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2.
Am J Forensic Med Pathol ; 41(1): 11-17, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977347

RESUMO

Errors in death certification can directly affect the decedent's survivors and the public register. We assessed the effectiveness of an educational seminar targeting frequent and important errors identified by local death certificate (DC) evaluation. Retrospective review of 1500 DCs categorized errors and physician specialty. A 60-minute didactic/case-based seminar was subsequently designed for family medicine physician (FAM) participants, with administration of presurvey, immediate post, and 2-month postsurveys. Most DCs were completed by FAM (73%), followed by internists (18%) and surgeons (3%). Error occurrence (EO) rate ranged between 32 and 75% across all specialities. Family medicine physician experienced in palliative care had the lowest EO rate (32%), significantly lower (P < 0.001) than FAM without interest in palliative care (62%), internal medicine (62%), and surgery (75%). Common errors were use of abbreviations (26%), mechanism as underlying cause of death (23%), and no underlying cause of death recorded (22%). Presurvey participants (n = 72) had an overall EO rate of 72% (64% excluding formatting errors). Immediate postsurvey (n = 75) and 2-month postsurvey (n = 24) participants demonstrated significantly lower overall EO (34% and 24%, respectively), compared with the Pre-S (P < 0.05). A 60-minute seminar on death certification reduced EO rate with perceived long-term effects.


Assuntos
Atestado de Óbito , Documentação/normas , Capacitação em Serviço , Médicos de Família/educação , Alberta , Causas de Morte , Avaliação Educacional , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Estudos Retrospectivos
3.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e155-e159, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31973823

RESUMO

An increasing number of global initiatives aim to address the disconnection between the increasing number of women entering medicine and the persistence of gender imbalance in the physician anaesthesiologist workforce. This commentary complements the global movement's efforts to increase women's representation in academic anaesthesiology by presenting considerations for fostering inclusion for women in academic anaesthesiology from both the faculty and departmental leadership perspectives in a US academic anaesthesiology department.


Assuntos
Academias e Institutos , Anestesiologistas , Anestesiologia , Médicas , Docentes de Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança
4.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 189-189.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903608
5.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 189-189.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903612
6.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 190-190.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903614
7.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 176-179, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31246621

RESUMO

The demographic shift toward older populations of physicians is well documented across much of the globe. As a result, it is becoming imperative that academic organizations generate research to inform understanding of both individual and institutional needs relating to these faculty members. The 2 reports by Skarupski and colleagues in this issue of Academic Medicine build on the research that is available, expose some new areas for consideration, and raise new lines of inquiry for researchers interested in studying late-career faculty and faculty transitions. The author of this Invited Commentary aims to situate Skarupski and colleagues' findings relative to what the academic medicine community knows-and does not know-about late-career faculty members, the institutions that employ these faculty, and the complex relationships therewith. Specifically, the author explores the following: the demographics of those considering retirement; the connection between identity and retirement decisions; the alignment between institutional and faculty member needs; institution preparedness; mentoring; and theoretical constructs and areas for inquiry that may inform future investigations.


Assuntos
Tutoria , Faculdades de Medicina , Docentes de Medicina , Humanos , Mentores , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 241-247, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31348063

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Tenure status has important implications for medical school faculty recruitment and retention and may affect educational quality, academic freedom, and collegiality. However, tenure trends in academic family medicine are unknown. This study aimed to describe trends in tenure status of family medicine faculty overall and by gender and status of minorities underrepresented in medicine (URM) in Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools. METHOD: Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Roster data were used to describe trends in tenure status of full-time family medicine faculty, 1977 to 2017. Bivariate and trend analyses were conducted to assess associations and describe patterns between tenure status and gender, race, and ethnicity. Interdepartmental variations in tenure trends over the years were also examined. RESULTS: Among family medicine faculty, the proportions of faculty tenured or on a tenure track dropped more than threefold from 1977 (46.6%; n = 507/1,089) to 2017 (12.7%; n = 729/5,752). Lower proportions of women and URM faculty were tenured or on a tenure track than male and non-URM faculty, respectively. But the gaps among them were converging. Compared with other clinical departments, family medicine had the highest proportion of faculty (74.6%; n = 4,291/5,752) not on a tenure track in 2017. CONCLUSIONS: Proportion of tenure positions significantly decreased among family medicine faculty in U.S. medical schools. While gaps between male and female faculty and among certain racial/ethnic groups remained for family medicine tenure status, they have decreased over time, mainly because of a substantial increase in nontenured positions.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/tendências , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/educação , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
9.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 216-220, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31464733

