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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 507, 2024 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38714993

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The current applications of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine continue to attract the attention of medical students. This study aimed to identify undergraduate medical students' attitudes toward AI in medicine, explore present AI-related training opportunities, investigate the need for AI inclusion in medical curricula, and determine preferred methods for teaching AI curricula. METHODS: This study uses a mixed-method cross-sectional design, including a quantitative study and a qualitative study, targeting Palestinian undergraduate medical students in the academic year 2022-2023. In the quantitative part, we recruited a convenience sample of undergraduate medical students from universities in Palestine from June 15, 2022, to May 30, 2023. We collected data by using an online, well-structured, and self-administered questionnaire with 49 items. In the qualitative part, 15 undergraduate medical students were interviewed by trained researchers. Descriptive statistics and an inductive content analysis approach were used to analyze quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. RESULTS: From a total of 371 invitations sent, 362 responses were received (response rate = 97.5%), and 349 were included in the analysis. The mean age of participants was 20.38 ± 1.97, with 40.11% (140) in their second year of medical school. Most participants (268, 76.79%) did not receive formal education on AI before or during medical study. About two-thirds of students strongly agreed or agreed that AI would become common in the future (67.9%, 237) and would revolutionize medical fields (68.7%, 240). Participants stated that they had not previously acquired training in the use of AI in medicine during formal medical education (260, 74.5%), confirming a dire need to include AI training in medical curricula (247, 70.8%). Most participants (264, 75.7%) think that learning opportunities for AI in medicine have not been adequate; therefore, it is very important to study more about employing AI in medicine (228, 65.3%). Male students (3.15 ± 0.87) had higher perception scores than female students (2.81 ± 0.86) (p < 0.001). The main themes that resulted from the qualitative analysis of the interview questions were an absence of AI learning opportunities, the necessity of including AI in medical curricula, optimism towards the future of AI in medicine, and expected challenges related to AI in medical fields. CONCLUSION: Medical students lack access to educational opportunities for AI in medicine; therefore, AI should be included in formal medical curricula in Palestine.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Currículo , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Oriente Médio , Árabes , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Adulto , Pesquisa Qualitativa
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 506, 2024 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38715022

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medical students face significant psychological stress, impacting their academic performance and well-being. The Systematic Assessment for Resilience (SAR) framework is designed to enhance resilience and mitigate stress among medical students, addressing the need for interventions within the assessment system in medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of SAR framework on medical students' resilience, anxiety, depression, burnout, and academic stress. METHODS: This study employed a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-testing. It involved the training of course coordinators in implementing the SAR framework and its integration into the daily learning activities. Fourth-year medical students were assessed before and after the intervention using standardized measures of resilience, anxiety, depression, burnout, and academic stress. Data were analyzed using quantitative methods and thematic analysis for qualitative feedback. RESULTS: Post-intervention, students demonstrated a significant increase in resilience scores (p < 0.001) and a notable decrease in measures of anxiety, depression, and academic stress (p < 0.001). The burnout types were also statistically different (p < 0.001) except client-related burnout (p > 0.05). Qualitative feedback of the course coordinators highlighted an improved learning environment, increased coping strategies, and a more supportive academic culture. CONCLUSION: The SAR framework significantly contributes to enhancing medical students' resilience and reducing psychological distress. Its implementation suggests a promising approach to fostering a supportive educational environment that not only addresses the psychological challenges faced by medical students but also enhances their academic performance and overall well-being. Further research is warranted to explore the long-term impacts of SAR across different medical education contexts.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , Depressão , Resiliência Psicológica , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Feminino , Masculino , Estresse Psicológico , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto Jovem , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Esgotamento Profissional/prevenção & controle , Esgotamento Profissional/psicologia , Adulto
3.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 53(1): 47-54, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724170

