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1.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11399, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38736678

RESUMO

Introduction: Medical students are frequently introduced to medical school curricula through anatomy coursework, which often includes histology and embryology content. As medical education has increasingly emphasized integration of content areas, use of activities such as case-based learning (CBL) sessions has grown. Little published work has demonstrated the effectiveness of CBL sessions in integrating anatomy, embryology, and histology on first-year medical students' ability to improve content mastery and adapt their study techniques. Methods: We developed a CBL session that included anatomy, embryology, and histology content covering the upper extremity and breast pathology that was taught to incoming first-year medical students (N = 51) during a prematriculation program in the summers of 2022 and 2023. The session involved completion of an individual pre- and postsession quiz; group completion of clinical cases involving image interpretation, matching exercises, and construction of diagrams, flowcharts, or tables; and a postsession survey with Likert-style and free-response questions about preparation and session effectiveness. Results: Postsession quiz scores significantly improved (p < .001). On the postsession survey (response rate: 59%), students commented that they enjoyed the real-life application and integration of the cases and that the sessions improved their understanding of the connections between content areas. Other comments demonstrated that students were evaluating and adapting their study approach in preparation for the sessions, often using techniques introduced and practiced in the sessions. Discussion: CBL sessions can provide opportunities to incoming first-year medical students to practice, adapt, and evaluate study techniques while delivering integrated content.


Assuntos
Anatomia , Mama , Currículo , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Avaliação Educacional , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes de Medicina , Extremidade Superior , Humanos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Feminino , Mama/anatomia & histologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Anatomia/educação
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 528, 2024 May 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741110

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medical students view clinical workplace placements as an inspiring and motivating learning environment where active student participation is pivotal to development of students' identity. The progress from pre-clerkship to clerkship education harbors many challenges which consist of experiential learning, adjusting to the clinical environment, and understanding roles & responsibilities. Workplace learning is underpinned by various adult learning theories including social theories,constructivism, supported participation and legitimate peripheral participation. Workplace learning course was recently initiated for pre-clerkship students at a medical university in UAE, which will enable their smooth entry into the clerkship phase of the curriculum. OBJECTIVES: The research aims to explore students' perceptions of various domains of their clinical learning environment (CLE), highlight the challenges they face, and extract valuable feedback to improve their environment. METHODS: This study was conducted qualitatively by using focus groups method in order to explore students' perceptions of the clinical learning environment. Two focus group discussions were conducted (n = 8 +/-10) to determine the common challenges of workplace learning and its potential solutions. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The approach used to carry out this study was phenomenology, as it helps to understand the learning and behavior of these students who are undergoing this pre-clerkship training in order to transition smoothly to the clerkship phase. RESULT: The focus groups helped to deeply explore the perceptions of students about their clinical learning environment. It helped to reveal the challenges encountered by the students including the significance of proper orientation of staff and students, language barrier, availability of learning opportunities, and supervision quality. The focus groups provided worthwhile suggestions to improve the learning opportunities in the clinical learning environment which include orientation of the staff and students what to expect, improved supervision, mentoring and providing learning opportunities to encourage participation. CONCLUSION: This study attempted to identify the pre-clerkship students' perception of their clinical learning environment and the challenges they face over there. Possible suggestions by the students included a formal orientation for the staff and students to be carried out at the beginning. Efforts should be made by clerkship directors to provide students with learning opportunities by increasing patient exposure, encouraging participation, and providing high-quality supervision.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico , Grupos Focais , Estudantes de Medicina , Local de Trabalho , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Emirados Árabes Unidos , Feminino , Masculino , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Adulto , Aprendizagem , Currículo , Adulto Jovem
3.
Ann Med ; 56(1): 2349205, 2024 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38738408

