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1.
J Hist Ideas ; 85(2): 289-320, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38708650

RESUMO

This article explores the uses of utopian rhetoric of food plenty in Italian colonial visions before the First World War. It examines the travel writings of three leading Italian journalists, Enrico Corradini, Arnaldo Fraccaroli, and Giuseppe Bevione, who visited the Ottoman provinces of Tripolitania and Cyrenaica and campaigned for their colonization by Liberal Italy. By reconstructing their utopian rhetoric of food plenty, this article seeks to show the relevance of arguments about food and agriculture produce to early twentieth century colonial visions, shedding light on an aspect of Italian political thought that has been hitherto marginalized in existing historical scholarship.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Itália , História do Século XX , Colonialismo/história , Utopias/história , Agricultura/história , Abastecimento de Alimentos/história , Império Otomano
2.
Technol Cult ; 65(1): 63-87, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38661794

RESUMO

This article questions the economic rationale of colonial experimentation and prison labor, arguing that for many administrators a prison-based experiment's success mattered less than its existence. It examines the position of convict labor and penal discipline within colonial industrial experiments in colonial India, where convicts performed experiments for what one administrator described as "the most penal" form of labor, papermaking. The belief that Indian fibers could open a new export market for global papermaking meant that prisons became prominent sites of experimentation with new pulps. Regional prisons gained state monopolies for handmade paper, often decimating local independent producers. Yet prison and industrial officers counterintuitively positioned the frequent failures of papermaking experiments as a continuing potential source for industrial improvement. They argued that the failures demonstrated the need to improve discipline and supervision. Prison experiments slotted convicts into repetitive, mechanized roles that served European investigations into the utility of Indian products.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Índia , Colonialismo/história , História do Século XX , Prisões/história , Papel/história , História do Século XXI , Indústrias/história , Humanos
3.
Int J Drug Policy ; 126: 104368, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38452423

RESUMO

There have been several recent commentaries which have highlighted the relevance of the postcolonial perspective to drug prohibition and called for the decolonisation of drug policy (Daniels et al., 2021; Hillier, Winkler & Lavallée, 2020; Lasco, 2022; Mills, 2019). While these are significant interventions in the field, sparse drugs scholarship has engaged more directly with well-developed literature and concepts from Critical Indigenous Studies (Moreton-Robinson, 2016) and Indigenous Standpoint Theory (Moreton-Robinson, 2013; Nakata, 2007) and reflected on its applicability to the drug and alcohol field. In contrast to the postcolonial perspective, which understands colonisation as a historical event with contemporary impacts, Indigenous scholarship conceptualises colonisation as an active and ongoing part of how the settler-state continues to impose itself. From this vantage point I explore coloniality as a system of power and reflect on the way prohibition acts as a key arm of the settler-colonial state. The paper explores the way concepts like vulnerability, marginality, overrepresentation, disproportionality and addiction involve colonial violence, knowledge practices and narratives which are central to the way coloniality is maintained and continues to assert itself in contemporary settler societies.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Humanos , Controle de Medicamentos e Entorpecentes/legislação & jurisprudência , Povos Indígenas
4.
Lancet ; 403(10433): 1304-1308, 2024 Mar 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38555135

RESUMO

The historical and contemporary alignment of medical and health journals with colonial practices needs elucidation. Colonialism, which sought to exploit colonised people and places, was justified by the prejudice that colonised people's ways of knowing and being are inferior to those of the colonisers. Institutions for knowledge production and dissemination, including academic journals, were therefore central to sustaining colonialism and its legacies today. This invited Viewpoint focuses on The Lancet, following its 200th anniversary, and is especially important given the extent of The Lancet's global influence. We illuminate links between The Lancet and colonialism, with examples from the past and present, showing how the journal legitimised and continues to promote specific types of knowers, knowledge, perspectives, and interpretations in health and medicine. The Lancet's role in colonialism is not unique; other institutions and publications across the British empire cooperated with empire-building through colonisation. We therefore propose investigations and raise questions to encourage broader contestation on the practices, audience, positionality, and ownership of journals claiming leadership in global knowledge production.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Preconceito , Humanos , Colonialismo/história , Liderança , Conhecimento
5.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 7-16, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38415777

