenance phase. Although existing psychological relapse prevention interventions have proven to be effective, they are not explicitly based on patients' preferences. Hence, we developed a blended relapse prevention program based on patients' preferences, which was delivered in primary care practices by mental health professionals (MHPs). This program comprises contact with MHPs, completion of core and optional online modules (including a relapse prevention plan), and keeping a mood and anxiety diary in which patients can monitor their symptoms. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to provide insight into (1) usage intensity of the program (over time), (2) the course of symptoms during the 9 months of the study, and (3) the association between usage intensity and the course of symptoms. METHODS: The Guided E-healTh for RElapse prevention in Anxiety and Depression (GET READY) program was guided by 54 MHPs working in primary care practices. Patients in remission from anxiety and depressive disorders were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including anxiety and depressive symptoms, were collected via questionnaires at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months. Log data were collected to assess the usage intensity of the program. RESULTS: A total of 113 patients participated in the study. Twenty-seven patients (23.9%) met the criteria for the minimal usage intensity measure. The core modules were used by ≥70% of the patients, while the optional modules were used by <40% of the patients. Usage decreased quickly over time. Anxiety and depressive symptoms remained stable across the total sample; a minority of 15% (12/79) of patients experienced a relapse in their anxiety symptoms, while 10% (8/79) experienced a relapse in their depressive symptoms. Generalized estimating equations analysis indicated a significant association between more frequent face-to-face contact with the MHPs and an increase in both anxiety symptoms (ß=.84, 95% CI .39-1.29) and depressive symptoms (ß=1.12, 95% CI 0.45-1.79). Diary entries and the number of completed modules were not significantly associated with the course of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Although the core modules of the GET READY program were used by most of the patients and all patients saw an MHP at least once, usage decreased quickly over time. Most patients remained stable while participating in the study. The significant association between the frequency of contact and the course of symptoms most likely indicates that those who received more support had more symptoms, and thus, it is questionable whether the support offered by the program was sufficient to prevent these patients from relapsing. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s12888-019-2034-6.

16.
Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health ; 16(1): 10, 2022 Feb 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35164814

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Children and adolescents in mental healthcare often perceive their care needs and necessary treatment differently from their clinicians. As such discordance between young patients and clinicians may obstruct treatment adherence and compromise treatment outcomes, it is important to understand the factors associated with it. We therefore investigated the factors associated with patient-clinician discordance with regard to care needs in various areas of functioning. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 244 children/adolescents aged 6-18 participating with their clinicians in treatment at a specialized mental healthcare center. As a previous study conducted by our research group had found the greatest patient-clinician discordance in three CANSAS care needs-"mental health problems," "information regarding diagnosis and/or treatment," and "making and/or keeping friends"-we used univariable and multivariable statistics to investigate the factors associated with discordance regarding these three care needs. RESULTS: patient-clinician discordance on the three CANSAS items was associated with child, parent, and family/social-context factors. Three variables were significant in each of the three final multivariable models: dangerous behavior towards self (child level); severity of psychiatric problems of the parent (parent level); and growing up in a single-parent household (family/social-context level). CONCLUSIONS: To deliver treatment most effectively and to prevent drop-out, it is important during diagnostic assessment and treatment planning to address the patient's care needs at all three levels: child, parent and family/social context.

17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 27, 2022 Jan 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34983508

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several interventions have been developed to improve physical health and lifestyle behaviour of people with a severe mental illness (SMI). Recently, we conducted a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial which evaluated the effects of the one-year Severe Mental Illness Lifestyle Evaluation (SMILE) lifestyle intervention compared with usual care in clients with SMI. The SMILE intervention is a 12-month group-based lifestyle intervention with a focus on increased physical activity and healthy food intake. The aim of the current study was to explore the experiences of people with SMI and healthcare professionals (HCPs) regarding implementation feasibility of the SMILE intervention and the fidelity to the SMILE intervention. METHODS: A process evaluation was conducted alongside the pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The experiences of clients and HCPs in the lifestyle intervention group were studied. First, descriptive data on the implementation of the intervention were collected. Next, semi-structured interviews with clients (n = 15) and HCPs (n = 13) were performed. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis of the interview data was performed using MAXQDA software. In addition, observations of group sessions were performed to determine the fidelity to the SMILE intervention using a standardised form. RESULTS: Ten out of 26 HCPs who conducted the group sessions discontinued their involvement with the intervention, primarily due to changing jobs. 98% of all planned group sessions were performed. Four main themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Positive appraisal of the SMILE intervention, 2) Suggestions for improvement of the SMILE intervention 3) Facilitators of implementation and 4) Barriers of implementation. Both clients and HCPs had positive experiences regarding the SMILE intervention. Clients found the intervention useful and informative. The intervention was found suitable and interesting for all people with SMI, though HCPs sometimes had to tailor the intervention to individual characteristics of patients (e.g., with respect to cognitive functioning). The handbook of the SMILE intervention was perceived as user-friendly and helpful by HCPs. Combining SMILE with daily tasks, no support from other team members, and lack of staff and time were experienced as barriers for the delivery of the intervention. CONCLUSION: The SMILE intervention was feasible and well-perceived by clients and HCPs. However, we also identified some aspects that may have hindered effective implementation and needs to be considered when implementing the SMILE intervention in daily practice.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Transtornos Mentais/terapia
18.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 58(3): 1138-1143, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34240425

