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1.
Med Educ Online ; 28(1): 2145104, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36373897

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The authors explore how abortion regulations in Ohio, an abortion-restrictive state in the USA, impact obstetrician-gynecologists' (OB/GYNs) training in reproductive healthcare and describe what OB/GYNs believe to be the broader impact of Ohio's regulations on skill-building, skills maintenance, and professional retention of reproductive healthcare providers in the state. Authors discuss how their findings foreshadow abortion training limitations in Ohio and other abortion-restrictive states now that abortion regulations have returned to the states. METHODS: The authors conducted four semi-structured focus groups and five in-depth interviews between April 2019 and March 2020. Participants included OB/GYNs practicing obstetrics and gynecology in Ohio between 2010 and 2020. Thematic analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti. RESULTS: Twenty attending physicians and 15 fellows and residents participated in the study. Participants discussed the impact of Ohio's written transfer agreement, gestational-limit, and abortion method and facility bans on training and skill-building opportunities. Participants felt that Ohio's strict abortion regulations 1) limit opportunities to observe and perform abortion procedures during training; 2) require learning the ever-changing legality of abortion provision; 3) limit the number of abortions OB/GYNs can provide, leading to the atrophy of their skills over time; and 4) may prevent prospective medical students and residents from choosing to study in Ohio and may lead to physician attrition from the state. CONCLUSION: Prior to the reversal of federal protections for abortion in 2022, OB/GYNs in Ohio and other abortion-hostile states experienced barriers to training in abortion care. In returning abortion regulation to the states, access to training is likely to be increasingly restricted. This research demonstrates how abortion-restrictions hamper physicians' skills needed to care for patients, particularly in emergent situations. This puts patients at risk and places physicians in precarious ethical positions. Expanding protections and reducing restrictions on abortion will ensure OB/GYNs and trainees have the skills necessary to care for patients presenting for reproductive healthcare.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Ginecologia , Obstetrícia , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Aborto Induzido/métodos , Obstetrícia/educação
2.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 34(6): 373-378, 2022 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36342010

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The Dobbs vs Jackson case (Dobbs) decided by the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) in 2022 rescinded the constitutional right to abortion care, resulting in immediate state bans and severe restrictions on abortion care in almost half of the states at the time of submission. This article reviews the current state of abortion education and training as well as available curricula and programmes to support continued training. RECENT FINDINGS: Prior to Dobbs, a national residency-level training programme, the Ryan Residency Training Program, has helped expand abortion care training in residency programs nationally, yet there remained many barriers to incorporating this training into practice, including practice and hospital restrictions. New state restrictions now additionally constrain almost half of all the Ob-Gyn residency programmes. Medical students benefit from education on options counselling and values exploration. SUMMARY: Abortion care education and training is in crisis. Almost half of the Ob-Gyn residents are training in states that have banned or severely restricted abortion care. This threatens to create a workforce without critical early pregnancy management knowledge and skills. Residents are more likely to provide abortion care when they have scheduled routine training. Medical students can apply options counselling and values exploration knowledge broadly. Online education resources provide some patchwork solutions to continue abortion care education and training in this heavily restrictive landscape.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Internato e Residência , Obstetrícia , Gravidez , Feminino , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Currículo , Aborto Induzido/educação , Recursos Humanos , Obstetrícia/educação
3.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 34(6): 367-372, 2022 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36342009

