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1.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 85(1): 1-7, 2024 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38300672

RESUMO

UK medical graduates will soon need to pass the medical licensing assessment, which assesses skills and knowledge in ethics using multiple choice questions (eg single best answer questions) and objective structured clinical examination. However, educational leaders have recognised that these methods lack the sophistication needed to accurately assess medical ethics. The reasons are two-fold. First, there may be a knowledge and practice gap in medical schools when it comes to preparing students for the assessment. To this end, this article shares peer advice about how best to use objective structured clinical examinations and single best answer questions for assessing medical ethics to help prepare students for the medical licensing assessment. Second, the design of the assessment is unlikely to adequately measure graduates' ethical values and behaviour in real world scenarios. Further work is needed to design assessments that are sophisticated enough to examine candidates' ethical reasoning and their actual behaviour.


Assuntos
Ética Médica , Exame Físico , Humanos , Resolução de Problemas , Faculdades de Medicina , Reino Unido
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 167, 2024 Feb 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38383416

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, and other sexual and gender identities (LGBTIQ+) individuals face health inequities. Additionally, medical students report a lack of confidence in providing specific health care to LGBTIQ + individuals, and medical schools do not offer the breadth and depth of coverage needed to fully prepare and make them comfortable in caring for these individuals. This study aims to characterize the teaching of curricular content related to LGBTIQ + health issues in medical schools in Chile. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional descriptive mixed-methods study based on a 15-question survey sent to school directors of the 24 medical schools in Chile, conducted between October 2020 and July 2021. The questions included in the study were mostly based on two pre-existing questionnaires covering content, assessment methods, and identification of barriers to teaching this content. RESULTS: The validated questionnaire was answered by 14 of 24 Chilean medical schools, with 11 schools (78.9%) declaring that they included some training in their curriculum. The predominant range of time allocated to LGBTIQ + training in medical programs was between 1 and 5 h. The most addressed topics were HIV (92.85%), sexual orientation (78.57%), and chronic disease risk in LGBTIQ + populations (78.57%). Most schools, accounting for 71.5%, considered the content they delivered to be "moderately insufficient" or "insufficient". Regarding the teaching methodologies, the most used were lectures (92.8%), clinical cases (42.9%), and clinical simulation (28.6%). CONCLUSION: Most surveyed medical schools reported curricular spaces dedicated to teaching health issues of LGBTIQ + individuals, primarily during the pre-internship training period. However, the time allocated is insufficient, and there is little approach to topics beyond the patient's sexual history or sexual orientation. Given the crucial role of medical schools, they must adopt both local and national strategies to enrich training focused on the care of LGBTIQ + patients.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Pessoas Transgênero , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Chile , Faculdades de Medicina , Identidade de Gênero , Comportamento Sexual
3.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0298203, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38349896

RESUMO

PURPOSE: A college degree is required to enter medical school in the United States. A remarkably high percentage of students entering college have pre-medical aspirations but relatively few end up as medical students. As an "applied science", education about medicine is usually thought to be beyond the purview of a liberal arts curriculum. Students therefore receive little education about a medical career, or information about the many alternative careers in health science. Instead, they take courses for Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) preparation and medical school application prerequisites in biology, chemistry, physics, and math. These classes give them little insight into a real medical career. The current report considers this mismatch between student needs in health science and available resources in colleges across the United States. METHODS: A Collective Case Series framework was used to obtain qualitative data. Key informant interviews were requested from a convenience sample of representatives from 20 colleges, with six colleges providing extensive data. Three institutions collected data specifically on students who matriculated college interested in a career as a physician. RESULTS: At these schools, one-half to one-quarter of students who said they were interested in medicine at the beginning of college ended up not applying to medical school. At each of the six schools, we saw a wide range of generally sparse academic and professional advising involvement and a very limited number of classes that discussed concepts directly related to careers in health science. CONCLUSIONS: Looking at this data, we provide a novel conceptual model as a potential testable solution to the problem of an underexposed and unprepared student population interested in medicine. This includes a brief series of courses intended to inform students about what a career in medicine would fully entail to help foster core competencies of empathy, compassion and resilience.


Assuntos
Currículo , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Escolaridade , Teste de Admissão Acadêmica , Faculdades de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão
4.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 3667, 2024 02 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38351035

RESUMO

Contraception and abortion topics are variably, but often poorly, addressed in medical school curricula. Restrictions on contraceptive and abortion care at faith-based hospitals may hinder comprehensive family planning training for medical students during Ob/Gyn clerkships. Here we investigated whether medical students at faith-based and non-faith-based clerkships experienced different observations during their Ob/Gyn clerkship and/or differences in self-perceived competency in patient counseling, objective knowledge, and perceived adequacy of training in contraception and abortion topics post-clerkship. A survey was distributed to third- and fourth-year medical students at New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine. Across all clerkship sites (n = 102 students), observations of, and competency in, contraceptive care was higher than in abortion care. Students at non-faith-based clerkship sites (n = 54) reported the highest levels of observation of contraceptive and abortion care (19.6-90.7%), while those at Catholic sites (n = 26) typically reported the lowest (7.7-34.6%). Students at non-faith-based sites reported significantly higher competency in contraceptive care and some aspects of abortion care, than those at Catholic, and some other faith-based sites (n = 48). Clerkship training at faith-based sites, specifically Catholic sites, resulted in poorer Ob/Gyn training, particularly in contraceptive care. Training outcomes in abortion care were poor at all Ob/Gyn clerkship sites.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico , Ginecologia , Obstetrícia , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Ginecologia/educação , Serviços de Planejamento Familiar , Faculdades de Medicina , Educação Sexual , Anticoncepcionais
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 141, 2024 Feb 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38351037