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate the ability of case managers, working in ambulatory treatment settings specialized in addiction care, to clinically judge demoralization in substance-dependent patients. DESIGN AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, clinical judgments of case managers were compared with the patients' scores on the Demoralization Scale, by calculating the sensitivity and specificity scores. FINDINGS: Case managers identified demoralization in 85% of the cases (sensitivity), the specificity of 62% suggests that demoralization was overestimated by case managers. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Demoralization is a frequently occurring phenomenon in patients. Methods should be developed that allow professionals and patients to identify demoralization collaboratively, and to develop tailored interventions to prevent demoralization and its negative consequences.


Assuntos
Desmoralização , Neoplasias , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Raciocínio Clínico , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/terapia
19.
Front Psychol ; 12: 694583, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34867583

RESUMO

Objective: To examine the underlying factor structure and psychometric properties of the Assessment of Self-management in Anxiety and Depression (ASAD) questionnaire, which was specifically designed for patients with (chronic) anxiety and depressive disorders. Moreover, this study assesses whether the number of items in the ASAD can be reduced without significantly reducing its precision. Methods: The ASAD questionnaire was completed by 171 participants across two samples: one sample comprised patients with residual anxiety or depressive symptoms, while the other consisted of patients who have been formally diagnosed with a chronic anxiety or depressive disorder. All participants had previously undergone treatment. Both exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were conducted. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were also assessed. Results: Both EFA and CFA indicated three solid factors: Seeking support, Daily life strategies and Taking ownership [Comparative Fit Index = 0.80, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.78, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = 0.09 (CI 0.08-1.00), Standardized Root Mean Square Residual = 0.09 (χ2 = 439.35, df = 168)]. The ASAD was thus reduced from 45 items to 21 items, which resulted in the ASAD-Short Form (SF). All sub-scales had a high level of internal consistency (> α = 0.75) and test-retest reliability (ICC > 0.75). Discussion: The first statistical evaluation of the ASAD indicated a high level of internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and identified three distinctive factors. This could aid patients and professionals' assessment of types of self-management used by the patient. Given that this study indicated that the 21-item ASAD-SF is appropriate, this version should be further explored and validated among a sample of patients with (chronic or partially remitted) anxiety and depressive disorders. Alongside this, to increase generalizability, more studies are required to examine the English version of the ASAD within other settings and countries.

20.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259620, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34762714

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: For patients, seclusion during psychiatric treatment is often a traumatic experience. To prevent such experiences, adjustments in the design of seclusion rooms have been recommended. METHODS: As there have been no empirical studies on the matter, we used a quasi-experimental design to compare the experiences in seclusion of two groups of patients: 26 who had been secluded in a room designed according to the principles of healing environment, a so called 'Enriched Environment Seclusion room' (EES), and 27 who had been secluded in a regular seclusion (RS) room. The enrichment included audio-visual facilities, a fixed toilet, a couch and a self-service system to adjust light, colour, blinds and temperature according to the patient's preferences. Insight into their experiences was obtained using the Patient View-of-Seclusion Questionnaire, which comprises nine statements on seclusion, supplemented with open-ended questions. RESULTS: The responses regarding seclusion experiences between the two groups did not differ significantly (U = 280.00, p = .21, r = -.17). Although those who had been secluded in the specially designed room had greatly appreciated the opportunities for distraction, and those who had been secluded in a regular seclusion room expressed the need for more distracting activities during seclusion, both groups described seclusion as a dreadful experience. If seclusion cannot be avoided, patients recommend facilities for distraction (such as those provided in an enriched environment seclusion room) to be available. CONCLUSION: Whatever the physical environment and facilities of a seclusion room, we may thus conclude that seclusion is a burdensome experience.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Psicoterapia/métodos , Psicoterapia/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Luz , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Música , Isolamento de Pacientes/métodos , Meio Social , Isolamento Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Temperatura , Jogos de Vídeo
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