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The prolongation and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have led to an uncertain and devastating panorama in many populations, and the evidence shows a high prevalence of mental health problems in medical students. The objective was to evaluate the association between mood disorders and sleep quality (SQ) in Peruvian medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 310 medical students from a private university in Peru. The SQ was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), while mood disorders were evaluated using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). All information was collected by online surveys and then analysed in the R programming language. RESULTS: The SQ results measured by PSQI were poor in 83.9% of the medical students. In the Poison regression analysis, the results of the bivariate analysis in men show that all mood disorders found the prevalence of poor SQ. However, in the multivariate analysis only stress (PRa=1.30; 95% CI, 1.08-1.57; P<0.01) and anxiety (PRa=1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.56; P <0.01) increased the prevalence of poor SQ. Women had a similar pattern in bivariate analysis, whereas in multivariate analysis, only severe stress (PRa=1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.29; P <0.05) increased the prevalence of poor SQ. CONCLUSIONS: This study allows us to observe the consequences that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on medical students in Peru. It also revealed a population group vulnerable to poor quality of sleep and bad mood, which in the future will impact on health. It is suggested to educate medical students about the importance of proper sleep hygiene and the consequences of poor sleep hygiene practices.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , COVID-19 , Transtornos do Humor , Qualidade do Sono , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Peru/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Masculino , Adulto Jovem , Prevalência , Transtornos do Humor/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Adulto , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Fatores Sexuais , Adolescente
4.
Tunis Med ; 102(4): 189-193, 2024 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38746956

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Ethical reasoning is an important skill for all physicians who often face complex ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. Therefore, medical training should include methods for learning ethical theories and concepts, as well as how to apply them in practical situations. AIM: Assess the contribution of an Ethical Reasoning Learning session to fifth medical students' training through a comparison of results of the same objective and structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the form of simulated interview before and after sessions. METHODS: Four 45- minutes' sessions of Ethical Reasoning Learning (ERL) were implemented during a psychiatry internship for four groups of 5th-year students of the faculty of medicine of Monastir (Tunisia). Each session was divided into 7 parts: introduction, reading of a clinical vignette, brainstorming concerning the problems posed by this clinical situation, classification of the problems, identification of the principles of medical ethics, construction of the ethical matrix, and a conclusion. RESULTS: Fifty-seven students participated in the study divided into 4 groups. We found a significant difference in the means of the OSCE scores before and after the ERL session and a significant difference between the probability of respecting medical secrecy during pre and post-ethical reasoning learning sessions (p <0.001). We have found an effect of ERL sessions on the acquisition of this ethical competence by medical students. CONCLUSION: We learned that an ERL session has improved medical training in ethics applied to psychiatry. Other sessions dealing with other ethical skills are necessary to confirm these results.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Ética Médica , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Ética Médica/educação , Tunísia , Educação Médica/métodos , Educação Médica/ética , Aprendizagem , Internato e Residência/ética , Psiquiatria/educação , Psiquiatria/ética , Feminino , Masculino , Avaliação Educacional , Raciocínio Clínico
5.
Tunis Med ; 102(4): 194-199, 2024 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38746957

