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3.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(9): 514-517, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32865585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic brought mandatory shelter-in-place orders, disrupting traditional face-to-face teaching methods for advanced practice fellowship programs nationally, creating a challenge for fellowship program directors to preserve curriculum using nontraditional methods. METHOD: Using a variety of both web-based and app-based virtual platforms, a nationally accredited fellowship program converted traditional in-seat learning modalities to elearning platforms using both synchronous and asynchronous education. RESULTS: Preliminary data indicate that knowledge acquisition and perceived fellow satisfaction are preserved despite the abrupt change to program delivery. Programmatic modifications were submitted to the American Nurse Credentialing Center for compliance and deemed as creative, innovative, and collaborative. CONCLUSION: Curriculum for advanced practice fellowship programs can be favorably converted to elearning using virtual platforms during a crisis. Through prompt reevaluation and restructuring, virtual platforms can replace in-seat didactic lectures, patient case studies, mentoring, and even simulation, while ensuring program continuation and compliance with accreditation standards. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(9):514-517.].


Assuntos
Prática Avançada de Enfermagem/educação , Currículo , Educação a Distância/organização & administração , Bolsas de Estudo/organização & administração , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Pesquisa em Educação de Enfermagem , Pesquisa em Avaliação de Enfermagem , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
5.
J Cancer Educ ; 35(5): 1034-1040, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32888144

RESUMO

In response to the COVID-19 social distancing guidelines, residency and fellowship programs transitioned to virtual instruction to deliver didactics and continue with medical education. The efficacy of such a fully online learning environment, however, remains unknown. To investigate its impact on medical education, this study surveyed hematology/oncology fellows at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center on their attitudes regarding the online-based lecture program. Fellows were emailed a 19-question survey with questions on demographics, ease of technical access to the online platform, level of comfort with participation, knowledge acquisition, wellness, and COVID-19-specific coverage. A free-text question soliciting ways to improve upon online learning was also included. The response rate was 71% (30/42). Most respondents reported easy/very easy accessibility to the online environment. Seventy-seven percent of the participants did not experience a technical issue. Seventy percent felt comfortable/very comfortable with participating in the conference. Thirty-seven percent felt comfortable/very comfortable with actively offering an answer to questions during the interactive board review session. Eighty-seven percent would have been more willing to offer an answer during the board review session if an anonymous poll format was utilized. Sixty-three percent felt they learned the same amount as they typically do during an in-person session. Thirty-three percent reported they were less focused as compared with an in-person session. One hundred percent of the participants had their questions answered, either at all times (87%) or sometimes (13%). Sixty percent experienced a change in social interactions as compared with an in-person session. Fifty-four percent reported that it was easy/very to balance online attendance despite personal/family commitments. One hundred percent appreciated the flexibility of the online learning environment. Ninety percent felt safer at home attending these lectures compared with receiving these lectures in-person during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, most fellows felt comfortable with the transition to a fully online learning environment. Strategies to encourage active participation, enhance social interaction, and provide additional flexibility are still needed.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação a Distância , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo , Hematologia/educação , Oncologia/educação , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Betacoronavirus , Feminino , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Texas
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 715, 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993542

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women are under-represented in many mid-career infectious diseases research fellowships, including a TDR fellowship for low- and middle-income country (LMIC) researchers. TDR solicited creative ideas as part of a challenge contest to increase the number of women fellowship applicants. The purpose of this study is to examine themes from submitted ideas and the impact of implementing the top three ideas on the number of women applicants. METHODS: We solicited ideas for modifying the TDR fellowship using a crowdsourcing challenge. Then we used a mixed methods approach to evaluate texts submitted in response to the challenge. The qualitative analysis identified themes from eligible submissions. The quantitative analysis examined the mean score (1-10 scale) assigned to submitted ideas and also the number of eligible women applicants before (2014-7) and after (2018) implementing the top three ideas. RESULTS: We received 311 ideas on improving women's participation in this fellowship from 63 countries. Among all ideas, 282 (91%) were from women and 286 (92%) were from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Thirty-three (17%) ideas received an overall mean score of 7.0 or greater. The top three ideas included enhanced social media communication targeting women, improving career mentorship, and creating a nomination system to nudge women applicants. These ideas were implemented as part of the 2018 fellowship application cycle. The number of eligible women applicants increased from 11 in 2016 to 48 in 2018. The number of eligible men applicants increased from 55 in 2016 to 114 in 2018. Women represent 44% (8/18) of the 2018 cohort. CONCLUSION: This suggests that the challenge contest resulted in strong participation from women in LMICs. The three top ideas likely contributed to a greater number of women applicants to this mid-career fellowship. Further ways of enhancing women's participation in global health training are needed.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis , Crowdsourcing/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo , Pesquisadores , Mulheres Trabalhadoras , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Comunicação , Feminino , Saúde Global , Mão de Obra em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Mentores , Pesquisa Qualitativa
8.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32942794