RESUMO

In this special issue, we invited contributions that critically examined issues of imperialism, colonialism, power, justice, etc. to expand the canon of anticolonial scholarship and critical scholarship in community psychology. Our two objectives were: (1) to build on the canon of anticolonial and critical race scholarship to cultivate an empirical and theoretical body of work and conceptual frameworks about racism and colonialism within the field of community psychology and (2) to unpack the different manifestations of racism in society from the lens of community psychology and reflect on the implications of these varied forms of injustice in the contemporary moment. Rooted in African epistemology and methodology (Martin, 2012), we find the concept of the algorithm to serve as a potent metaphor for the ways in which these oppressive structures operate given the prevalence of algorithms in our daily lives and the algorithm is symbolic of the information age and predictive powers that seem to govern society beyond conscious control. In this sense, imperial algorithms are these structures, patterns, processes, and procedures that perpetuate imperialism. These imperial algorithms manifest as neo-colonialism, surveillance, social engineering, carcerality, reality warping of contemporary racism, health disparities exacerbated by COVID-19, and environmental grids of oppression.


Assuntos
Racismo , Humanos , Racismo/psicologia , Colonialismo
6.
BMJ Glob Health ; 9(2)2024 02 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38413105

RESUMO

The advancement of digital technologies has stimulated immense excitement about the possibilities of transforming healthcare, especially in resource-constrained contexts. For many, this rapid growth presents a 'digital health revolution'. While this is true, there are also dangers that the proliferation of digital health in the global south reinforces existing colonialities. Underpinned by the rhetoric of modernity, rationality and progress, many countries in the global south are pushing for digital health transformation in ways that ignore robust regulation, increase commercialisation and disregard local contexts, which risks heightened inequalities. We propose a decolonial agenda for digital health which shifts the liner and simplistic understanding of digital innovation as the magic wand for health justice. In our proposed approach, we argue for both conceptual and empirical reimagination of digital health agendas in ways that centre indigenous and intersectional theories. This enables the prioritisation of local contexts and foregrounds digital health regulatory infrastructures as a possible site of both struggle and resistance. Our decolonial digital health agenda critically reflects on who is benefitting from digital health systems, centres communities and those with lived experiences and finally introduces robust regulation to counter the social harms of digitisation.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Saúde Digital , Humanos , Atenção à Saúde
7.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 48(2): 100132, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38422582

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This research sought to expand on a set of core Maori hauora a-iwi/public health competencies initially designed for teaching and to enable their use in workplaces. METHODS: The research used a kaupapa Maori methodology in four stages including the development of draft levels of competence for all core competencies, consultation hui (meetings), analysis of feedback and redrafting, and respondent validation. RESULTS: Key themes elicited in relation to the content of the competencies included increasing language expectations, the importance of strength-based approaches and self-determination, and the need for individual responsibility to address structural racism. Reflective practice was identified as a fundamental cross-cutting competency. Participants suggested planetary health and political ideologies be included as additional socio-political determinants of health with equity impacts. Key concerns related to the application of the competency document included the need for cultural safety and ensuring that all public health practitioners are 'seen'. CONCLUSIONS: The Maori hauora a-iwi/public health competencies have been published under a Creative Commons licence. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: The process of drafting a set of Maori public health competencies elicited key themes potentially relevant for public health practice in other countries and resulted in a competency document for use by universities and workplaces.


Assuntos
Competência Cultural , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Saúde Pública , Racismo , Humanos , Racismo/prevenção & controle , Nova Zelândia , Competência Profissional , Colonialismo , Antirracismo , Povo Maori
9.
World Neurosurg ; 185: 314-319, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38403018