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In intensive care medicine (ICM), the use of Patient-Management Problem (PMP) remains limited and no feedback from students is available. AIM: To compare the feasibility of employing PMP referring to clinical cases (CC) as assessment tools for appraising the knowledge and competencies in ICM students; and to gather the students' perception regarding this experience. METHODS: it was a cross-sectional randomized trial. Were included, external students in the 3rd year of the 2nd cycle of medical studies (3rd-SCMS) during their ICM externship. All the participants underwent two random draws (the 1st one for assessment tool to be started (PMP or CC) and the 2nd for the passage order for PMP. Two PMPs versus two grouped QCMs-CC were prepared and a satisfaction questionnaire was distributed. The main judgment criterion was the effect of each assessment tool on the students' decision-making process. This focused on the relevance of the elements provided by each technique, the implication and the difficulty felt. The secondary endpoint was the scores taken for each tool tested. RESULTS: 20 students were included. All participants had previous experience with PMPs and only nine were familiar with grouped MCQs-CC. PMP scores were 14.9 for the 1st theme and 15.8 for the 2nd theme. The median of the grouped MCQs-CC scores was 14 [12-16] for both. The scores didn't differ between the two techniques. For the 1st theme: the scores were negatively correlated (r=-0.58 and p=0.007). Students felt a better satisfaction for PMP evaluation (p<10-3), the elements provided by PMP were more relevant for decision-making process (p<10-3), the involvement was more felt with PMP (p<10-3) and difficulty was more felt with CCs (p<10-3). The effect of PMP was found to be significant on clinical reasoning (n=36), self-assessment (n=38), problem solving (n=40) and decision making (n=39). Students recommended strongly PMP as a tool of evaluation in ICM (p<10-3). CONCLUSION: scores were comparable between the two tested techniques. The positive perception of students regarding PMP encourages its generalization and teacher training must be strengthened.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Cuidados Críticos , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Competência Clínica/normas , Cuidados Críticos/normas , Cuidados Críticos/métodos , Masculino , Feminino , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Estudos de Viabilidade , Adulto Jovem
6.
Clin Lab ; 70(5)2024 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38747906

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Blood supply shortage may affect the health of patients who are transfusion-dependent. Consequently, blood donation plays an important role in the community as it can provide sufficient blood supply at blood bank centers. Medical sciences students can help promote blood donation. The current study aimed to assess the knowledge on, attitude toward, and barriers on blood donation among medical sciences students at the Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences of Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: An online questionnaire with 23 knowledge and attitude questions was established using Google Forms. Statistical analysis was performed based on gender and blood donation status (never donated, unable to donate, and donated blood). RESULTS: In total, 601 participants from six different departments responded to the questionnaire. Interestingly, female students had a higher rate of accurate responses toward the knowledge and attitude questions than male students (p < 0.01). Furthermore, students who previously donated had a higher rate of accurate responses to the questions than those who were not able to or never donated blood (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire was designed to assess the general knowledge and attitude of medical sciences students and barriers on blood donation. Female gender and a history of blood donation had a significant impact on responses. Therefore, more efforts are required to educate students regarding the importance of blood donation among patients who are transfusion-dependent.


Assuntos
Doadores de Sangue , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Doadores de Sangue/psicologia , Doadores de Sangue/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Arábia Saudita , Fatores Sexuais , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Doação de Sangue
7.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1291, 2024 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734610

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We are making progress in the fight against health-related misinformation, but mass participation and active engagement are far from adequate. Focusing on pre-professional medical students with above-average medical knowledge, our study examined whether and how third-person perceptions (TPP), which hypothesize that people tend to perceive media messages as having a greater effect on others than on themselves, would motivate their actions against misinformation. METHODS: We collected the cross-sectional data through a self-administered paper-and-pencil survey of 1,500 medical students in China during April 2022. RESULTS: Structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis, showed that TPP was negatively associated with medical students' actions against digital misinformation, including rebuttal of misinformation and promotion of corrective information. However, self-efficacy and collectivism served as positive predictors of both actions. Additionally, we found professional identification failed to play a significant role in influencing TPP, while digital misinformation self-efficacy was found to broaden the third-person perceptual gap and collectivism tended to reduce the perceptual bias significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Our study contributes both to theory and practice. It extends the third-person effect theory by moving beyond the examination of restrictive actions and toward the exploration of corrective and promotional actions in the context of misinformation., It also lends a new perspective to the current efforts to counter digital misinformation; involving pre-professionals (in this case, medical students) in the fight.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , China , Adulto Jovem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Autoeficácia , Adulto
8.
Pan Afr Med J ; 47: 90, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38737219