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current review discusses the overarching role of advocacy as a primary component of access to abortion care. Abortion is viewed differently from any other form of health care, resulting in a marginalized, but essential healthcare component: without ongoing effective and strategic advocacy, abortion will not become or remain available. Lack of access to abortion care disproportionately affects historically excluded communities. RECENT FINDINGS: Advocacy is core to the provision of sexual and reproductive health. The antiabortion community has effectively used policy to achieve long-term goals of severely restricting access to abortion. Crisis pregnancy centers, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the antiabortion legislation of 2022 have exacerbated existing health inequities. Community engagement and advocacy skills assist providers to support access and combat inequities. Provider and trainee education, interprofessional collaboration, and leadership are critical in the effort to support comprehensive reproductive health care. SUMMARY: Through this literature review and our lived experiences as abortion providers, we assert the importance of healthcare professionals as advocates for abortion rights and services. The need for advocacy crosses specialties and communities; together we are stronger advocates as we continue to support and fight for access to safe legal and equitable abortion care.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , COVID-19 , Médicos , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Pandemias , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Aborto Legal
4.
BMC Womens Health ; 22(1): 434, 2022 11 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36335344

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies evaluating task sharing in postabortion care have mainly focused on women in first trimester and many lack a qualitative component. We aimed to evaluate patient acceptability of treatment of incomplete second trimester abortion using misoprostol provided by midwives compared with physicians and also gained a deeper understanding of the patients' lived treatment experiences in Uganda. METHODS: Our mixed methods study combined 1140 structured interview data from a randomized controlled equivalence trial and in-depth interviews (n = 28) among women managed with misoprostol for second trimester incomplete abortion at 14 public health facilities in Uganda. Acceptability, our main outcome, was measured at the 14-day follow-up visit using a structured questionnaire as a composite variable of: 1) treatment experience (as expected/ better than expected/ worse than expected), and 2) satisfaction - if patient would recommend the treatment to a friend or choose the method again. We used generalized mixed effects models to obtain the risk difference in acceptable post abortion care between midwife and physician groups. We used inductive content analysis for qualitative data. RESULTS: From 14th August 2018 to 16th November 2021, we assessed 7190 women for eligibility and randomized 1191 (593 to midwife and 598 to physician). We successfully followed up 1140 women and 1071 (94%) found the treatment acceptable. The adjusted risk difference was 1.2% (95% CI, - 1.2 to 3.6%) between the two groups, and within our predefined equivalence range of - 5 to + 5%. Treatment success and feeling calm and safe after treatment enhanced acceptability while experience of side effects and worrying bleeding patterns reduced satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Misoprostol treatment of uncomplicated second trimester incomplete abortion was equally and highly acceptable to women when care was provided by midwives compared with physicians. In settings that lack adequate staffing levels of physicians or where midwives are available to provide misoprostol, task sharing second trimester medical PAC with midwives increases patient's access to postabortion care services. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03622073.


Approximately 9.6% of abortion-related deaths occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. These deaths can be prevented if unintended pregnancies are avoided, women can access safe abortions within the expectations of the country's laws, and post abortion care (PAC) services are provided equitably. Previous research shows that women with abortion complications in the first trimester of pregnancy can be treated with misoprostol by either midwives or physicians. This sharing of tasks between the midwives and physicians is safe, effective, and acceptable. However, there is a gap in evidence on task sharing in the second trimester. To check practicability of task sharing in second trimester, we aimed to evaluate patient acceptability of treatment of incomplete second trimester abortion using misoprostol provided by midwives compared with physicians and also gained a deeper understanding of the patients' lived treatment experiences. Our study therefore combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Women's acceptability of misoprostol treatment for incomplete second trimester abortion was found to be equally acceptable when provided by midwives compared with physicians. Treatment success, feeling calm and safe after treatment increased acceptability, while experience of side effects and worrying bleeding patterns reduced satisfaction. Counselling of women may address some of these problems since it provides reassurance and reduces anxiety. In settings that lack adequate staffing levels of physicians or where midwives are available to provide misoprostol, task sharing second trimester medical PAC with midwives increases patient's access to PAC services.


