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1.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 273: 228-233, 2020 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33087617

RESUMO

Mobile health applications for diabetes are developed like never before and many patients use them for their personalized health needs. With increased use, an increased number of usability evaluations are performed to assure that the applications function as intended. In this review the goal was to determine what usability methods are currently used in the evaluation of mobile health applications for diabetes and how these are used. METHODS: A literature review was conducted to identify applicable studies in the databases ACM Digital Library, Cinahl and Pubmed between the years 2015 and 2020. After the inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 32 articles remained that were included in the final review. RESULTS: Most of the studies included one established usability engineering method such as an expert-based and/or user-based method or a validated questionnaire/instrument. Some also included a combination of these. Others used methods of their own design; commonly questionnaires and interviews either on their own or in combination. CONCLUSION: To achieve an adequate level of evidence and quality in the evaluation, it is important that at least one is an established usability engineering method or a validated instrument. This to assure and continue to build the evidence base in this area.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Aplicativos Móveis , Telemedicina , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Humanos , PubMed , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(6): 1107-1110, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33050727

RESUMO

With the recent pivot to telehealth as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an imperative to ensure that access to affordable devices and technologies with remote monitoring capabilities for people with diabetes becomes equitable. In addition, expanding the use of remote Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES) and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) services will require new strategies for achieving long-term, effective, continuous, data-driven care. The current COVID-19 pandemic has especially impacted underserved US communities that were already disproportionately impacted by diabetes. Historically, these same communities have faced barriers in accessing timely and effective diabetes care including access to DSMES and MNT services, and diabetes technologies. Our call to action encourages all involved to urge US Federal representatives to widen access to the array of technologies necessary for successful telehealth-delivered care beyond COVID-19.


Assuntos
Computação em Nuvem/tendências , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/tendências , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Telemedicina/tendências , Assistência de Saúde Universal , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Democracia , Complicações do Diabetes/epidemiologia , Complicações do Diabetes/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Humanos , Invenções/tendências , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Pandemias , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/organização & administração , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/tendências , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Autogestão/métodos , Autogestão/tendências , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/organização & administração
4.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(6): 1065-1073, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33063556

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Amidst the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has emerged as an alternative for inpatient point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) monitoring. We performed a feasibility pilot study using CGM in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Single-center, retrospective study of glucose monitoring in critically ill patients with COVID-19 on insulin therapy using Medtronic Guardian Connect and Dexcom G6 CGM systems. Primary outcomes were feasibility and accuracy for trending POC-BG. Secondary outcomes included reliability and nurse acceptance. Sensor glucose (SG) was used for trends between POC-BG with nursing guidance to reduce POC-BG frequency from one to two hours to four hours when the SG was in the target range. Mean absolute relative difference (MARD), Clarke error grids analysis (EGA), and Bland-Altman (B&A) plots were calculated for accuracy of paired SG and POC-BG measurements. RESULTS: CGM devices were placed on 11 patients: Medtronic (n = 6) and Dexcom G6 (n = 5). Both systems were feasible and reliable with good nurse acceptance. To determine accuracy, 437 paired SG and POC-BG readings were analyzed. For Medtronic, the MARD was 13.1% with 100% of readings in zones A and B on Clarke EGA. For Dexcom, MARD was 11.1% with 98% of readings in zones A and B. B&A plots had a mean bias of -17.76 mg/dL (Medtronic) and -1.94 mg/dL (Dexcom), with wide 95% limits of agreement. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CGM is feasible in critically ill patients and has acceptable accuracy to identify trends and guide intermittent blood glucose monitoring with insulin therapy.


Assuntos
Glicemia/análise , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Estado Terminal/terapia , Monitorização Fisiológica/instrumentação , Pneumonia Viral/sangue , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Estado Terminal/epidemiologia , Estado Terminal/mortalidade , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus/mortalidade , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/sangue , Hiperglicemia/diagnóstico , Hiperglicemia/mortalidade , Hiperglicemia/terapia , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Pandemias , Projetos Piloto , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Prognóstico , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos
6.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238763, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941454