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Telemedicina/tendências , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Assistência à Saúde/métodos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo/tendências , Humanos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Internato e Residência/tendências , Masculino , Telemedicina/métodos
9.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S433-S438, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32942798

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While the COVID-19 pandemic still rages on in the United States, leaving in its wake hundreds of thousands of infected patients, families shattered by the untimely death of their loved ones, an economy in free fall that hit all-time highs barely a few months ago, and a fearful citizenry unsure of what the future holds, the effect it has had on residency and fellowship training programs across the country may appear inconsequential to the general populace. However, if you are a graduating trainee confronted with this unusual set of circumstances, fear of the virus is not the only thing that is foremost in your mind. METHODS: Literature review. RESULTS: We discuss the unique challenges our pain fellowship program continues to deal with during this pandemic and particularly its impact on our fellows. It is entirely likely these concerns are mirrored in academic programs all over the United States. LIMITATIONS: A narrative review with paucity of literature.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Bolsas de Estudo , Manejo da Dor , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Estados Unidos
10.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 136: 110217, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32797806

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To gain a better understanding of the effects the COVID-19 pandemic has had on current and future pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training, as well as how the application process was impacted this past year. METHODS: An anonymous web-based survey consisting of 24 questions was sent to all fellowship directors. The survey questions were designed to gain a better understanding of the effects of the current COVID-19 pandemic on the surgical and clinical experience of current, to characterize the types of supplemental educational experiences that fellowship directors had incorporated into the curriculum to compensate for the decreased surgical and clinical workload, and highlight differences based on geographic location. RESULTS: Overall, 22 of 36 fellowship directors responded to our survey, for a total response rate of 61%. The Midwest had the highest response rate at 72.7%, followed by the Northeast (71.4%), the West (50%), and the South (50%). The vast majority of fellowship directors (77.2%) reported the COVID-19 pandemic had a "significant impact" on overall pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training. 86.3% of fellowship directors reported that their programs were still performing some surgical operations, but with decreased overall volume. Interestingly, 13.6% of fellowship directors reported that their fellows had been pulled to medicine or ICU services to assist with the COVID-19 pandemic. Of these programs that had a fellow pulled to the ICU or medicine service, 2 out of 3 were located in the Northeast, with the remaining fellow being from a program in the South. CONCLUSION: Overall, pediatric otolaryngology fellowship directors reported the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the overall fellowship experience within the field of pediatric otolaryngology, with the majority feeling that both their fellows surgical and clinical experience have been significantly impacted.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Otolaringologia/educação , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Criança , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(2): 217e-220e, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32740601

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The gender disparity between the number of female and male chairs and program directors has been previously established. The aim of this study was to determine whether any differences in objective credentials existed between male and female plastic surgery department chairs/division chiefs and program directors. METHODS: Information about each plastic surgery program director and chair/chief was extracted from the websites of all institutions affiliated with a plastic surgery residency program. For each individual, information about the length of their career, number of fellowships completed, and number of publications was recorded. The two-tailed t test was used to compare differences between male and female chairs and program directors. RESULTS: A total of 99 chairs were recorded, of which nine (9.1 percent) were female. Of the 99 program directors, 13 (13.1 percent) were female. There was no difference in the number of years in practice or number of fellowships between men and women for either position. On average, male chairs had significantly fewer publications than female chairs (71.9 versus 128; p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of publications between male and female program directors. Compared to program directors, chairs had significantly more years in practice and numbers of publications, which held true for both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Women are not only underrepresented in the department chair and program director positions, but also possess higher qualifications that may reflect differences in standards for promotion and appointment. Additional research is needed to elucidate the reasons behind the observed differences in qualifications.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Seleção de Pessoal/ética , Sexismo , Cirurgia Plástica/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Bolsas de Estudo/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/ética , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Liderança , Masculino , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Cirurgia Plástica/ética , Cirurgia Plástica/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(19): e860-e864, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732495