Assuntos
Abortivos não Esteroides , Aborto Incompleto , Aborto Induzido , Tocologia , Misoprostol , Médicos , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Misoprostol/uso terapêutico , Aborto Incompleto/tratamento farmacológico , Abortivos não Esteroides/uso terapêutico , Segundo Trimestre da Gravidez , Primeiro Trimestre da Gravidez
5.
Am J Forensic Med Pathol ; 43(4): 376-379, 2022 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36377856

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Deaths due to hypertensive crisis can be unexplained because of the impossibility to identify-before the decease-the specific cause of the crisis. In these cases, autopsy and microscopic examinations are needed. It can happen that the request to conduct these examinations can be submitted to forensic pathologists by prosecutors to ascertain medical malpractice claims. Indeed, we report the case of a 36-year-old woman who died after a minimally invasive medical procedure because of the occurrence of a severe hypertensive crisis. After death, the woman's relatives raised formal complaint for medical malpractice. For this reason, the prosecutor ordered to perform an autopsy. Examining the abdominal cavity, the forensic pathologists identified the left adrenal gland as expanded; in correspondence with organ's medulla, there was a gray and noncapsulated mass. Immunohistochemistry was performed: the microscopic samples were diffusely positive for chromogranin A, suggesting the diagnosis of a subclinical pheochromocytoma. In light of the above, medical malpractice was excluded. This case highlights that forensic pathologists should be aware that, in case of unexpected deaths due to hypertensive crisis, adrenal glands should be always accurately evaluated, performing specific immunohistochemistry study to exclude the presence of a pheochromocytoma.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Neoplasias das Glândulas Suprarrenais , Feocromocitoma , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Adulto , Feocromocitoma/complicações , Feocromocitoma/diagnóstico , Neoplasias das Glândulas Suprarrenais/diagnóstico , Morte Súbita/etiologia , Autopsia , Aborto Induzido/efeitos adversos
6.
7.
Sex Reprod Health Matters ; 30(1): 2129686, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36368036

RESUMO

Traditional family planning research has excluded Black and Latinx leaders, and little is known about medication abortion (MA) among racial/ethnic minorities, although it is an increasingly vital reproductive health service, particularly after the fall of Roe v. Wade. Reproductive justice (RJ) community-based organisation (CBO) SisterLove led a study on Black and Latinx women's MA perceptions and experiences in Georgia. From April 2019 to December 2020, we conducted key informant interviews with 20 abortion providers and CBO leaders and 32 in-depth interviews and 6 focus groups (n = 30) with Black and Latinx women. We analysed data thematically using a team-based, iterative approach of coding, memo-ing, and discussion. Participants described multilevel barriers to and strategies for MA access, wishing that "the process had a bit more humanity … [it] should be more holistic." Barriers included (1) sociocultural factors (intersectional oppression, intersectional stigma, and medical experimentation); (2) national and state policies; (3) clinic- and provider-related factors (lack of diverse clinic staff, long waiting times); and (4) individual-level factors (lack of knowledge and social support). Suggested solutions included (1) social media campaigns and story-sharing; (2) RJ-based policy advocacy; (3) diversifying clinic staff, offering flexible scheduling and fees, community integration of abortion, and RJ abortion funds; and (4) social support (including abortion doulas) and comprehensive sex education. Findings suggest that equitable MA access for Black and Latinx communities in the post-Roe era will require multi-level intervention, informed by community-led evidence production; holistic, de-medicalised, and human rights-based care models; and intersectional RJ policy advocacy.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Georgia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estigma Social , Emoções
8.
Molecules ; 27(21)2022 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36364430