RESUMO

Introduction: alcohol and other psychoactive substances have adverse health effects, particularly on young people. This study determined the prevalence of alcohol and other psychoactive substance abuse and its association with depression among Niger Delta University, Bayelsa State, Nigeria, medical students. Methods: a cross-sectional study involving 243 medical students who completed a patient-rated version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-PR). For analyzing the data, descriptive and inferential statistics were employed. Results: most respondents were 18 to 24 years old (67.1%), and 52.7% were male; the prevalence of major depressive episodes (current) and lifetime alcohol and other psychoactive use was 30.5%, 25.5%, and 21%, respectively. Also, the prevalence of current alcohol abuse and dependence was 5.8% and 4.9%, respectively. Alcohol use (χ2: 12.57, p = 0.001) and abuse (χ2: 22.33, p = 0.001) were significantly associated with depression. Psychoactive substance use was significantly associated with depression (χ2: 12.91, p = 0.001). The odds of having depression increased with the use of alcohol (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.71-7.33) and psychoactive substances (OR: 4.52; 95% CI: 1.88-10.88). Conclusion: alcohol and psychoactive substance use were significantly associated with depression. Organizing interventions to reduce such unhealthy social practices among medical students is necessary.


Assuntos
Alcoolismo , Psicotrópicos , Estudantes de Medicina , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Humanos , Nigéria/epidemiologia , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Feminino , Prevalência , Adulto Jovem , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Alcoolismo/epidemiologia , Psicotrópicos/administração & dosagem , Psicotrópicos/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Universidades , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos
9.
Perspect Med Educ ; 13(1): 288-299, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38737396

RESUMO

Introduction: Despite its high potential, patient feedback does not always result in learning. For feedback to be effective students must engage with it, which partly depends on their perceptions of feedback. To better understand student engagement with patient feedback in a clinical context, this study explored the following research questions: 1) What are medical students' general beliefs about patient feedback and what are their specific perceptions of feedback messages? 2) What is the difference between these general beliefs and feedback message perceptions before and after patient feedback training? Methods: The study context was a 12-week clerkship combining Pediatrics and Gynecology, which included feedback training for students and asking for patient feedback. Ninety 4th-year medical students completed pre- and post-clerkship questionnaires. The questionnaires (Beliefs about Patient Feedback Questionnaire, Feedback Perception Questionnaire) were adapted from validated peer-feedback questionnaires. Questionnaires were quantitatively analyzed. Results: Both pre- and post-clerkship, students had positive general beliefs about patient feedback and positive perceptions of the feedback messages they received. However, paired t-tests showed that students' general beliefs and feedback message perceptions became less positive after feedback training and experience. Discussion: Patient feedback is not an easy means to learn and students do not become feedback literate in terms of patient feedback overnight. We suggest that future researchers further explore reasons for the decline in positive perceptions of patient feedback. We suggest implementing longitudinal feedback training in medical curricula, where students are guided and supported in the complex task of learning from patients through feedback.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico , Retroalimentação , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estágio Clínico/métodos , Feminino , Masculino , Percepção , Adulto , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos
10.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11396, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722734

RESUMO

Introduction: People with disabilities and those with non-English language preferences have worse health outcomes than their counterparts due to barriers to communication and poor continuity of care. As members of both groups, people who are Deaf users of American Sign Language have compounded health disparities. Provider discomfort with these specific demographics is a contributing factor, often stemming from insufficient training in medical programs. To help address these health disparities, we created a session on disability, language, and communication for undergraduate medical students. Methods: This 2-hour session was developed as a part of a 2020 curriculum shift for a total of 404 second-year medical student participants. We utilized a retrospective postsession survey to analyze learning objective achievement through a comparison of medians using the Wilcoxon signed rank test (α = .05) for the first 2 years of course implementation. Results: When assessing 158 students' self-perceived abilities to perform each of the learning objectives, students reported significantly higher confidence after the session compared to their retrospective presession confidence for all four learning objectives (ps < .001, respectively). Responses signifying learning objective achievement (scores of 4, probably yes, or 5, definitely yes), when averaged across the first 2 years of implementation, increased from 73% before the session to 98% after the session. Discussion: Our evaluation suggests medical students could benefit from increased educational initiatives on disability culture and health disparities caused by barriers to communication, to strengthen cultural humility, the delivery of health care, and, ultimately, health equity.