RESUMO

PROBLEM: Gender inequity in academic medicine is a pervasive challenge. Recommendations have been implemented to reduce inequities for female faculty. However, there are no well-established guidelines for the recruitment and retention of female residents. APPROACH: To address challenges faced by female physicians and support the recruitment and retention of female residents, female emergency medicine residents and attending physicians at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania formed a professional development group (PDG), #Shemergency, in July 2017. From July 2017 to July 2018, this PDG developed events and initiatives for female residents that addressed methods to improve awareness of and develop skills relevant to well-described gender disparities in mentorship, speakership and conference representation, compensation, evaluations, wellness and service, and award recognition. OUTCOMES: Over its first year (July 2017-July 2018), the PDG created a professional community and enhanced mentorship through a number of events and initiatives. The PDG secured funding for 5 residents to attend a national conference and nominated 5 residents and 2 attending physicians for professional organization awards (4 nominees won). NEXT STEPS: After the first year, the PDG expanded the number of joint activities with both male and female colleagues and organized a citywide event for female residents and faculty representing 5 different residency programs. Future work will focus on sustainability (e.g., holding fundraising events), generalizability (e.g., expanding the gender-disparity areas addressed as well as spreading the model to other programs), developing additional events and initiatives (e.g., expanding the number of joint activities with male colleagues), and outcome assessments (e.g., distributing pre- and postevent surveys).


Assuntos
Medicina de Emergência/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Competência Clínica , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Médicas/organização & administração , Sexismo
10.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 190-193, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31464735

RESUMO

Through site visits to 42 teaching clinics associated with family and internal medicine residency programs during 2013-2018, the authors observed a spectrum of faculty involvement. In this Perspective, they describe and share examples of the 3 faculty models they identified. Some programs have a small, focused faculty whose members spend at least 5 half-day sessions per week seeing patients or precepting residents in the clinic. Others have a large, dispersed faculty with many faculty physicians who spend 1 or 2 half-day sessions per week in the clinic. Some use a hybrid model with a small focused faculty group plus other faculty with little clinic time. The dispersed model was observed only in university-based residencies, and the focused faculty model was commonly seen in community-based residencies. While faculty in both settings must juggle multiple responsibilities, several studies have confirmed the value of having faculty committed to ambulatory care and teaching. In site visit interviews, clinic leaders indicated focused faculty play an important role in teaching clinics by championing clinic improvement, improving continuity of care, and enhancing the resident experience. Faculty physicians who spend substantial time in the clinic know the residents' patients, provide greater continuity of care, anchor clinic teams, and coordinate coverage for residents when they are on other rotations. Clinic and residency program leaders generally favored a shift toward a focused or hybrid model. The authors view the hybrid model as a practical way to balance the challenges of having a focused faculty with the multiple responsibilities facing university- and community-based faculty.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Medicina Interna/educação , Educação Médica Continuada , Grupos Focais , Hospitais de Ensino , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Atenção Primária à Saúde
11.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 234-240, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31219814

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Individuals 55 or older constitute 28.5% of the U.S. population but 32% of full-time faculty at U.S. medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). The academic medicine community knows little about the policies, programs, and resources for faculty in pre- and post-retirement stages. The authors sought to inventory the range of institutional resources for late-career faculty development and retirement planning in U.S. LCME-accredited medical schools. METHOD: The authors surveyed 138 medical school faculty affairs deans and leaders in May 2017 to ascertain (1) priorities around retirement, succession planning, and workforce development/support; (2) retirement policies; (3) late-career and retirement resources; and (4) perceived factors impacting faculty retirement. RESULTS: Of those invited, 84 (60.9%) responded to the survey, and of these, 44 (52.4%) disagreed or strongly disagreed that retirement planning and support was a top priority in their offices. Less than half (n = 35 [41.7%]) reported that their institution had a retirement policy. The 5 most common late-career and retirement-related resources offered were emeriti or honorific appointments, academic benefits for retirees, phased retirement, retirement counseling, and financial planning. More than half the respondents noted that the following factors impact faculty retirements: physician burnout (43/75 respondents [57.3%]), decreased grant funding (42/75 [56.0%]), and changes in productivity requirements (38/75 [50.7%]). CONCLUSIONS: These data highlight a distinct, startling gap between the needs of a fast-growing population of late-career faculty and the priorities of their institutions. Faculty affairs/faculty development offices must meet these growing needs.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Liderança , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Aposentadoria/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
12.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 226-233, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31219815