RESUMO

The aim of the study was the development and validation of the UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS method for the determination of mifepristone in human blood as well as the identification and quantification of its metabolites after self-induced pharmacological abortion. The metabolic pathway in humans was proposed after examination of an authentic casework. The fast and simple preanalytical procedure was successfully applied (pH9, tert-butyl-methyl ether). The validation parameters of the method were as follows: limit of quantification: 0.5 ng/mL; coefficients of determination: >0.999 (R2), intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision values did not exceed ± 13.2%. The recovery and matrix effect were in the range of 96.3-114.7% and from -3.0 to 14.7%, respectively. Toxicological analysis of the mother's blood (collected the day after the pregnancy termination) revealed the presence of five compounds: mifepristone (557.4 ng/mL), N-desmethyl-mifepristone (638.7 ng/mL), 22-OH-mifepristone (176.9 ng/mL), N,N-didesmethyl-mifepristone (144.5 ng/mL) and N-desmethyl-hydroxy-mifepristone (qualitatively). To our knowledge, the study presented in this paper is the first report on the concentrations of mifepristone and its metabolites in maternal blood samples after performing a self-induced abortion. The established UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS method is suitable for forensic toxicological analysis as well as in terms of clinical toxicology in future investigations (examination of pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and metabolism of RU-486).


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Mifepristona , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Espectrometria de Massas em Tandem , Aborto Induzido/métodos
10.
Soc Sci Res ; 108: 102785, 2022 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36334923

RESUMO

Women's attitudes towards abortion are often assessed infrequently in their lives. This measurement may not capture how lifetime events, such as reproductive experiences, potentially influence attitudes towards abortion. Although reproductive attitudes can fluctuate with life's circumstances, there is little research on how abortion attitudes may change when a woman suspects she might be pregnant. Using an intensive longitudinal dataset collected in Michigan, the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life (RDSL) study (2008-2012), we test the relationship between the timing of pregnancy scares and uncertainty and abortion attitudes using hybrid effects models. We find that women become less supportive of abortion while experiencing a pregnancy scare or uncertainty; however, this association exists only during a scare or uncertainty. These findings highlight that abortion attitudes may change when a woman suspects she might be pregnant. However, attitudinal change may not last past this period.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Incerteza , Atitude , Medo
12.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277342, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36331935

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Italy, abortion services are public: therefore, health Institutions should provide clear and easily readable web-based information. We aimed to 1) assess variation in abortion services utilisation; 2) analyse the readability of institutional websites informing on induced abortion; 3) explore whether easier-to-read institutional websites influenced the correct fruition of abortion services. METHODS: We identified from the 2021 administrative databases of Tuscany all women having an abortion, and-among them-women having an abortion with the certification provided by family counselling centres, following the pathway established by law. We assessed variation in total and certified abortion rates by computing the Systematic Component of Variation. We analysed the readability of the Tuscan health authorities' websites using the readability assessment tool READ-IT. We explored how institutional website readability influenced the odds of having certified abortions by running multilevel logistic models, considering health authorities as the highest-level variables. RESULTS: We observed high variation in the correct utilization of the abortion pathway in terms of certified abortion rates. The READ-IT scores showed that the most readable text was from the Florence Teaching Hospital website. Multilevel models revealed that higher READ-IT scores, corresponding to more difficult texts, resulted in lower odds of certified abortions. CONCLUSIONS: Large variation in the proper fruition of abortion pathways occurs in Tuscany, and such variation may depend on readability of institutional websites informing on induced abortion. Therefore, health Institutions should monitor and improve the readability of their websites to ensure proper and more equitable access to abortion.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Compreensão , Estudos Transversais , Leitura , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Internet
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e066650, 2022 11 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36385017