RESUMO

Since the first African country attained independence from colonial rule, surgical training on the continent has evolved along 3 principal models. The first is a colonial, local master-apprentice model, the second is a purely local training model, and the third is a collegiate intercountry model. The 3 models exist currently and there are varied perceptions of their relative merits in training competent neurosurgeons. We reviewed the historical development of training and in an accompanying study, seek to describe the complex array of surgical training pathways and explore the neocolonial underpinnings of how these various models of training impact today the development of surgical capacity in Africa. In addition, we sought to better understand how some training systems may contribute to the widely recognized "brain drain" of surgeons from the African continent to high income countries in Europe and North America. To date, there are no published studies evaluating the impact of surgical training systems on skilled workforce emigration out of Africa. This review aims to discover potentially addressable sources of improving healthcare and training equity in this region.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Neurocirurgia , África , Humanos , Neurocirurgia/educação , História do Século XX , Neurocirurgiões/educação , Emigração e Imigração/tendências , História do Século XXI
10.
Bull World Health Organ ; 102(2): 130-136, 2024 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38313156

RESUMO

Colonialism, which involves the systemic domination of lands, markets, peoples, assets, cultures or political institutions to exploit, misappropriate and extract wealth and resources, affects health in many ways. In recent years, interest has grown in the decolonization of global health with a focus on correcting power imbalances between high-income and low-income countries and on challenging ideas and values of some wealthy countries that shape the practice of global health. We argue that decolonization of global health must also address the relationship between global health actors and contemporary forms of colonialism, in particular the current forms of corporate and financialized colonialism that operate through globalized systems of wealth extraction and profiteering. We present a three-part agenda for action that can be taken to decolonize global health. The first part relates to the power asymmetries that exist between global health actors from high-income and historically privileged countries and their counterparts in low-income and marginalized settings. The second part concerns the colonization of the structures and systems of global health governance itself. The third part addresses how colonialism occurs through the global health system. Addressing all forms of colonialism calls for a political and economic anticolonialism as well as social decolonization aimed at ensuring greater national, racial, cultural and knowledge diversity within the structures of global health.


Le colonialisme, qui implique la domination systémique de terres, de marchés, de peuples, de ressources, de cultures ou d'institutions politiques dans le but d'exploiter, de détourner et d'extraire des richesses et des ressources, affecte la santé de nombreuses manières. Ces dernières années, la décolonisation de la santé mondiale a suscité un intérêt croissant, l'accent étant mis sur la correction des déséquilibres de pouvoir entre les pays à revenu élevé et les pays à faible revenu, ainsi que sur la remise en question des idées et des valeurs de certains pays riches qui façonnent la pratique de la santé mondiale. Nous soutenons que la décolonisation de la santé mondiale doit également aborder la relation entre les acteurs de la santé mondiale et les formes contemporaines de colonialisme, en particulier les formes actuelles de colonialisme d'entreprise et de colonialisme financiarisé qui opèrent par des systèmes mondialisés d'extraction de richesses et de profits. Nous présentons un programme d'action en trois parties destiné à décoloniser la santé mondiale. La première partie porte sur les asymétries de pouvoir existant entre les acteurs de la santé mondiale des pays à hauts revenus et historiquement privilégiés et leurs homologues des pays à faibles revenus et marginalisés. La deuxième partie concerne la colonisation des structures et des systèmes de la gouvernance mondiale de la santé elle-même. La troisième partie traite de la manière dont le colonialisme se manifeste à travers le système de santé mondial. La lutte contre toutes les formes de colonialisme nécessite un anticolonialisme politique et économique ainsi qu'une décolonisation sociale visant à garantir une plus grande diversité nationale, raciale, culturelle et des connaissances au sein des structures de la santé mondiale.


El colonialismo, que implica la dominación sistémica de tierras, mercados, pueblos, bienes, culturas o instituciones políticas para explotar, apropiarse indebidamente y extraer riqueza y recursos, afecta a la salud de muchas maneras. En los últimos años ha crecido el interés por descolonizar la salud mundial, en particular para corregir los desequilibrios de poder entre los países de ingresos altos y los de ingresos bajos, y para cuestionar las ideas y los valores de algunos países ricos que influyen en la práctica de la salud mundial. Sostenemos que la descolonización de la salud mundial también debe abordar la relación entre los actores de la salud mundial y las formas contemporáneas de colonialismo, en especial las formas actuales de colonialismo corporativo y financiarizado que operan a través de sistemas globalizados de extracción de riqueza y especulación. Presentamos un programa de acción dividido en tres partes para descolonizar la salud mundial. La primera parte se refiere a las asimetrías de poder que existen entre los actores de la salud mundial procedentes de países de ingresos altos e históricamente privilegiados y sus homólogos de entornos de ingresos bajos y marginados. La segunda parte se refiere a la colonización de las estructuras y sistemas de la propia gobernanza de la salud mundial. La tercera parte aborda cómo se produce el colonialismo a través del sistema sanitario mundial. Abordar todas las formas de colonialismo exige un anticolonialismo político y económico, así como una descolonización social destinada a garantizar una mayor diversidad nacional, racial, cultural y de conocimientos dentro de las estructuras de la salud mundial.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Saúde Global , Humanos , Renda , Pobreza , Organizações
11.
BMJ Glob Health ; 9(1)2024 01 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38176746