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: This study compares pharmacy students' performance using face-to-face (FTF) team-based learning (TBL) vs. virtual TBL across multiple courses and different academic levels while accounting for student demographic and academic factors. METHODS: The study included pharmacy students from different academic levels (P1-P3) who were enrolled in three didactic courses taught using FTF TBL and virtual TBL. Multiple generalized linear models (GLMs) were performed to compare students' performance on individual readiness assurance tests (iRATs), team readiness assurance tests (tRATs), team application exercises (tAPPs), summative exams, and total course scores using FTF TBL vs. virtual TBL, adjusting for students' age, sex, race, and cumulative grade point average (cGPA). RESULTS: The study involved a total of 356 pharmacy students distributed across different academic levels and learning modalities: P1 students [FTF TBL (n = 26), virtual TBL (n = 42)], P2 students [FTF TBL (n = 77), virtual TBL (n = 71)], and P3 students [FTF TBL (n = 65), virtual TBL (n = 75)]. In the P1 cohort, the virtual group had higher iRAT and tRAT scores but lower tAPP scores than the FTF TBL group, with no significant differences in summative exams or total course scores. For P2 students, the virtual TBL group had higher iRAT and tRAT scores but lower summative exam scores and total course scores than the FTF TBL group, with no significant differences in tAPP scores. In the P3 student group, the virtual TBL group had higher iRAT, tRAT, tAPP, summative exam, and total course scores than the FTF TBL group. CONCLUSIONS: Students' performance in virtual TBL vs. FTF TBL in the pharmacy didactic curriculum varies depending on the course content, academic year, and type of assessment.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Educação em Farmácia , Avaliação Educacional , Estudantes de Farmácia , Humanos , Estudantes de Farmácia/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Farmácia/psicologia , Masculino , Feminino , Educação em Farmácia/métodos , Desempenho Acadêmico/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Currículo
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 501, 2024 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38711080

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Implementing PBL in teaching and learning can be challenging due to a variety of complex barriers. Studies on barriers to the implementation of problem-based learning in Ethiopia are scarce. This study aimed to explore the barriers to the implementation of problem-based learning at the Debre Berhan University Medical School. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted among faculty and medical students at the medical school. Purposive sampling was used to select participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with tutors and academic leaders, including the problem-based learning coordinator, the biomedical sciences coordinator, and the school dean. Data was also collected from students through focus group discussions. All interviews and discussions were recorded. The four steps of data analysis of Spradley, including domain analysis, taxonomic analysis, componential analysis, and theme analysis, were employed. RESULTS: The study identified student-related, tutor-related, case scenario-related, and assessment-related barriers as the most significant obstacles to implementing problem-based learning. These barriers included work overload for both students and tutors, lack of training and experience among tutors, student reluctance, absence of standardized case scenarios, subjectivity of assessment methods, and on-the-spot assessment of students. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Lack of both tutor and student commitment, lack of standardized cases, absence of a recognition of staff input, gap in communication skills, work overload, lack of continuous training, and at-spot evaluation of students were identified as the main barriers to the implementation of PBL.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Faculdades de Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Etiópia , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Grupos Focais , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Masculino , Feminino , Docentes de Medicina , Entrevistas como Assunto
5.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11401, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38716162

RESUMO

Introduction: Vascular anomalies are a spectrum of disorders, including vascular tumors and malformations, that often require multispecialty care. The rarity and variety of these lesions make diagnosis, treatment, and management challenging. Despite the recognition of the medical complexity and morbidity associated with vascular anomalies, there is a general lack of education on the subject for pediatric primary care and subspecialty providers. A needs assessment and the lack of an available standardized teaching tool presented an opportunity to create an educational workshop for pediatric trainees using the POGIL (process-oriented guided inquiry learning) framework. Methods: We developed a 2-hour workshop consisting of an introductory didactic followed by small- and large-group collaboration and case-based discussion. The resource included customizable content for learning assessment and evaluation. Residents completed pre- and posttest assessments of content and provided written evaluations of the teaching session. Results: Thirty-four learners in pediatrics participated in the workshop. Session evaluations were positive, with Likert responses of 4.6-4.8 out of 5 on all items. Pre- and posttest comparisons of four content questions showed no overall statistically significant changes in correct response rates. Learners indicated plans to use the clinical content in their practice and particularly appreciated the interactive teaching forum and the comprehensive overview of vascular anomalies. Discussion: Vascular anomalies are complex, potentially morbid, and often lifelong conditions; multispecialty collaboration is key to providing comprehensive care for affected patients. This customizable resource offers a framework for trainees in pediatrics to appropriately recognize, evaluate, and refer patients with vascular anomalies.