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To inform UK service development to support medical abortion at home, appropriate for person and context. DESIGN: Realist review SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Peer-reviewed literature from 1 January 2000 to 9 December 2021, describing interventions or models of home abortion care. Participants included people seeking or having had an abortion. INTERVENTIONS: Interventions and new models of abortion care relevant to the UK. OUTCOME MEASURES: Causal explanations, in the form of context-mechanism-outcome configurations, to test and develop our realist programme theory. RESULTS: We identified 12 401 abstracts, selecting 944 for full text assessment. Our final review included 50 papers. Medical abortion at home is safe, effective and acceptable to most, but clinical pathways and user experience are variable and a minority would not choose this method again. Having a choice of abortion location remains essential, as some people are unable to have a medical abortion at home. Choice of place of abortion (home or clinical setting) was influenced by service factors (appointment number, timing and wait-times), personal responsibilities (caring/work commitments), geography (travel time/distance), relationships (need for secrecy) and desire for awareness/involvement in the process. We found experiences could be improved by offering: an option for self-referral through a telemedicine consultation, realistic information on a range of experiences, opportunities to personalise the process, improved pain relief, and choice of when and how to discuss contraception. CONCLUSIONS: Acknowledging the work done by patients when moving medical abortion care from clinic to home is important. Patients may benefit from support to: prepare a space, manage privacy and work/caring obligations, decide when/how to take medications, understand what is normal, assess experience and decide when and how to ask for help. The transition of this complex intervention when delivered outside healthcare environments could be supported by strategies that reduce surprise or anxiety, enabling preparation and a sense of control.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Aborto Induzido/métodos , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Privacidade
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e063870, 2022 11 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36396313

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We conducted a scoping review to identify the types, volume and characteristics of available evidence and analyse the gaps in the knowledge base for evaluated interventions to reduce contraception and abortion stigma. DESIGN: We conducted a search of five electronic databases to identify articles published between January 2000 and January 2022, and explored the websites of relevant organisations and grey literature databases for unpublished and non-commercial reports. Articles were assessed for eligibility, and data were extracted. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and PsycINFO. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Articles included were: (1) published between January 2000 and January 2022, (2) written in English, (3) reports of the evaluation of an intervention designed to reduce contraceptive and/or abortion stigma, (4) used any type of study design and (5) conducted in any country context. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Included studies were charted according to study location, study aim, study design, type of contraceptive method(s), study population, type of stigma, and intervention approach. RESULTS: Some 18 articles were included in the final analysis (11 quantitative, 6 qualitative and 1 mixed methods). Fourteen of the studies focused exclusively on abortion stigma, and two studies focused on contraception stigma only; while two studies considered both. A majority of the studies aimed to address intrapersonal stigma. We found no interventions designed to address stigma at the structural level. In terms of intervention approaches, seven were categorised as education/training/skills building, five as counselling/peer support, three as contact and three as media. CONCLUSION: There is a dearth of evaluations of interventions to reduce contraception and abortion stigma. Investment in implementation science is necessary to develop the evidence base and inform the development of effective interventions, and use existing stigma scales to evaluate effectiveness. This scoping review can serve as a precursor to systematic reviews assessing the effectiveness of approaches.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Estigma Social , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Anticoncepção , Aconselhamento , Anticoncepcionais
15.
PLoS Med ; 19(11): e1004129, 2022 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36413512