RESUMO

Coloniality in global health manifests as systemic inequalities, not based on merit, that benefit one group at the expense of another. Global surgery seeks to advance equity by inserting surgery into the global health agenda; however, it inherits the biases in global health. As a diverse group of global surgery practitioners, we aimed to examine inequities in global surgery. Using a structured, iterative, group Delphi consensus-building process drawing on the literature and our lived experiences, we identified five categories of non-merit inequalities in global surgery. These include Western epistemology, geographies of inequity, unequal participation, resource extraction, and asymmetric power and control. We observed that global surgery is dominated by Western biomedicine, characterised by the lack of interprofessional and interspecialty collaboration, incorporation of Indigenous medical systems, and social, cultural, and environmental contexts. Global surgery is Western-centric and exclusive, with a unidirectional flow of personnel from the Global North to the Global South. There is unequal participation by location (Global South), gender (female), specialty (obstetrics and anaesthesia) and profession ('non-specialists', non-clinicians, patients and communities). Benefits, such as funding, authorship and education, mostly flow towards the Global North. Institutions in the Global North have disproportionate control over priority setting, knowledge production, funding and standards creation. This naturalises inequities and masks upstream resource extraction. Guided by these five categories, we concluded that shifting global surgery towards equity entails building inclusive, pluralist, polycentric models of surgical care by providers who represent the community, with resource controlled and governance driven by communities in each setting.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Saúde Global , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios , Humanos
12.
World Neurosurg ; 185: e299-e303, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38244680

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As a result of gradual independence from colonial rule over the course of the past century, Africa has developed and evolved 3 primary surgical training structures: an extracontinental colonial model, an intracontinental college-based model, and several smaller national or local models. There is consistent evidence of international brain drain of surgical trainees and an unequal continental distribution of surgeons; however there has not, to date, been an evaluation of the impact colonialism on the evolution of surgical training on the continent. This study aims to identify the etiologies and consequences of this segmentation of surgical training in Africa. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional survey of the experience and perspectives of surgical training by current African trainees and graduates. RESULTS: A surgeon's region of residence was found to have a statistically significant positive association with that of a surgeon's training structure (P <0.001). A surgeon's professional college or structure of residency has a significantly positive association with desire to complete subspecialty training (P = 0.008). College and structure of residency also are statistically significantly associated with successful completion of subspecialty training (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide evidence to support the concept that the segmentation of surgical training structures in Africa, which is the direct result of prior colonization, has affected the distribution of trainees and specialists across the continent and the globe. This maldistribution of African surgical trainees directly impacts patient care, as the surgeon-patient ratios in many African countries are insufficient. These inequities should be acknowledged addressed and rectified to ensure that patients in Africa receive timely and appropriate surgical care.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Internato e Residência , Humanos , África , Estudos Transversais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Cirurgiões/educação , Neurocirurgia/educação
13.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 57-65, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37070791

RESUMO

In the midst of recent protests and antiracism movements following the death of George Floyd in May of 2020 and other Black, Indigenous, and people of Color (BIPOC) murdered in the United States by police violence, protestors and advocates around the world recognized the need for Western governments and other institutions to reckon with their own imperial history-to acknowledge the linkage between the slave trade, colonialism, and racism in their countries. This recognition led to the tearing down of statues depicting racist colonial leaders and calling for museums who have perpetuated imperialism and racism through their acceptance and display of looted artifacts to return them. This article sought to answer the question posed in the call for papers, can the many manifestations of racism be effectively dealt with in our society if the status quo is unwilling to engage with the issues, address them, and relinquish power. Further the author argues that cultural looting has its roots in colonialism and racism and discusses implications of the linkage between one's stolen cultural heritage and individual and community well-being. Answers to the question include both yes, manifestations of racism can be addressed, and no, they cannot be addressed when institutions and governments refuse to engage, address the issue and do not relinquish power. The article also includes the author's thoughts on using a living heritage approach to preserve cultural heritage and offers suggestions that community psychologists, advocates and activists can help to decolonize museums as part of the broader social and racial justice movement.