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The average age of full-time faculty members at U.S. medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education was 49.5 in 2017, yet the academic medicine community knows little about late-career faculty. The authors sought to characterize full-time faculty members 55 or older and assess their work-life expectations. METHOD: The authors conducted a survey (May-September 2017) of faculty 55+ at 14 U.S. medical schools. RESULTS: Of the 5,204 faculty members invited, 2,126 (40.8%) responded. The average age of respondents was 62.3, and among those responding to the relevant questions, most identified as male (1,425; 67.2%), white (1,841; 88.3%), and married/partnered (1,803; 85.5%). Fewer than half (915; 45.2%) indicated they had begun thinking about full-time retirement, estimating that they would do so at a mean age of 67.8 (standard deviation = 4.3). Half the respondents (1,004; 50.0%) would consider moving to part-time status. The top 3 personal factors likely to affect retirement decisions were health, postretirement plans, and spouse's/partner's plans. The top 3 professional factors were phased retirement or part-time options, changes in institutional leadership, and presence of a successor. Faculty indicated that they would, post retirement, be interested in ongoing work in teaching/education and research/scholarship and that they wanted health insurance, email, and part-time teaching opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: U.S. medical schools employ a rapidly aging workforce. These data indicate that neither faculty members nor institutions are prepared. Faculty affairs and develop ment leaders should champion efforts to engage with late-career faculty to prepare for this changing landscape.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Aposentadoria/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
13.
Belo Horizonte; s.n; 20191206. 60 p. ilus, tab.
Tese em Português | Coleciona SUS | ID: biblio-1051409

RESUMO

Introdução: A aprendizagem baseada em problemas (PBL-problem based learning) é um método de ensino que pode apresentar erosões e falhas, ao longo de sua execução. A formação continuada de tutores e a conscientização dos alunos acerca dos princípios do PBL são essenciais para o adequado funcionamento dos grupos tutoriais (GT). Objetivos: avaliar o impacto da iniciativa educacional "Escolhas Sábias em Educação" no funcionamento do GT antes e após a intervenção numa escola médica, com currículo PBL. Métodos: estudo quase-experimental desenvolvido na UNIFENAS-BH, com os alunos e tutores do 1° ao 8° período de Medicina. A instituição desenvolveu capacitação docente "Escolhas Sábias em Educação" com a identificação de cinco itens que não deveriam ser praticados pelos docentes no GT, com ampla divulgação deles para tutores e alunos. Foram eles: não deixe de ativar o conhecimento prévio, não permita a leitura mecânica do conteúdo estudado, não deixe de fazer feedback, não tenha medo de assumir o que não sabe, não permita que o mapa da resolução seja um resumo de "todo" o assunto. A partir deles, foi elaborado o questionário com perguntas que representassem os itens (domínios), para avaliar a qualidade do GT. O questionário foi aplicado entre tutores e alunos, antes e depois da intervenção. Análise comparativa da média de percepção do funcionamento do GT pré- com pós-intervenção foi feita por meio do teste ANOVA. Resultados: participaram do estudo 564 alunos e 57 tutores na 1ª fase e 603 alunos e 71 tutores na 2ª fase. Observa-se, na 1ª fase, uma média global maior no grupo de tutores (média: 4,15±0,33) em relação ao grupo dos alunos (média: 3,84±0,50), com diferença estatisticamente significativa (p< 0,001). Essa média global dos tutores continua maior na 2ª fase (tutor: 4,24±0,39; aluno 4,03±0,48; p< 0,001). Quando analisado cada um dos domínios, essa diferença manteve-se estatisticamente significativa na 1ª fase. Quanto à 2ª fase, somente para "não permita que o mapa de resolução seja um resumo de 'todo' o assunto" não houve influência estatisticamente significativa (p =0,37). Na comparação entre as duas fases, um aumento na média geral foi observado após a intervenção em ambos os grupos, mas, estatisticamente significativa, apenas no grupo dos alunos (diferença média: 0,19+0,06), p<0,001). Conclusão: houve mudança significativa na percepção do funcionamento do GT após a intervenção educacional entre os alunos. Essa mudança entre os discentes mostra que a intervenção foi exitosa, pois no currículo PBL, a aprendizagem é centrada no aluno