Assuntos
Currículo , Tomada de Decisão Compartilhada , Pessoas com Deficiência , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Barreiras de Comunicação , Inquéritos e Questionários , Masculino , Feminino , Língua de Sinais , Idioma
11.
World Neurosurg ; 185: e57-e74, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741330

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Nigeria has an inadequate number of neurosurgeons to meet the population's demand for neurosurgical care. Furthermore, few Nigerian neurosurgeons are female. This study sought to evaluate perceived barriers to pursuing neurosurgery among Nigerian trainees. METHODS: A 60-question survey was distributed electronically to medical students at the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, and unspecialized intern physicians at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Participation was voluntary. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-seven respondents participated in the survey. A greater proportion of males indicated an interest in neurosurgery than females (40% vs. 18%, P = 0.010). Over 75% of respondents identified decreased family and personal time, long work hours, and limited access to maternity or paternity leave as potential barriers to neurosurgery, with no differences by gender. Respondents overall saw being female and low-income as disadvantageous to pursuing neurosurgery in Nigeria. Although they universally viewed research as important in neurosurgery, 59% of respondents reported inadequate access to research opportunities; this did not vary by gender. However, 65% of female respondents reported that having a female neurosurgery mentor would increase their interest in neurosurgery (vs. 37% of males, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Nigerian medical trainees perceived the time commitment of neurosurgery as a major barrier to pursuing the specialty. Regardless of gender, they also reported low exposure to neurosurgery and inadequate access to research and mentorship opportunities. However, we found that enhanced female representation among neurosurgery mentors and improved work-life balance could increase interest in neurosurgery and help expand Nigeria's neurosurgical workforce.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Neurocirurgia , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Nigéria , Feminino , Masculino , Neurocirurgia/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Adulto , Inquéritos e Questionários , Médicos/psicologia , Neurocirurgiões , Adulto Jovem
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 525, 2024 May 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38730313

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Many health professions education programs involve people with lived experience as expert speakers. Such presentations may help learners better understand the realities of living with chronic illness or experiencing an acute health problem. However, lectures from only one or a small number of people may not adequately illustrate the perspectives and experiences of a diverse patient cohort. Additionally, logistical constraints such as public health restrictions or travel barriers may impede in-person presentations, particularly among people who have more restrictions on their time. Health professions education programs may benefit from understanding the potential effects of online patient-led presentations with a diverse set of speakers. We aimed to explore whether patient-led online learning modules about diabetes care would influence learners' responses to clinical scenarios and to collect learners' feedback about the modules. METHOD: This within-subjects randomized experiment involved 26 third-year medical students at Université Laval in Quebec, Canada. Participation in the experiment was an optional component within a required course. Prior to the intervention, participating learners responded to three clinical scenarios randomly selected from a set of six such scenarios. Each participant responded to the other three scenarios after the intervention. The intervention consisted of patient-led online learning modules incorporating segments of narratives from 21 patient partners (11 racialized or Indigenous) describing why and how clinicians could provide patient-centered care. Working with clinical teachers and psychometric experts, we developed a scoring grid based on the biopsychosocial model and set 0.6 as a passing score. Independent evaluators, blinded to whether each response was collected before or after the intervention, then scored learners' responses to scenarios using the grid. We used Fisher's Exact test to compare proportions of passing scores before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Learners' overall percentage of passing scores prior to the intervention was 66%. Following the intervention, the percentage of passing scores was 76% (p = 0.002). Overall, learners expressed appreciation and other positive feedback regarding the patient-led online learning modules. DISCUSSION: Findings from this experiment suggest that learners can learn to provide better patient-centered care by watching patient-led online learning modules created in collaboration with a diversity of patient partners.