Assuntos
Racismo , Humanos , Artefatos , Museus , Colonialismo , Polícia
14.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 159-169, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36912117

RESUMO

Historically, atrocities against Black, Indigenous, and Women of Color's (BIWoC) reproductive rights have been committed and continue to take place in contemporary society. The atrocities against BIWoC have been fueled by White supremacy ideology of the "desirable race" and colonial views toward controlling poverty and population growth, particularly that of "undesirable" races and ethnicities. Grounded in Critical Race Theory, this paper aims to provide a critical analysis of historical and contemporary violations of BIWoC reproductive rights; discuss interventions based on empowerment and advocacy principles designed to promote women's reproductive justice; and discuss implications for future research, action, and policy from the lenses of Critical Race Theory and Community Psychology. This paper contributes to the special issue by critically analyzing historical and contemporary racism and colonialism against BIWoC, discussing implications for future research and practice, and making policy recommendations.


Assuntos
Negro ou Afro-Americano , Justiça Social , Feminino , Humanos , Clorexidina , Colonialismo , Etnicidade , Pigmentação da Pele , Povos Indígenas
15.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 216-233, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37058286

RESUMO

Indigenous peoples around the world suffer from health disparities attributed to a plethora of risk factors and social determinants of health stemming from colonialism and systemic oppression. Community-based health interventions have been identified as a means for addressing and reducing Indigenous health disparities by allowing for Indigenous sovereignty to be respected and centered. However, sovereignty relating to Indigenous health and well-being is underresearched. The present article explores the role of sovereignty in Indigenous community-based health interventions. A qualitative metasynthesis was conducted among 14 primary research studies co-authored by Indigenous people describing and evaluating Indigenous community-based health interventions. Five conceptual themes emerged as aspects of sovereignty which benefit Indigenous health and well-being outcomes: integration of culture; relocation of knowledge; connectedness; self-actualization; and stewardship. Implications are discussed, with the goal of creating a decolonial framework rooted in Indigenous epistemologies and perspectives for how sovereignty impacts Indigenous health, as well as strengthening a clear need for further research on and praxis of sovereignty in Indigenous healthcare.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Saúde Pública , Humanos , Povos Indígenas , Conhecimento , Motivação
16.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 118-132, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37058358

RESUMO

There is growing recognition that often well-intended climate action solutions perpetuate and exacerbate manifestations of colonialism and racism due to the lack of equity and justice considerations in designing and implementing these solutions. There is limited research exploring why the integration of these considerations are lacking in municipal climate action planning. This exploratory descriptive qualitative study explored how municipal actors perceive and understand equity and justice in municipal climate action planning as a step toward addressing this issue. Semistructured interviews were conducted with seven members of the core management group from ClimateAction Waterloo region, and a template analysis of the interview data resulted in six themes. Findings suggested that those involved in municipal climate action planning understand and perceive justice and equity considerations as important to their work, however, translating this understanding to practice is a challenge due to structural (governmental and societal) and capacity (limited time, funding, resources, and knowledge) barriers. By better understanding how key actors consider justice and equity, we identify shifting colonial mental models as a potential pathway for transformative change given the central role of these actors.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Racismo , Humanos , Conhecimento , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Justiça Social
17.
J Biosoc Sci ; 56(3): 413-425, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38018165