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommends to wait at least 6 months after miscarriage and induced abortion before becoming pregnant again to avoid complications in the next pregnancy, although the evidence-based underlying this recommendation is scarce. We aimed to investigate the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes-preterm birth (PTB), spontaneous PTB, small for gestational age (SGA) birth, large for gestational age (LGA) birth, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-by interpregnancy interval (IPI) for births following a previous miscarriage or induced abortion. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study using a total of 49,058 births following a previous miscarriage and 23,707 births following a previous induced abortion in Norway between 2008 and 2016. We modeled the relationship between IPI and 6 adverse pregnancy outcomes separately for births after miscarriages and births after induced abortions. We used log-binomial regression to estimate unadjusted and adjusted relative risk (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In the adjusted model, we included maternal age, gravidity, and year of birth measured at the time of the index (after interval) births. In a sensitivity analysis, we further adjusted for smoking during pregnancy and prepregnancy body mass index. Compared to births with an IPI of 6 to 11 months after miscarriages (10.1%), there were lower risks of SGA births among births with an IPI of <3 months (8.6%) (aRR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.92, p < 0.01) and 3 to 5 months (9.0%) (aRR 0.90, 95% CI: 0.83, 0.97, p = 0.01). An IPI of <3 months after a miscarriage (3.3%) was also associated with lower risk of GDM (aRR 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.96, p = 0.01) as compared to an IPI of 6 to 11 months (4.5%). For births following an induced abortion, an IPI <3 months (11.5%) was associated with a nonsignificant but increased risk of SGA (aRR 1.16, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.36, p = 0.07) as compared to an IPI of 6 to 11 months (10.0%), while the risk of LGA was lower among those with an IPI 3 to 5 months (8.0%) (aRR 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.98, p = 0.03) compared to an IPI of 6 to 11 months (9.4%). There was no observed association between adverse pregnancy outcomes with an IPI >12 months after either a miscarriage or induced abortion (p > 0.05), with the exception of an increased risk of GDM among women with an IPI of 12 to 17 months (5.8%) (aRR 1.20, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.40, p = 0.02), 18 to 23 months (6.2%) (aRR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.50, p = 0.03), and ≥24 months (6.4%) (aRR 1.14, 95% CI: 0.97, 1.34, p = 0.10) compared to an IPI of 6 to 11 months (4.5%) after a miscarriage. Inherent to retrospective registry-based studies, we did not have information on potential confounders such as pregnancy intention and health-seeking bahaviour. Furthermore, we only had information on miscarriages that resulted in contact with the healthcare system. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that conceiving within 3 months after a miscarriage or an induced abortion is not associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In combination with previous research, these results suggest that women could attempt pregnancy soon after a previous miscarriage or induced abortion without increasing perinatal health risks.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Aborto Espontâneo , Diabetes Gestacional , Doenças do Recém-Nascido , Nascimento Prematuro , Gravidez , Recém-Nascido , Feminino , Humanos , Resultado da Gravidez/epidemiologia , Aborto Espontâneo/epidemiologia , Aborto Espontâneo/etiologia , Intervalo entre Nascimentos , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Nascimento Prematuro/epidemiologia , Nascimento Prematuro/etiologia , Retardo do Crescimento Fetal
16.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 279: 130-131, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36334375

RESUMO

The judicial review by the Supreme Court of the United States on Roe v. Wade has fundamentally limited the ability of women to exercise choice and control of their sexual and reproductive rights in the United States. The global organisations are concerned that there remains a risk that women's rights will be diminished globally in future.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Ginecologia , Obstetrícia , Gravidez , Estados Unidos , Feminino , Humanos , Direitos da Mulher , Decisões da Suprema Corte , Aborto Legal , Direitos Sexuais e Reprodutivos
17.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VII(4): 261-263, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36398395

RESUMO

On June 24, 2022, the US Supreme Court issued its ruling in the landmark case Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization that overturned the constitutional right to abortion with a decision that opposes the will of the majority of Americans. Two earlier Supreme Court decisions had established and upheld that constitutional right for almost 50 years. Now, however, a "super majority" of the Court (6 of its 9 members) has voted to leave laws regarding abortion to the individual states. As soon as the Court's final decision was announced, demonstrations began in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC and throughout many states and cities. At the same time, anti-abortion crowds celebrated their victory in the streets, an indication of how polarised the United States has become.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Gravidez , Estados Unidos , Feminino , Humanos , Decisões da Suprema Corte , Política
18.
J Law Med Ethics ; 50(3): 566-568, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36398632

RESUMO

It is a huge pleasure to engage with Prof. Shaw's careful and close reading of my article. Though almost a decade old, many of the issues are becoming only more relevant as it seems that Roe v Wade will be overruled in the U.S. and travel for abortion will become a sad reality.1 I appreciate how deeply Prof. Shaw interacts with my article and am full of praise for his work, but given the small space allocated here I only focus on our few places of disagreement.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Aborto Legal , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Turismo
19.
J Law Med Ethics ; 50(3): 608-612, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36398641

RESUMO

In a dynamic term of the United States Supreme Court in 2021-2022 a series of critical cases raise manifold changes and impacts on individual and communal health through 10 key areas ranging from abortions to vaccinations.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Saúde Pública , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Decisões da Suprema Corte
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