Assuntos
Educação a Distância , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Instrução por Computador/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Participação do Paciente , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Projetos Piloto , Quebeque , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 548, 2024 May 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38760738

RESUMO

In March 2020, universities in Zimbabwe temporarily closed and switched to remote learning to contain the spread of SARS Cov2 infections. The sudden change to distance learning gave autonomy to students to direct their own learning. To understand how the students at the University of Zimbabwe and Midlands State University adapted to emergency remote learning, focus group discussions and a self-administered questionnaire survey based on the self-regulated learning inventory were conducted to capture cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of anatomy learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns among these students' lived experiences. Two coders analyzed the data independently and discussed the codes to reach a consensus. The results showed that students at the two medical schools cognitively and meta-cognitively planned, executed and evaluated self-regulated strategies in different ways that suited their environments during the COVID-19 lockdown. Several factors, such as demographic location, home setting/situation, socioeconomic background and expertise in using online platforms, affected the students' self-directed learning. Students generally adapted well to the constraints brought about by the lockdown on their anatomy learning in order to learn effectively. This study was able to highlight important self-regulated learning strategies that were implemented during COVID-19 by anatomy learners, especially those in low-income settings, and these strategies equip teachers and learners alike in preparation for similar future situations that may result in forced remote learning of anatomy.


Assuntos
Anatomia , COVID-19 , Educação a Distância , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Anatomia/educação , Zimbábue , Masculino , Feminino , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , SARS-CoV-2 , Pobreza , Adulto Jovem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Pandemias , Grupos Focais , Autoaprendizagem como Assunto
14.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302538, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38768187

RESUMO

The problem of gender discrimination and sexual harassment in medicine is long-standing and widespread. This project aims to document and understand how gendered experiences encountered by final-year medical students in Switzerland are experienced by these individuals and how they influence their career choice. It also aims to identify representations and stereotypes linked to the different specialties. The project will take place at all Swiss universities offering a master's degree in human medicine, for a total of 9 programs. Around 36 participants will be recruited. Semi-structured qualitative individual interviews will be conducted. Analysis will be based on Grounded Theory principles.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Suíça , Feminino , Masculino , Sexismo/psicologia , Assédio Sexual/psicologia
15.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2350251, 2024 Dec 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38720424

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Indigenous Peoples in Canada bear a disproportionate burden of disease and experience poorer health outcomes as compared to non-Indigenous populations within Canada; these conditions are said to be mediated and exacerbated by pervasive and uninterrupted anti-Indigenous racism. Third and fourth-year medical students at a Canadian medical school were asked to reflect on their experiences working with Indigenous patients in clinical settings, and how their preclinical Indigenous health curriculum impacted these experiences. METHOD: Phenomenology was used, guided by Goffman's theory of social stigma. Eleven undergraduate medical students were recruited using purposeful sampling. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted to gain an in-depth understanding of the participants' experiences. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using the four main processes for phenomenological analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from students' descriptions of clinical experiences involving Indigenous patients: 1) students describe how their Indigenous patients encounter the health care system and their own lack of cultural sensitivity in this context; 2) racism was evident in students' clinical interactions with Indigenous patients, but students do not always perceive these biases nor the impact of this on patient care; 3) identifying the impact of racism on care is complicated by situational clinical encounters; and 4) practicality of preclinical Indigenous health education is desired by students to prepare them for working with Indigenous patients in the clinical setting. CONCLUSIONS: In their clinical experiences, students witness racism against Indigenous peoples yet are unprepared to stand up against it. Findings highlight the importance of enhancing undergraduate medical training to allow students to better understand the unique experiences and perspectives of Indigenous patients. The results support the need for ongoing Indigenous health education, to foster culturally sensitive experiences while learning about Indigenous patients.