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate resident, fellow, and attending perspectives on the use of e-learning as part of orthopaedic surgery education. METHODS: A survey was created evaluating (1) overall attitudes toward e-learning, (2) multi-institutional e-learning/e-conferences, (3) national/regional e-conferences, and (4) future directions with e-learning. The survey was distributed to all the orthopaedic surgery residency program directors in the United States, and they were asked to circulate the survey to their program's faculty and trainees. RESULTS: A total of 268 responses were collected, including 100 attendings and 168 trainees. Overall satisfaction with e-learning compared with in-person learning was higher among trainees than attending faculty, with 51.4% of trainees favoring e-learning, as opposed to 32.2% of attendings (P = 0.006). Both groups felt they were more likely to pay attention with in-person learning (P = 0.89). During the COVID-19 pandemic, 85.7% of residents have used e-learning platforms to join a conference in their specialty of interest while off-service. Most attendings and trainees felt e-learning should play a supplemental role in standard residency/fellowship education, with a low number of respondents feeling that it should not be used (86.6% versus 84%, and 2.1% versus 0.6%, respectively, P = 0.28). CONCLUSION: E-learning has been an important modality to continue academic pursuits during the disruption in usual education and training schedules during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most trainees and attendings surveyed felt that e-learning should play a supplementary role in resident and fellow education moving forward. Although e-learning does provide an opportunity to hold multi-institutional conferences and makes participation in meetings logistically easier, it cannot fully replicate the dynamic interactions and benefits of in-person learning.


Assuntos
Instrução por Computador/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo/tendências , Internato e Residência/tendências , Ortopedia/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Bolsas de Estudo/métodos , Feminino , Previsões , Humanos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/educação , Ortopedia/tendências , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Quarentena/psicologia , Estados Unidos
15.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 50(10): e13367, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32735699

RESUMO

Producing excellent physician scientists starts with the active discovery of talent and dedication, supported by the strong belief that physician involvement in biomedical research is essential to make fundamental discoveries that improve human health. The revolution of surgical and interventional therapy of structural heart disease has had 'profoundly positive effects on survival and quality of life over the decades. (…) Small increments in clinical improvement will still be possible in the future, but for the most part, the potential for major advancement using these techniques has been exhausted' (Frank Hanley, MD; Stanford). Personalized medicine, rapid genetic diagnostics, RNA and extracellular vesicle biology, epigenetics, gene editing, gene and stem cell-derived therapy are exemplary areas where specialized training for paediatric/congenital cardiology physician scientists will be increasingly needed to further advance the field. About a decade ago, a series in Circulation discussed academic career models and highlighted the major challenges facing the cardiovascular 'clinician scientist' (syn. physician scientist), which have not abated since. To develop the skills and expertise in both clinical congenital cardiology and basic research, the training of fellows must be focused and integrated. The current pandemic COVID-19 puts additional pressure and hurdles on fellows-in-training (FIT) and early career investigators (ECI) who aim to establish, consolidate or expand their own research group. Here, we discuss the major challenges, opportunities and necessary changes for academic institutions to sustain and recruit physician scientists in paediatric/congenital cardiology in the years to come.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica , Cardiologistas/provisão & distribução , Escolha da Profissão , Cardiopatias Congênitas/terapia , Pediatras/provisão & distribução , Seleção de Pessoal , Pesquisadores/provisão & distribução , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Betacoronavirus , Cardiologistas/educação , Cardiologia/educação , Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Pandemias , Pediatras/educação , Pediatria/educação , Pneumonia Viral , Pesquisadores/educação
16.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 41(5): 317-319, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32769847

RESUMO

In the decade since the Institute of Medicine published the Future of Nursing report, the development of a pipeline of doctorally prepared nursing leaders proficient in research, leadership, teaching, and practice has been one of great successes. The investment of Jonas Philanthropies, in collaboration with donors and foundation partners, has supported scholarships to more than 1,000 scholars nationwide. Scholars are prepared to lead health care reform in education, practice, and leadership. This article shares four examples of creative approaches to teaching health policy with students and professionals who may inspire similarly creative approaches to prepare future health policy leaders.


Assuntos
Política de Saúde , Liderança , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos
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