Introduction: Problem based learning (PBL) is a teaching method that may present erosions and flaws throughout its execution. The ongoing training of tutors and the awareness of students with regard to the PBL principles are essential for the proper performance of the tutorial groups (GT). Aims: Assess the impact of the initiative "Wise Choices in Education" on the functioning of the GT before and after the intervention in a medical school with PBL curriculum. Methods: Quasi-experimental study developed at UNIFENAS-BH, with medical students and tutors from the 1st- 8th term (Faculty of Medicine).The institution has developed faculty development "Wise choices in education", pinpointing five items that should not be performed by the tutors of the GT, making both tutors and students aware of them. The aforementioned items were: Do not forget to activate previous knowledge; do not allow mechanical reading of the matter that has been studied to take place; do not forget to give a feedback, do not be afraid to acknowledge what you have no knowledge of; do not allow the resolution map to be the summary of "all" the matter. From those items, a questionnaire was devised with questions that represented the items (domains) in order to assess the quality of the GT. The questionnaire was applied to tutors and students, before and after the intervention. Comparative analysis of the average perception of the functioning of the GT pre with post-intervention was carried out by ANOVA test. Results: 564 students and 57 tutors participated in the study on its 1st phase and 603 students and 71 tutors on its 2ndphase. It was noted that in the 1st phase, the global average in the group of tutors (4,15±0,33) is bigger than the group of students (3,84±0,50), with a statistically significant difference (p< 0,001). This global average of the tutors remains bigger on the 2ndphase (tutor:4,24±0,39; student:4,03±0,48; p< 0,001). When each one of the domains is analyzed, the difference remained statistically significant in the 1st phase. Regarding the 2ndphase, only "do not allow the resolution map to be a summary of 'all' the matter" did not have a statistically significantinfluence (p=0,37). Comparing both phases, some growth on the general rate was observed after the intervention in both groups, but only statistically significant in the student's group (average difference: 0,19+0,06, p<0,001). Conclusion: there was a significant change in the perception on the functioning of the GT after the intervention amongst the students. This change between the students shows that the intervention was successful, since in a PBL curriculum, learning is focused on the student


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Adulto Jovem , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Educação Médica , Estudantes de Medicina , Capacitação , Docentes de Medicina
14.
Pediatr Dent ; 41(6): 451-454, 2019 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31882031

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether disparities in promotion and academic productivity exist within academic pediatric dentistry. Methods: The top 15 schools funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research were included in this study. Gender differences in productivity and advancement were evaluated. Results: Women comprised 48.9 percent of all faculty surveyed (n=184). Less than a third of full professors were women. Female faculty graduated more recently (18.2 years; [95 percent confidence interval (95% CI) equals 15.4 to 20.9], versus 28.5 years for men [95% CI equals 24.8 to 32.1]; P<0.001) and had fewer senior author publications (1.6 [95% CI equals 1.9 to 5.1] versus 3.5 [95% CI equals 0.7 to 2.4]; P=0.03) than their male colleagues. In a linear regression correcting for number of publications and years since graduation, gender was not a significant predictor of academic advancement. Conclusions: Most women in academic pediatric dentistry remain in lower academic tiers with fewer senior author publications. This discrepancy is explained by the years since graduation between male and female faculty at lower levels of academic advancement. Increasing scholarship opportunities and compensation for female faculty members may help improve gender equity in dental academia.


Assuntos
Docentes de Odontologia , Docentes de Medicina , Criança , Eficiência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
16.
BMJ ; 367: l6573, 2019 12 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31843745