Assuntos
Hemangioma , Internato e Residência , Pediatria , Malformações Vasculares , Humanos , Pediatria/educação , Pediatria/métodos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Malformações Vasculares/diagnóstico , Hemangioma/diagnóstico , Ensino , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Currículo
6.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 66(1): e1-e5, 2024 Apr 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38708755

RESUMO

The Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro (NMFC) programme, a government initiative to address healthcare inequities in South Africa, focuses on the training of indigenous students to become competent healthcare practitioners. A collaboration combining training in a Cuban primary care, preventative system with integration in a South African institution within a quadruple disease burdened healthcare system. This article reflects on integration experience at the University of Witwatersrand, a programme pedagogically positioned within a workplace-based, situated learning framework. Since 2022, community-oriented primary care (COPC) projects became part of the integrated primary care and family medicine learning objectives. This article summarises the experience of the 2021-2022 cohort and calls for the strengthening of undergraduate medical education curricula with learning objectives reflective of social accountability.Contribution: This article spotlights work in the undergraduate space around teaching and experiential learning of community-oriented primary care in line with the journal's scope.


Assuntos
Currículo , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Humanos , África do Sul , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Serviços de Saúde Comunitária , Cuba , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 510, 2024 May 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38720261

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bioinstrumentation is essential to biomedical engineering (BME) undergraduate education and professional practice. Several strategies have been suggested to provide BME students with hands-on experiences throughout the curriculum, promoting their preparedness to pursue careers in industry and academia while increasing their learning and engagement. This paper describes the implementation of challenge-based learning (CBL) in an undergraduate bioinstrumentation blended course over the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The CBL experience was implemented in a third-year bioinstrumentation course from the BME program at Tecnologico de Monterrey. Thirty-nine students enrolled in two sections formed fourteen teams that tackled blended learning activities, including online communication, lab experiments, and in-person CBL activities. Regarding the latter, students were challenged to design, prototype, and test a respiratory or cardiac gating device for radiotherapy. An institutional student opinion survey was used to assess the success of our CBL implementation. RESULTS: Student responses to the end-of-term survey showed that they strongly agreed that this course challenged them to learn new concepts and develop new skills. Furthermore, they rated the student-lecturer interaction very positively despite the blended format. Overall, students assessed their learning experience positively. However, implementing this CBL experience required a substantial time increase in planning, student tutoring, and constant communication between lecturers and the industry partner. CONCLUSION: This work provides an effective instance of CBL for BME education to improve students' learning experience despite decreased resource efficiency. Our claim is supported by the student's performance and the positive feedback from our industrial partner.


Assuntos
Engenharia Biomédica , COVID-19 , Currículo , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Humanos , Engenharia Biomédica/educação , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemias , Educação a Distância/organização & administração
8.
Br J Nurs ; 33(10): 464-471, 2024 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38780981

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic face-to-face activities were suspended, boosting the delivery of online teaching. As students returned to campuses, the delivery of active learning teaching methods followed a blended learning style. The flipped classroom, which is a student-centred approach, appears to be an effective teaching method, generating improved learning outcomes. No systematic review has so far explored students' experiences of this teaching method - a knowledge gap that this review aims to address. METHODS: Studies published between 2012 and 2023 were identified from seven databases. The JBI critical appraisal tool was adopted to select high-quality studies and add credibility. Following extraction of qualitative data, meta-aggregation was used to identify synthesised findings. RESULTS: The findings were aggregated into seven categories. Based on meaning similarity, three synthesised findings were identified to answer the research question on how nursing students experience the flipped classroom method. CONCLUSION: Several factors affect the student experience. Although variables are interrelated and complex to analyse, this approach is a valuable teaching method, positively experienced by students with the potential to improve engagement and learning outcomes. The group activities used as a feature of the flipped classroom can be seen as an instrument to deliver a safer and high quality of care.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Humanos , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , COVID-19 , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/métodos , Educação a Distância/métodos
9.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2352217, 2024 Dec 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38758979