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have found hypomagnesemia is linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, the level of serum magnesium (s-Mg) necessary for promoting overall health in these patients and the effects of s-Mg in diabetes HD patients remains to be clarified. METHODS: HD outpatients (n = 148 under, age ≤ 70 y) were followed over a 6-y period. They were divided into four groups according to their average s-Mg during the first year (L; low level, H; high level) and if they had DM or not (non-DM). The endpoint was mortality and hospitalization for decline of Activities of Daily Living (death/hospitalization). A receiver operating characteristics curve was used in diagnostic tests to identify s-Mg associated with this endpoint. Kaplan-Meier, log-rank test, and a Cox proportional hazards model were used to evaluate prognoses. Fisher's exact test and multiple regressions examined the causes of the endpoints between the four groups and the factors predictive of s-Mg. RESULTS: s-Mg at 2.7 mg/dL was associated with death/hospitalization. The 5-y survival rate was 38.1%, 86.7%, 73.2% and 87.5%, in the DM/Mg(L), DM/Mg(H), non-DM/Mg(L) and non-DM/Mg(H) groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The Cox proportional hazards model showed significantly lower risk in other groups compared with that in the DM/Mg(L) group [DM/Mg(H); hazard ratio (HR): 0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.05-0.97, P = 0.046, non-DM/Mg(L); HR: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.15-0.68, P = 0.003, non-DM/Mg(H); HR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.06-0.44, P < 0.001]. The frequency of the different causes of the endpoints for each group was not significant; s-Mg only associated with age in the DM group. CONCLUSIONS: s-Mg greater than 2.7 mg/dL associated with a favorable prognosis in HD patients with DM, suggesting that s-Mg is a factor independent of diabetes.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Magnésio/sangue , Diálise Renal , Atividades Cotidianas , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Curva ROC , Estudos Retrospectivos , Análise de Sobrevida
7.
Lancet ; 396(10252): 726-734, 2020 09 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32891214

RESUMO

Acute pancreatitis is an unpredictable and potentially lethal disease. The prognosis mainly depends on the development of organ failure and secondary infection of pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis. In the past 10 years, treatment of acute pancreatitis has moved towards a multidisciplinary, tailored, and minimally invasive approach. Despite improvements in treatment and critical care, severe acute pancreatitis is still associated with high mortality rates. In this Seminar, we outline the latest evidence on diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for acute pancreatitis.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Colangiopancreatografia Retrógrada Endoscópica , Drenagem , Hidratação , Apoio Nutricional , Pancreatite/diagnóstico , Pancreatite/terapia , Amilases/sangue , Colecistectomia , Diabetes Mellitus/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Insuficiência Pancreática Exócrina/etiologia , Insuficiência Pancreática Exócrina/terapia , Cálculos Biliares/complicações , Cálculos Biliares/cirurgia , Humanos , Lipase/sangue , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Pancreatite/sangue , Pancreatite/etiologia , Pancreatite Necrosante Aguda/diagnóstico , Pancreatite Necrosante Aguda/etiologia , Pancreatite Necrosante Aguda/terapia , Pancreatite Alcoólica/diagnóstico , Pancreatite Alcoólica/terapia , Prevenção Secundária , Stents , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Ultrassonografia
8.
In Vivo ; 34(5): 3029-3032, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871848

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Reports indicate that coronaviridae may inhibit insulin secretion. In this report we aimed to describe the course of glycemia in critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 36 SARS-CoV-2 patients (with no history of diabetes) in one intensive care unit (ICU). All the patients were admitted for hypoxemic respiratory failure; all but four required mechanical ventilation. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64.7 (9.7) years; 27 were men; the mean (±SD) duration of ICU stay was 12.9 (8.3 days). RESULTS: Twenty of 36 patients presented with hyperglycemia; brief intravenous infusions of short-acting insulin were administered in six patients. As of May 29 2020, 11 patients had died (seven with hyperglycemia). In 17 patients the Hyperglycemia Index [HGI; defined as the area under the curve of (hyper)glycemia level*time (h) divided by the total time in the ICU] was <16.21 mg/dl (0.90 mmol/l), whereas in three patients the HGI was ≥16.21 mg/dl (0.90 mol/l) and <32.25 mg/dl (1.79 mmol/l). CONCLUSION: In our series of ICU patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and no history of diabetes, a substantial number of patients had hyperglycemia, to a higher degree than would be expected by the stress of critical illness, lending credence to reports that speculated a tentative association between SARS-CoV-2 and hyperglycemia. This finding is important, since hyperglycemia can lead to further infectious complications.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Hiperglicemia/terapia , Insulina/metabolismo , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Glicemia/metabolismo , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Diabetes Mellitus/genética , Diabetes Mellitus/virologia , Feminino , Hospitalização , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/complicações , Hiperglicemia/virologia , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Respiração Artificial , Insuficiência Respiratória/fisiopatologia , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/complicações , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/terapia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/virologia
9.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(6): 1035-1064, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32985262