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Women remain underrepresented on faculties of medicine and the life sciences more broadly. Whether gender differences in self presentation of clinical research exist and may contribute to this gender gap has been challenging to explore empirically. The objective of this study was to analyze whether men and women differ in how positively they frame their research findings and to analyze whether the positive framing of research is associated with higher downstream citations. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study. DATA SOURCES: Titles and abstracts from 101 720 clinical research articles and approximately 6.2 million general life science articles indexed in PubMed and published between 2002 and 2017. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Analysis of article titles and abstracts to determine whether men and women differ in how positively they present their research through use of terms such as "novel" or "excellent." For a set of 25 positive terms, we estimated the relative probability of positive framing as a function of the gender composition of the first and last authors, adjusting for scientific journal, year of publication, journal impact, and scientific field. RESULTS: Articles in which both the first and last author were women used at least one of the 25 positive terms in 10.9% of titles or abstracts versus 12.2% for articles involving a male first or last author, corresponding to a 12.3% relative difference (95% CI 5.7% to 18.9%). Gender differences in positive presentation were greatest in high impact clinical journals (impact factor >10), in which women were 21.4% less likely to present research positively. Across all clinical journals, positive presentation was associated with 9.4% (6.6% to 12.2%) higher subsequent citations, and in high impact clinical journals 13.0% (9.5% to 16.5%) higher citations. Results were similar when broadened to general life science articles published in journals indexed by PubMed, suggesting that gender differences in positive word use generalize to broader samples. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical articles involving a male first or last author were more likely to present research findings positively in titles and abstracts compared with articles in which both the first and last author were women, particularly in the highest impact journals. Positive presentation of research findings was associated with higher downstream citations.


Assuntos
Autoria , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Editoração/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Sexuais
17.
Medicina (B Aires) ; 79(5): 384-390, 2019.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31671388

RESUMO

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, there are thirteen core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) that medical graduates should be able to perform in their first day of residency, without direct supervision. In Argentina EPAs are not clearly defined. Moreover, there is no local data about the need of supervision regarding these activities. The aim of this study was to assess residents' and teaching physicians' estimations about the level of supervision that physicians in their first month of residency needed in order to perform EPAs. A cross-section study was conducted. First-year medical residents and teaching physicians were included. Electronic or paper surveys were sent, asking the level of supervision the participants estimated that residents needed to perform the 13 core EPAs, during their first month of residency. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. There were significant differences between the opinion of residents (n = 71) and teaching physicians (n = 39), for 11 out of 13 EPAs. More than half of the teaching physicians considered that residents needed direct supervision when performing EPAs, except for asking clinical questions and looking for evidence. Most residents thought that they required direct supervision in 6 EPAs. In conclusion, medical residents perceived the need of lower levels of supervision when compared to teaching physicians, who considered that medical graduates were not capable of performing most EPAs without direct supervision upon entering residency. Thus, it would be important to improve the procedures to evaluate the competences of medical graduates in order to establish more accurate supervision levels.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar/organização & administração , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Argentina , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Avaliação Educacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Valores de Referência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
20.
West J Emerg Med ; 20(6): 939-947, 2019 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31738722

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Academic medicine continues to struggle in its efforts to compensate scholarly productivity. Academic achievements receive less recognition compared to clinical work, evidenced by a lack of reduced clinical hours or financial incentive. Core departmental education responsibilities are often distributed inequitably across academic departments. An approach using an incentive program, which emphasizes transparency, equity, and consensus may help academic departments share core education responsibilities and reward scholarly activity. METHODS: We launched a two-stage approach to confront the inequitable distribution of educational responsibilities and to recognize the scholarly work among our faculty. In the first stage, baseline education expectations were implemented for all faculty members, which included accountability procedures tied to a financial incentive. The second stage involved the creation of an aAcademic rRelative vValue uUnit (ARVU) system which contained additional activities that were derived and weighted based on stakeholder consensus. The points earned in the ARVU system were applied towards additional financial incentive at academic year-end. We compared education contributions before and after implementation as well as total points earned in the ARVU system. RESULTS: In the first year of implementing education expectations, 87% of faculty fulfilled requirements. Those with a heavier clinical load made up the majority of deficient faculty. Those who did not meet education expectations were notified and had their year-end incentive reduced to reflect this. Faculty conference attendance increased by 21% (P<.001) and the number of resident assessments completed increased by 30% (P<.001) compared to the previous year. To date, faculty across the department have logged a total of 1,240 academic activities in the database, which will be converted into financial bonus amounts at year-end. CONCLUSION: We have seen significant increases in faculty participation in educational activities and learner assessments as well as documentation of activities in the ARVU system. A similar system using different specialty-specific activities may be generalizable and employed at other institutions.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , Consenso , Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Responsabilidade Social , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , Eficiência , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Motivação , New York , Melhoria de Qualidade
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