RESUMO

As medical schools move to integrate the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (EPAs) into curricula and address the transition from student to resident, residency preparatory courses have become more prevalent. The authors developed an experiential learning EPA-based capstone course for assessment to determine impact on learner self-assessed ratings of readiness for residency and acquisition of medical knowledge. All fourth-year students from the classes of 2018-2020 completed a required course in the spring for assessment of multiple EPAs, including managing core complaints, performing basic procedures, obtaining informed consent, and providing patient handoffs. Learners selected between three specialty-based parallel tracks - adult medicine, surgery, or pediatrics. Students completed a retrospective pre-post questionnaire to provide self-assessed ratings of residency preparedness and comfort in performing EPAs. Finally, the authors studied the impact of the course on knowledge acquisition by comparing student performance in the adult medicine track on multiple choice pre- and post-tests. Four hundred and eighty-one students were eligible for the study and 452 (94%) completed the questionnaire. For all three tracks, there was a statistically significant change in learner self-assessed ratings of preparedness for residency from pre- to post-course (moderately or very prepared: adult medicine 61.4% to 88.6% [p-value < 0.001]; surgery 56.8% to 81.1% [p-value < 0.001]; pediatrics 32.6% to 83.7% [p-value 0.02]). A similar change was noted in all tracks in learner self-assessed ratings of comfort from pre- to post-course for all studied EPAs. Of the 203 students who participated in the adult medicine track from 2019-2020, 200 (99%) completed both the pre- and post-test knowledge assessments. The mean performance improved from 65.0% to 77.5% (p-value < 0.001). An experiential capstone course for the assessment of EPAs can be effective to improve learner self-assessed ratings of readiness for residency training and acquisition of medical knowledge.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Internato e Residência , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Avaliação Educacional , Currículo , Autoavaliação (Psicologia) , Estudos Retrospectivos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Feminino , Educação de Graduação em Medicina
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 496, 2024 May 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702656

RESUMO

Making health science students aware of the importance of basic science knowledge for professional practice is a major educational challenge, especially during the early years of preclinical courses. Here, using an integrated curricular approach, we analyze whether Work Station Learning Activities (WSLA), which combine active learning methodologies for teaching basic science in clinical scenarios, can help to develop deeper learning and student engagement. In order to increase student motivation, we evaluated the effectiveness of WSLA using statistical analyses and an observation tool based on the ICAP (Interactive, Constructive, Active, and Passive) framework, which categorizes learning tasks based on the nature of student engagement. Statistical analyses revealed positive correlations between the different summative evaluations along the development of the activities, indicating the learning process inherent to WSLA progression and affirming the positive influence of WSLA on academic outcomes. Comparing the pre- and post-tests, students scored significantly higher on the post-test (statistically significant p < 0.001). WSLA promotes both constructivist and interactive learning, as validated by its alignment with the ICAP model. The study examines student engagement through systematic observation, revealing a relationship between student engagement and final grades. Students who exhibit constructive learning consistently earn higher grades, emphasizing the positive impact of active engagement. Thus, passive behavior profiles show a significant proportion of fails (40%), while constructive profiles stand out as the sole recipients of the coveted excellent rating. Ultimately, this study contributes to our understanding of the effectiveness of WSLA in promoting active learning and enhancing student engagement within integrated health education curricula. It highlights the importance of active learning behaviors for academic success and suggests avenues for further research to optimize integrated teaching methodologies in medical education.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Currículo , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Humanos , Avaliação Educacional , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Motivação
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 545, 2024 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38750537

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the learning in the implant dentistry hands-on course to that of the flipped classroom (FC) and the traditional lecture cohorts (control). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study,80 students were enrolled for the first time in an implant dentistry program. Subsequently, they were divided into two groups. The first, the FC group, which had free access to a video with a PowerPoint presentation on the Chaoxing-WHU-MOOC platform about the implant placement on first molar sites before class. The second, the control group, which attended a didactic lecture describing implant practice on the first molar site via a bidirectional multimedia interactive teaching demonstration and then operated on a simulation model. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the deviation gauge were utilized to analyze the accuracy of the implant placement in the students' models. An online satisfaction questionnaire was distributed to both groups one week after the class. RESULTS: The linear deviation of the CBCT examination did not show any statistical difference between the two groups concerning cervical, apex, and angular. A significant buccal deviation was observed in the control group compared with the FC group (mean: 0.7436 mm vs. 0.2875 mm, p = 0.0035), according to the restoration-level deviation gauge. A total of 74.36% of students in the FC group placed implant within 0.5 mm buccal-to-lingual deviations, but only 41.03% of students in the control group reached within 0.5 mm buccal-to-lingual deviation ranges. Additionally, 91.67% of the students in the FC group and 97.5% of the students in the control group were satisfied with the practical implant class. CONCLUSION: FC was more effective than a didactic lecture for implant dentistry practical skill acquisition.