Assuntos
Racismo , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Canadá , Racismo/psicologia , Feminino , Masculino , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração , Competência Cultural , Entrevistas como Assunto , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Povos Indígenas/psicologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde
16.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303445, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38723002

RESUMO

Imposter syndrome (IS) and low self-esteem (SE) are common issues affecting medical students that can impact their well-being and development. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and factors associated with IS and SE among medical students at Jazan University, Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 523 medical students in years 2-6 at Jazan University, Saudi Arabia, completed validated questionnaires on IS (Young Imposter Scale) and SE (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). Sociodemographic factors were also collected. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were used to analyze IS and SE prevalence and correlates. Five hundred twenty-three students with a mean age of 22.09 ± 1.933 participated. The prevalence of low SE and positive IS was 17.6% and 24.3%, respectively. IS and SE had a significant negative correlation (p<0.001). Several sociodemographic factors were associated with increased IS, including 2nd and 4th-year students, forced study choice, and a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0-3.49 (P<0.05). Paternal education beyond high school was associated with lower IS (P<0.05). Logistic regression analyses confirmed that 2nd-year students had a 3.88 times higher odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI); 2.19-6.88), and 4th-year students had a 2.37 times higher OR (95% CI; 1.40-4.02) of IS than other years. For SE, advanced academic years, forced study choice, 7+ hours of sleep, and a GPA above 3.5 were associated with higher levels (P<0.05). Negative self-appraisals were associated with lower SE, while positive attitudes were associated with higher SE (P<0.05). Our study reveals that IS and low SE are prevalent among Jazan University, Saudi Arabia, medical students. Therefore, intervention courses that address these issues in medical education at Jazan University, Saudi Arabia, may be necessary to support medical students' well-being and academic success.


Assuntos
Autoimagem , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Arábia Saudita/epidemiologia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Masculino , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Prevalência , Adulto Jovem , Universidades , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Transtornos Dismórficos Corporais/epidemiologia , Transtornos Dismórficos Corporais/psicologia , Transtornos de Ansiedade
17.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e082910, 2024 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724055

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that explore the effectiveness of interventions to enhance medical student well-being. DESIGN: Overview of systematic reviews. DATA SOURCES: The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, APA PsychInfo, CINAHL and Scopus were searched from database inception until 31 May 2023 to identify systematic reviews of interventions to enhance medical student well-being. Ancestry searching and citation chasing were also conducted. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: The Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews V.2 tool was used to appraise the quality of the included reviews. A narrative synthesis was conducted, and the evidence of effectiveness for each intervention was rated. RESULTS: 13 reviews (with 94 independent studies and 17 616 students) were included. The reviews covered individual-level and curriculum-level interventions. Individual interventions included mindfulness (n=12), hypnosis (n=6), mental health programmes (n=7), yoga (n=4), cognitive and behavioural interventions (n=1), mind-sound technology (n=1), music-based interventions (n=1), omega-3 supplementation (n=1), electroacupuncture (n=1) and osteopathic manipulative treatment (n=1). The curriculum-level interventions included pass/fail grading (n=4), problem-based curriculum (n=2) and multicomponent curriculum reform (n=2). Most interventions were not supported by sufficient evidence to establish effectiveness. Eleven reviews were rated as having 'critically low' quality, and two reviews were rated as having 'low' quality. CONCLUSIONS: Individual-level interventions (mindfulness and mental health programmes) and curriculum-level interventions (pass/fail grading) can improve medical student well-being. These conclusions should be tempered by the low quality of the evidence. Further high-quality research is required to explore additional effective interventions to enhance medical student well-being and the most efficient ways to implement and combine these for maximum benefit.


Assuntos
Estudantes de Medicina , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Saúde Mental , Currículo , Atenção Plena
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 503, 2024 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724945