RESUMO

This article is the work product of the Continuous Glucose Monitor and Automated Insulin Dosing Systems in the Hospital Consensus Guideline Panel, which was organized by Diabetes Technology Society and met virtually on April 23, 2020. The guideline panel consisted of 24 international experts in the use of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and automated insulin dosing (AID) systems representing adult endocrinology, pediatric endocrinology, obstetrics and gynecology, advanced practice nursing, diabetes care and education, clinical chemistry, bioengineering, and product liability law. The panelists reviewed the medical literature pertaining to five topics: (1) continuation of home CGMs after hospitalization, (2) initiation of CGMs in the hospital, (3) continuation of AID systems in the hospital, (4) logistics and hands-on care of hospitalized patients using CGMs and AID systems, and (5) data management of CGMs and AID systems in the hospital. The panelists then developed three types of recommendations for each topic, including clinical practice (to use the technology optimally), research (to improve the safety and effectiveness of the technology), and hospital policies (to build an environment for facilitating use of these devices) for each of the five topics. The panelists voted on 78 proposed recommendations. Based on the panel vote, 77 recommendations were classified as either strong or mild. One recommendation failed to reach consensus. Additional research is needed on CGMs and AID systems in the hospital setting regarding device accuracy, practices for deployment, data management, and achievable outcomes. This guideline is intended to support these technologies for the management of hospitalized patients with diabetes.


Assuntos
Glicemia/análise , Equipamentos e Provisões , Hospitalização , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Monitorização Fisiológica/instrumentação , Adulto , Glicemia/efeitos dos fármacos , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Automonitorização da Glicemia/normas , Criança , Consenso , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Complicações do Diabetes/sangue , Complicações do Diabetes/epidemiologia , Complicações do Diabetes/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Cálculos da Dosagem de Medicamento , Equipamentos e Provisões/normas , Feminino , Hospitais/normas , Humanos , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina/normas , Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Monitorização Fisiológica/normas , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/sangue , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Gravidez
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22311, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957394

RESUMO

Diabetes mellitus results in an attenuated inflammatory response, reduces pulmonary microvascular permeability, and may decrease the risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Studies have shown that patients with ARDS are better managed by a conservative as compared to liberal fluid management strategy. However, it is not known if the same fluid management principles hold true for patients with comorbid diabetes mellitus and ARDS.As diabetes mellitus results in reduced pulmonary microvascular permeability and an attenuated inflammatory response, we hypothesize that in the setting of ARDS, diabetic patients will be able to tolerate a positive fluid balance better than patients without diabetes.The Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) randomized patients with ARDS to conservative versus liberal fluid management strategies. In a secondary analysis of this trial, we calculated the interaction of diabetic status and differing fluid strategies on outcomes. Propensity score subclassification matching was used to control for the differing baseline characteristics between patients with and without diabetes.Nine hundred fifty-six patients were analyzed. In a propensity score matched analysis, the difference in the effect of a conservative as compared to liberal fluid management strategy on ventilator free days was 2.23 days (95% CI: -0.97 to 5.43 days) in diabetic patients, and 2.37 days (95% CI: -0.21 to 4.95 days) in non-diabetic patients. The difference in the effect of a conservative as compared to liberal fluid management on 60 day mortality was 2% (95% CI: -11.8% to 15.8%) in diabetic patients, and -7.9% (95% CI: -21.7% to 5.9%) in non-diabetic patients.When comparing a conservative fluid management strategy to a liberal fluid management strategy, diabetic patients with ARDS did not have a statistically significant difference in outcomes than non-diabetic patients.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Hidratação/métodos , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório do Adulto/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Cateteres , Tratamento Conservador , Diabetes Mellitus/congênito , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pontuação de Propensão , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório do Adulto/complicações
12.
Arch Iran Med ; 23(8): 564-567, 2020 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894970

RESUMO

The coronavirus infection is an evolving pandemic with high morbidity and mortality, especially in people with comorbidities. The case fatality rate (CFR) is 9.2% in the presence of diabetes, while it is 1.4% in those without any comorbidity. Diabetes is a prevalent disease globally; hence, healthcare professionals are highly concerned about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic progression. Current evidence does not support higher incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in people with diabetes (PWD). However, people with diabetes are considered high risk for developing complications. Optimal metabolic control is a challenging concept, especially in the presence of an acute and severe respiratory viral infection. In this consensus, we considered the challenging issues in management of patients with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The consensus covers various aspects of outpatient as well as inpatient care based on the current evidence.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/virologia , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico) , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
13.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 8(10): 855-867, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32946822