Assuntos
Implantação Dentária , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Educação em Odontologia/métodos , Implantação Dentária/educação , Currículo , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Feminino , Masculino , Avaliação Educacional , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes de Odontologia , Competência Clínica
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 552, 2024 May 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38760834

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) relies on self-directed learning in small groups in the presence of a tutor. While the effectiveness of PBL is often attributed to the dynamics of group function, change in group function over time and factors influencing group function development are less understood. This study aims to explore the development of PBL group function over time to better understand the factors that give rise to high-functioning groups. METHOD: We examined time-function graphs of group function and conducted semi-structured focus group discussions in 2023 with medical students enrolled in a PBL curriculum. Students reflected on their experiences in four different PBL groups, creating time-function graphs to characterize development of group function over 8-12-week periods. We analyzed graphs and transcripts in a staged approach using qualitative description and direct content analysis, sensitized by two frameworks: Tuckman's Stages of Group Development and the Dimensions of PBL Group Function. RESULTS: Three archetypes of PBL group function development were identified: Slow Shifters, Fast Flippers, and Coasters. (1) Slow Shifters were characterized by a complex and extended pattern of growth consistent with Tuckman's model, typically occurring amongst inexperienced groups, or groups faced with a novel task. (2) Fast Flippers were characterized by abrupt state changes in group function arising from internal or external disruptions. (3) Coasters were characterized by plateaus, where maintenance of group function was a frequently cited challenge. Abrupt changes and plateaus occurred more among mature groups and groups with significant PBL experience. CONCLUSIONS: PBL group function varies over time in 3 different patterns. Classic Tuckman's stages are apparent among inexperienced groups, or groups facing novel tasks, whereas experienced groups often face abrupt change or plateaus. PBL educators and students should consider the need for novelty and disruption in more experienced groups to incite growth.


Assuntos
Grupos Focais , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Currículo , Processos Grupais , Feminino , Masculino
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 459, 2024 Apr 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38671434

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Resuscitation is a team effort, and it is increasingly acknowledged that team cooperation requires training. Staff shortages in many healthcare systems worldwide, as well as recent pandemic restrictions, limit opportunities for collaborative team training. To address this challenge, a learner-centred approach known as flipped learning has been successfully implemented. This model comprises self-directed, asynchronous pre-course learning, followed by knowledge application and skill training during in-class sessions. The existing evidence supports the effectiveness of this approach for the acquisition of cognitive skills, but it is uncertain whether the flipped classroom model is suitable for the acquisition of team skills. The objective of this study was to determine if a flipped classroom approach, with an online workshop prior to an instructor-led course could improve team performance and key resuscitation variables during classroom training. METHODS: A single-centre, cluster-randomised, rater-blinded study was conducted on 114 final year medical students at a University Hospital in Germany. The study randomly assigned students to either the intervention or control group using a computer script. Each team, regardless of group, performed two advanced life support (ALS) scenarios on a simulator. The two groups differed in the order in which they completed the flipped e-learning curriculum. The intervention group started with the e-learning component, and the control group started with an ALS scenario. Simulators were used for recording and analysing resuscitation performance indicators, while professionals assessed team performance as a primary outcome. RESULTS: The analysis was conducted on the data of 96 participants in 21 teams, comprising of 11 intervention groups and 10 control groups. The intervention teams achieved higher team performance ratings during the first scenario compared to the control teams (Estimated marginal mean of global rating: 7.5 vs 5.6, p < 0.01; performance score: 4.4 vs 3.8, p < 0.05; global score: 4.4 vs 3.7, p < 0.001). However, these differences were not observed in the second scenario, where both study groups had used the e-learning tool. CONCLUSION: Flipped classroom approaches using learner-paced e-learning prior to hands-on training can improve team performance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register ( https://drks.de/search/de/trial/DRKS00013096 ).