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Understanding how medical students respond to financial and non-financial incentives is crucial for recruiting health workers and attracting health talents in medical education. However, both incentives are integrated in working practice, and existing theoretical studies have suggested that various income levels may influence the substitution effect of both incentives, while the empirical evidence is lacking. Furthermore, little attention has been paid to the intrinsic motivation. This study aimed to explore the substitution effect of extrinsic incentives at different income levels, also taking intrinsic altruism into account. METHODS: We used the behavioral data from Zhang et al.'s experiments, which involved discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to assess the job preferences of medical students from six teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The incentive factors included monthly income, work location, work environment, training and career development opportunities, work load, and professional recognition. Additionally, a lab-like experiment in the medical decision-making context was conducted to quantify altruism based on utility function. Furthermore, we separated the choice sets based on the actual income and distinguished the medical students on altruism. The willingness to pay (WTP) was used to estimate the substitution effect of incentives through conditional logit model. RESULTS: There was a significant substitution effect between non-financial and financial incentives. As income increased, non-financial incentives such as an excellent work environment, and sufficient career development became relatively more important. The impact of the increase in income on the substitution effect was more pronounced among individuals with higher altruism. Concerning the non-financial incentive work environment, in contrast to the growth of 546 CNY (84 USD) observed in the low-altruism group, the high-altruism group experienced a growth of 1040 CNY (160 USD) in the substitution effect. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in the income level exerted an influence on the substitution effect of non-financial incentives and financial incentives, especially in high-altruism medical students. Policymakers should attach importance to a favorable environment and promising career prospects on the basis of ensuring a higher income level. Medical school administrations should focus on promoting altruistic values in medical education, enhancing talent incentives and teaching strategies to encourage medical students to devote themselves to the medical professions.


Assuntos
Altruísmo , Escolha da Profissão , Renda , Motivação , Seleção de Pessoal , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , China , Feminino , Masculino , Adulto , Adulto Jovem , Médicos/psicologia
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 515, 2024 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724974

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Online teaching has gained popularity in recent years, but changes have been slower to implement in Lower or Medium Income Countries (LMIC). The aim of this research was to build upon educators' experiences of remote teaching during Covid-19 to inform the development of a blended learning approach for teaching pre-clinical subjects at the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (OAU). METHODS: The Critical Incident Technique (CIT) was used in this exploratory study. Participants were invited to either complete an online qualitative questionnaire or take part in an online structured interview, which were hosted on Microsoft platforms. Data were obtained from eighteen educators and were analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Findings suggest that most educators (72%) continued to engage with remote teaching post-pandemic. All lab-based practical topics returned to being in-person, and teachers' experiences highlighted that a new blended learning approach should focus on asynchronized online teaching of didactic subjects. Five main themes captured educators' experiences and lessons learned regarding online teaching including: skills and training, teachers' motivation and attitudes, internet and connectivity, learners' behaviors, and socio-economic constraints. CONCLUSION: Findings provided additional evidence on the way in which educators in LMIC would like to build upon the positive aspects of online teaching and move towards a blended learning model. However, the implementation of such an approach should consider students' and faculty's needs and socio-economic constraints.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Educação a Distância , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Nigéria , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Masculino , Feminino , Ensino
20.
Einstein (Sao Paulo) ; 22: RW0792, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38695476

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify, synthesize, and analyze the scientific knowledge produced regarding the implications of using clinical simulation for undergraduate nursing or medical students' motivation for learning. METHODS: The search for articles was conducted between July 28 and August 3, 2022, on the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, and SciELO databases. The following was used for the search: P - undergraduate students attending Nursing or Medicine courses; C - motivation for learning, and C - skills and clinical simulation laboratory. The following research question guided the study: "What are the implications of clinical simulation on the motivation for learning of undergraduate students of nursing and medicine?" Of the 1,783 articles found, 13 were included in the sample for analysis. All stages of the selection process were carried out by two independent evaluators. The results were presented as charts and a discursive report. RESULTS: The studies analyzed indicated the beneficial effects of clinical simulation on students' motivation, in addition to other gains such as competencies, technical and non-technical skills, knowledge, belonging, autonomy, clinical judgment, critical and reflective thinking, self-efficacy and decreased anxiety, self-management, and improvements in learning and learning climate. CONCLUSION: Clinical simulation provides a positive learning environment favorable to the development of technical and interpersonal skills and competencies, and raising the level of motivational qualities.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Aprendizagem , Motivação , Humanos , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Treinamento por Simulação/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos
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