RESUMO

Older adults with diabetes are heterogeneous in their medical, functional, and cognitive status, and require careful individualisation of their treatment regimens. However, in the absence of detailed information from clinical trials involving older people with varying characteristics, there is little evidence-based guidance, which is a notable limitation of current approaches to care. It is important to recognise that older people with diabetes might vary in their profiles according to age category, functional health, presence of frailty, and comorbidity profiles. In addition, all older adults with diabetes require an individualised approach to care, ranging from robust individuals to those residing in care homes with a short life expectancy, those requiring palliative care, or those requiring end-of-life management. In this Review, our multidisciplinary team of experts describes the current evidence in several important areas in geriatric diabetes, and outlines key research gaps and research questions in each of these areas with the aim to develop evidence-based recommendations to improve the outcomes of interest in older adults.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/normas , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto/normas , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Humanos
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(32): e21495, 2020 Aug 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32769885

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between doctor-shopping behavior and clinical conditions, and to clearly outline the effects of both the number of clinic visits and the number of doctor changes on patients' health conditions. Data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004 was collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. After randomly selecting one million people, we extracted 5-year longitudinal data, about the number of clinic visits, number of doctor changes, and changes in self-health status for each patient with diabetes over the age of 18. We developed a relationship among the variables by using the generalized estimating equation. The results revealed that the number of clinic visits on the change of health status is a U curve, suggesting that health condition could be optimal with an appropriate number of clinic visits. The effect of the number of doctor changes is linearly correlated with health deterioration. The results suggest that disease conditions can only be controlled with an adequate number of clinic visits. Excessively frequent clinic visits are not only unfavorable to patients' health status but are also wasteful of limited medical resources. For diabetic mellitus patients, the more they change doctors, the worse their health status. All of these results are important for patients to stay healthy and to save medical resources.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Assistência Ambulatorial/psicologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , Diabetes Mellitus/psicologia , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Programas Nacionais de Saúde , Estudos Retrospectivos , Taiwan
17.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(5): 928-944, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32783456

RESUMO

Patients with diabetes may experience adverse outcomes related to their glycemic control when hospitalized. Continuous glucose monitoring systems, insulin-dosing software, enhancements to the electronic health record, and other medical technologies are now available to improve hospital care. Because of these developments, new approaches are needed to incorporate evolving treatments into routine care. With the goal of educating healthcare professionals on the most recent practices and research for managing diabetes in the hospital, Diabetes Technology Society hosted the Virtual Hospital Diabetes Meeting on April 24-25, 2020. Because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the meeting was restructured to be held virtually during the national lockdown to ensure the safety of the participants and allow them to remain at their posts treating COVID-19 patients. The meeting focused on (1) inpatient management and perioperative care, (2) diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state, (3) computer-guided insulin dosing, (4) Coronavirus Disease 2019 and diabetes, (5) technology, (6) hypoglycemia, (7) data and cybersecurity, (8) special situations, (9) glucometrics and insulinometrics, and (10) quality and safety. This meeting report contains summaries of each of the ten sessions. A virtual poster session will be presented within two months of the meeting.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/terapia
20.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1232, 2020 Aug 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32787826

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a huge growing problem, and causes high and escalating costs to society. Self- care practice for adults with diabetes is not well addressed in sub-Saharan Africa including Ethiopia. To prevent serious morbidity and mortality, diabetes treatment requires a commitment to demanding self-care practice. This study aimed to assess self- care practices and its associated factors among adults with diabetes in Dire Dawa public hospitals of Eastern, Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 adults with diabetes. The study participants were selected through systematic random sampling. Data were collected from February 1st to March 1st, 2018. Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data were entered into Epi-data version 3.3.1 and exported to SPSS version 22.0 for analysis. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression with crude and adjusted odds ratios along with the 95% confidence interval was computed and interpreted accordingly. Good self-care was defined based on mean calculation; a result above the mean value had a good self-care practice, and a P-value of < 0.05 was considered to declare a result as statistically significant. RESULT: The result of the study showed that 55.9%, (95% CI: 51.4, 60.3) of participants had good self-care practices. Good self-care practice was associated with having family support, treatment satisfaction, diabetes education, having glucometer, higher educational status, duration of the disease, high economic status, and having good knowledge. Self-care practice was significantly associated with good diabetes knowledge (AOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.37, 3.35), family support system (AOR = 2.69, 95% CI:1.56, 4.62), treatment satisfaction (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI:1.18, 3.62), diabetes education (AOR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.35, 3.63), high economic status (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.01, 3.48), having glucometer,(AOR = 2.69, 95% CI:1.57, 4.63),higher educational status (AOR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.31, 5.49), and duration of disease greater than 10 years AOR = 2.70, 95% CI: 1.17, 6.26). CONCLUSION: In this study, a large number of adults had poor self-care practices which are very significant in controlling diabetes. Providing diabetes education, about self-care practices to the respondents and their families should be considerable.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Autocuidado/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Etiópia , Feminino , Hospitais Públicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
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