Assuntos
Currículo , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Ressuscitação , Humanos , Ressuscitação/educação , Feminino , Masculino , Alemanha , Competência Clínica , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes de Medicina , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Adulto , Avaliação Educacional , Treinamento por Simulação
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 462, 2024 Apr 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38671422

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Stop the Bleed (STB) training program was launched by the White House to minimize hemorrhagic deaths. Few studies focused on the STB were reported outside the United States. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a problem-, team- and evidence-based learning (PTEBL) approach to teaching, compared to traditional teaching methods currently employed in STB courses in China. METHODS: This study was a parallel group, unmasked, randomised controlled trial. We included third-year medical students of a five-year training program from the Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University who voluntarily participated in the trial. One hundred fifty-three medical students were randomized (1:1) into the PTEBL group (n = 77) or traditional group (n = 76). Every group was led by a single instructor. The instructor in the PTEBL group has experienced in educational reform. However, the instructor in the traditional group follows a traditional teaching mode. The teaching courses for both student groups had the same duration of four hours. Questionnaires were conducted to assess teaching quality before and after the course. The trial was registered in the Central South University (No. 2021JY188). RESULTS: In the PTEBL group, students reported mastery in three fundamental STB skills-Direct Finger Compression (61/77, 79.2%), Packing (72/77, 93.8%), and Tourniquet Placement (71/77, 92.2%) respectively, while 76.3% (58/76), 89.5% (68/76), and 88.2% (67/76) of students in the traditional group (P > 0.05 for each pairwise comparison). 96.1% (74/77) of students in the PTEBL group felt prepared to help in an emergency, while 90.8% (69/76) of students in the traditional group (P > 0.05). 94.8% (73/77) of students reported improved teamwork skills after the PTEBL course, in contrast with 81.6% (62/76) of students in the traditional course (P = 0.011). Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between improved clinical thinking skills and improved teamwork skills (R = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74-0.88; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the traditional teaching method, the PTEBL method was superior in teaching teamwork skills, and has equally effectively taught hemostasis techniques in the emergency setting. The PTEBL method can be introduced to the STB training in China.


Assuntos
Hemorragia , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Ensino , Humanos , Hemorragia/terapia , China , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Masculino , Estudantes de Medicina , Feminino , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos
15.
J Physician Assist Educ ; 35(2): 201-205, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38684093

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: The purposes of this educational activity were to instill in students a greater empathy for patients with intellectual developmental disabilities, give students a better understanding of how to obtain a medical history for patients with communication limitations, teach students practical tips for obtaining a medical history and physical examination to increase competence in their future practice, and to build a relationship with a local organization that serves people with intellectual disabilities. An experiential learning activity was added to the curriculum of two courses for first-year PA students to accomplish these goals. The course instructors engaged in several planning meetings with a local residential facility for people with intellectual disabilities, including choosing patients that the students would assess. The students made 3 visits to the facility. The visits included interactive lectures by a physical therapist, occupational therapist, nurse practitioner, medical doctor, and dentist. Two of the facility involved patient visits at designated homes on campus. The students then wrote comprehensive visit notes with patient identifying information removed and submitted them for grading. Students expressed feeling better prepared to assess people with intellectual disabilities and having an increased appreciation for obtaining quality medical histories. The partner facility also reported they received positive feedback from staff participants and indicated they would like to continue this partnership.