RESUMO

This study focuses on analysing the heights of 10,953 Korean men aged 20 to 40 years who were measured during the Joseon dynasty, the Japanese colonialisation period, and the contemporary period, the latter including both North and South Korea. This study thus provides rare long-term statistical evidence on how biological living standards have developed over several centuries, encompassing Confucianism, colonialism, capitalism, and communism. Using error bar analysis of heights for each historical sample period, this study confirms that heights rose as economic performance improved. For instance, economically poorer North Koreans were expectedly shorter, by about 6 cm, than their peers living in the developed South. Similarly, premodern inhabitants of present-day South Korea, who produced a gross domestic product (GDP) per capita below the world average, were about 4 cm shorter than contemporary South Koreans, who have a mean income above the world average. Along similar lines, North Koreans, who have a GDP per capita akin to that of the premodern Joseon dynasty, have not improved much in height. On the contrary, mean heights of North Koreans were even slightly below (by about 2.4 cm) heights of Joseon dynasty Koreans. All in all, the heights follow a U-shaped pattern across time, wherein heights were lowest during the colonial era. Heights bounced back to Joseon dynasty levels during the interwar period, a time period where South Korea benefitted from international aid, only to rise again and surpass even premodern levels under South Korea's flourishing market economy.


Assuntos
Capitalismo , Colonialismo , Masculino , Humanos , Colonialismo/história , Comunismo , Confucionismo , República da Coreia , Fatores Socioeconômicos
18.
Integr Psychol Behav Sci ; 58(1): 12-22, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37291446

RESUMO

In this article, the authors argue for a decolonial history of psychology that will assist in the creation of psychologies (and their histories) that are true to place and time. We briefly place contemporary history of psychology as being of service to hegemonic psychology, which has continued to enforce a coloniality of being, knowing, and doing. We outline some of its limitations in regard to individualism, neoliberalism, and the ideologies of the market. In contrast, we articulate a way to begin to reconceptualize a psychology and its history that may serve to honor and respect multiple ways of knowing and being. We offer examples of emergent approaches that are being created that are non-dualistic, non-WEIRD, and focused on lived experiences in particular places and settings. The authors are mindful of the limitations of offering superabundant examples of each point due to the length constraints that accompanied the invitation to submit this manuscript. We encourage interested readers to explore the references for additional nuances and examples of the main points.


Assuntos
Colonialismo , Psicologia Social , Humanos
19.
Int J Soc Psychiatry ; 70(1): 36-39, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37638706

RESUMO

Sadly, much of the world is no stranger to Psychological Trauma, particularly in poorer areas with poor health infrastructure. Western Aid Organisations frequently deploy to such areas bringing with them a western psychiatric tradition of nosology and therapy which may not be appropriate in other cultures. We argue that imposing a western system of diagnosis and treatment may not only undermine local culture but may also be bad for the patient. We discuss this with reference to the WHO's Mental Health Gap initiative (MHGap).


Assuntos
Venenos , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos , Masculino , Humanos , Colonialismo , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/diagnóstico
20.
Am J Community Psychol ; 73(1-2): 267-279, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37822070

RESUMO

Colonial trauma poses a significant risk to the physical, intellectual, and mental health of Indigenous youth and young adults. Education and mental health scholars are increasingly concerned about the emotional wellbeing of young people, particularly as rates of suicide have increased across the United States. With interest in identifying the unique contextual dynamics involved in understanding Indigenous suicide, this work considers characteristics related to colonialism that may uncover strategies for both educators and mental health practitioners that address disparities. Drawing on a larger ethnographic study, this inquiry asks how settler encroachment upon Indigenous land and food systems is related to death by suicide from the perspective of Cowichan Tribes members. Comprehensive semi-structured interviews were conducted (n = 21); each interview was audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed deductively based upon a priori suppositions related to settler colonial theory. Cowichan members' narrated explanations for suicide rooted in disruptions to (1) relationships with the land and (2) traditional food systems. They described how settler encroachment infringed upon their subsistence way of living and introduced incongruent constructions of nature-culture relations (e.g., humans as distinct and separate from the natural world). Settler futurity is secured through the arrogation of territorial dominance coupled with physical or conceptual acts of erasure, placing Indigenous lives and lifeways at risk. One outcome of the disruption to Indigenous collective capacities is a dramatic increase in Indigenous suicide.


Assuntos
Suicídio , Adolescente , Adulto Jovem , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Colonialismo
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