Assuntos
Deficiências do Desenvolvimento , Deficiência Intelectual , Assistentes Médicos , Humanos , Assistentes Médicos/educação , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/terapia , Competência Clínica , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/organização & administração , Anamnese , Empatia , Currículo , Exame Físico/normas
16.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 16(5): 297-299, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38594169

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Student readiness for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs) has not been explicitly defined in literature or standards. Readiness for APPEs is a programmatic requirement of all schools and colleges of pharmacy (schools), leaving schools to determine their own assessments of APPE readiness. Current literature provides no consensus on the definition of APPE readiness nor the assessments or benchmarks used to evaluate APPE readiness. Schools have an opportunity to improve efforts to identify students at risk for poor APPE performance and provide early intervention. COMMENTARY: Due to a lack of consensus, it may be easier to describe students who are not ready for APPEs than it is to describe students who are APPE ready. APPE unreadiness is defined by the authors as those who require significant preceptor instruction on foundational competencies such as knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes and therefore are unable to meaningfully engage in application-based patient care activities. By adding focus to APPE unreadiness within APPE readiness programs, pharmacy schools may be able to more readily identify and remediate students who are at risk of failing one or more APPE rotations. IMPLICATIONS: We provide four recommendations for schools to consider. These are focused on assessing APPE readiness to qualify and quantify APPE unready students. By assessing APPE unreadiness, schools can make continuous quality improvement to ensure that preceptors, sites, students, and faculty can have the ongoing confidence that APPE students are all ready to meaningfully engage on rotation.


Assuntos
Educação em Farmácia , Assistência Farmacêutica , Farmácia , Humanos , Currículo , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas
17.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2336331, 2024 Dec 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38577972

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Medical school educators face challenges determining which new and emerging topics to incorporate into medical school curricula, and how to do so. A study was conducted to gain a better understanding of the integration of emerging topics related to microbiology and immunology in the undergraduate medical curriculum (UME). METHODS: An anonymous survey with 17 questions was emailed to medical school faculty who teach immunology and/or microbiology through the DR-Ed listserv, the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Connect listserv, and attendees of the Association of Medical School Microbiology and Immunology Chairs (AMSMIC) Educational Strategies Workshop. Participants were asked about experiences, perceptions, and the decision-making process regarding integrating emerging topics into UME. RESULTS: The top emerging topics that were added to the curriculum or considered for addition in the last 10 years included COVID-19, Zika virus, mRNA vaccines, and Mpox (formerly known as monkeypox). Most respondents reported lectures and active learning as the major methods for topic delivery, with most faculty indicating that formative assessment was the best way to assess emerging topics. Content experts and course directors were the most cited individuals making these decisions. Top reasons for incorporating emerging topics into curricula included preparing students for clinical treatment of cases, followed by demonstrating the importance of basic science, and opportunities to integrate basic science into other disciplines. Challenges for incorporating these topics included making room in an already crowded curriculum, followed by content overload for students. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the rationale for integrating emerging topics related to microbiology and immunology into UME, and identifies the current new and emerging topics, as well as the main methods of integration and assessment. These results may be used by medical educators to inform curricular decisions at their institutions. Future studies will include developing innovative learning modules that overcome barriers to integration.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Infecção por Zika virus , Zika virus , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Currículo , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 388, 2024 Apr 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38594653

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Flexible hybrid teaching has become the new normal of basic medical education in the postepidemic era. Identifying ways to improve the quality of curriculum teaching and achieve high-level talent training is a complex problem that urgently needs to be solved. Over the course of the past several semesters, the research team has integrated design thinking (DT) into undergraduate teaching to identify, redesign and solve complex problems in achieving curriculum teaching and professional talent training objectives. METHODS: This study is an observational research. A total of 156 undergraduate stomatology students from Jining Medical University in 2021 were selected to participate in two rounds of online flipped teaching using the design thinking EDIPT (empathy, definition, idea, prototype, and test) method. This approach was applied specifically to the chapters on the respiratory system and female reproductive system. Data collection included student questionnaires, teacher-student interviews, and exam scores. GraphPad Prism software was used for data analysis, and the statistical method was conducted by multiple or unpaired t test. RESULTS: According to the questionnaire results, the flipped classroom teaching design developed using design thinking methods received strong support from the majority of students, with nearly 80% of students providing feedback that they developed multiple abilities during the study process. The interview results indicated that teachers generally believed that using design thinking methods to understand students' real needs, define teaching problems, and devise instructional design solutions, along with testing and promptly adjusting the effectiveness through teaching practices, played a highly positive role in improving teaching and student learning outcomes. A comparison of exam scores showed a significant improvement in the exam scores of the class of 2021 stomatology students in the flipped teaching chapters compared to the class of 2020 stomatology students, and this difference was statistically significant. However, due to the limitation of the experimental chapter scope, there was no significant difference in the overall course grades. CONCLUSION: The study explores the application of design thinking in histology and embryology teaching, revealing its positive impact on innovative teaching strategies and students' learning experience in medical education. Online flipped teaching, developed through design thinking, proves to be an effective and flexible method that enhances student engagement and fosters autonomous learning abilities.


Assuntos
Currículo , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Humanos , Feminino , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Aprendizagem , Estudantes , Inquéritos e Questionários , Ensino
19.
West J Emerg Med ; 25(2): 155-159, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38596911

RESUMO

Background: Training programs for advanced practice providers (APP) often have significant variability in their curriculum, including electrocardiogram (ECG) education. Despite limitations in formal ECG training, APPs in the emergency department (ED) may be the first practitioner to interpret an ECG. Foundations of Emergency Medicine (FoEM) offers free, open-access curricula that are widely used for resident education. We sought to improve APP ECG interpretation skills by implementing the FoEM ECG I course. Methods: This was a single-site, pre- and post-intervention study of 23 APPs at our high-acuity, urban ED. In the fall of 2020, APP learners enrolled in a FoEM ECG I course led by faculty and senior resident instructors. The course consisted of six virtual, small-group, active-learning ECG workshops. Participants completed a 15-question multiple-choice test before, immediately after, and six months post-intervention to quantify knowledge acquisition. Additionally, a pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitudes, and practices survey was administered on ECG interpretation skills and to evaluate the course. We evaluated change in ECG knowledge scores using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Changes in self-assessed knowledge were evaluated using an ordinal logistic mixed-effects regression. Results: A total of 23 APPs enrolled in the course. Knowledge assessments showed APPs improved from the pre-test (median 9/15, interquartile range [IQR] 7-11) to the post-test (median 12/15, IQR 10-13; P = 0.001). Test scores did not significantly change from the post-test to the delayed post-test (median 12/15, IQR 12-13; P = 0.30). Respondents' subjective rating of their skill did not significantly change (P = 0.06). Respondents reported no change in their likelihood of approaching an attending when uncertain of the correct interpretation of an ECG (P = 0.16). Overall, 91% were satisfied with the course and 96% agreed that the course difficulty was appropriate. Conclusion: The FoEM ECG course provided a standardized curriculum that improved APP knowledge for interpreting ECGs. Despite this, the course did not alter APPs' willingness to approach physicians for guidance with interpretation of abnormal ECGs. These findings may inform expansion of this concept for other programs who desire formalized APP ECG education.


Assuntos
Currículo , Eletrocardiografia , Humanos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Competência Clínica
20.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301728, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38603715

RESUMO

AR technology allows users to interact with virtual objects in real-world settings. Immersive AR experiences can enhance creativity and possibilities. Learners can explore real-life situations in a safe, controlled environment, understand abstract concepts and solve problems. This study investigates whether AR-codes affect boxing beginners' performance in some fundamental defensive techniques. An experimental and control group were created to implement a quasi-experimental design. By using the ASSURE instructional design model, AR technology was incorporated into the educational program and delivered in flipped classroom method to the experimental group. Comparatively, the control group is taught a program using a teacher's command style. A post-measurement of defensive boxing skills was conducted for both groups. Participants were 60 boxing beginners aged 12 to 14 who had enrolled in Port Fouad Sports Club's 2023/2024 training season in Port Said, Egypt. Randomly, participants were divided into control and experimental groups. They were homogenized and equivalent in terms of age, height, weight, IQ, physical fitness, and skill level. According to the study results, the experimental group performed better in post-measurements than the control group. The AR Codes technology had a large effect size on the learning of boxing defensive skills under study. Consequently, it is necessary to use AR Codes technology as an educational resource to enhance the learning process, integrate it with active learning strategies, and use it to teach defensive boxing skills and apply them to offensive and counterattack skills, thereby improving the learning process.


Assuntos
Realidade Aumentada , Boxe , Humanos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Escolaridade
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