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Designing, developing, and implementing a course without assessing and prioritizing instructional needs may result in inefficiency due to the disregard for the actual needs of the target population. The present study aimed to determine and prioritize medical students' instructional needs regarding Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. METHODS: This survey study was carried out in three stages (2020-2021) using the Delphi technique. Purposive and snowball sampling methods were used to select the instructors. The students were selected through simple random sampling. The first round of the Delphi technique involved a questionnaire consisting of one open-ended question, completed by 49 basic/clinical faculty members and 47 senior medical students. In the second round, a 5-point Likert scale-based questionnaire was used to prioritize the instructional needs. The reliability of the questionnaire was verified by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. In the third round, a focus group was used. A total of six expert faculty members and one senior medical student were invited to the focus group session to prioritize the needs. Data were analyzed using Friedman's non-parametric ranking test in SPSS version 26. RESULTS: Ten instructional needs priorities were extracted, including common pharmacotherapies (antibiotics and narcotics), prescriptions, physiology, anatomy, physical examination, electrocardiography interpretation, radiography, computed tomography scans, serum electrolyte disorders, and cardiovascular and internal (endocrine and metabolic) diseases. The chi-squared calculated value (715.584) indicated a significant difference in the importance of the questionnaire's questions (P < 0.001). These questions did not have equal value, and the importance, from the respondent's point of view and the observed distribution of ranks, was not the output of a random factor. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study can be used to design MOOCs, revise instructional programs, and adapt the curriculum to meet the needs of general practitioners, which will, in turn, help meet the medical needs of the general population.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Faculdades de Medicina , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Currículo
6.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0296682, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38335189

RESUMO

Longitudinal research has provided systematic empirical data on the short- and long-term outcomes of admissions policies, curricular innovations, and complex decisions on students' academic progress. This study aimed to investigate the academic performance of medical students and related factors using cohort database collected from a medical school. The study participants included 134 medical students who graduated from Chonnam National University Medical School in 2022. The medical school's cohort database was used to collect data on demographics, admission, academic performance, extracurricular activities, and performance on the National Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). Participating in club activities had a significant association with medical students' academic advancement delay or leave of absence during the entire course of medical school (P = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the nationwide clinical knowledge mock examination during the fourth year of medical school was significantly associated with passing the KMLE (adjusted odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.22; P = 0.014). Extracurricular school activities (a non-cognitive student attribute) and a wide range of cognitive student attributes captured from the cohort database were associated with medical students' academic performance. In conclusion, this study can reinforce a strong emphasis on the inclusion of cognitive and non-cognitive information in medical school curricula and assessments in order to improve medical education programs and future postgraduate performance.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Faculdades de Medicina , Universidades
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(2): e240001, 2024 Feb 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38381434

RESUMO

Importance: Creating an inclusive and equitable learning environment is a national priority. Nevertheless, data reflecting medical students' perception of the climate of equity and inclusion are limited. Objective: To develop and validate an instrument to measure students' perceptions of the climate of equity and inclusion in medical school using data collected annually by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Promoting Diversity, Group Inclusion, and Equity tool was developed in 3 stages. A Delphi panel of 9 members identified survey items from preexisting AAMC data sources. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was performed on student responses to AAMC surveys to construct the tool, which underwent rigorous psychometric validation. Participants were undergraduate medical students at Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited medical schools in the US who completed the 2015 to 2019 AAMC Year 2 Questionnaire (Y2Q), the administrations of 2016 to 2020 AAMC Graduation Questionnaire (GQ), or both. Data were analyzed from August 2020 to November 2023. Exposures: Student race and ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Main Outcomes and Measures: Development and psychometric validation of the tool, including construct validity, internal consistency, and criterion validity. Results: Delphi panel members identified 146 survey items from the Y2Q and GQ reflecting students' perception of the climate of equity and inclusion, and responses to these survey items were obtained from 54 906 students for the Y2Q cohort (median [IQR] age, 24 [23-26] years; 29 208 [52.75%] were female, 11 389 [20.57%] were Asian, 4089 [7.39%] were multiracial, and 33 373 [60.28%] were White) and 61 998 for the GQ cohort (median [IQR] age, 27 [26-28] years; 30 793 [49.67%] were female, 13 049 [21.05%] were Asian, 4136 [6.67%] were multiracial, and 38 215 [61.64%] were White). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of student responses identified 8 factors for the Y2Q model (faculty role modeling; student empowerment; student fellowship; cultural humility; faculty support for students; fostering a collaborative and safe environment; discrimination: race, ethnicity, and gender; and discrimination: sexual orientation) and 5 factors for the GQ model (faculty role modeling; student empowerment; faculty support for students; discrimination: race, ethnicity, and gender; and discrimination: sexual orientation). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit (root mean square error of approximation of 0.05 [Y2Q] and 0.06 [GQ] and comparative fit indices of 0.95 [Y2Q] and 0.94 [GQ]). Cronbach α for individual factors demonstrated internal consistency ranging from 0.69 to 0.92 (Y2Q) and 0.76 to 0.95 (GQ). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that the new tool is a reliable and psychometrically valid measure of medical students' perceptions of equity and inclusion in the learning environment.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem , Asiático , Clima , Escolaridade , Diversidade, Equidade, Inclusão , Brancos
8.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(1): e2351526, 2024 Jan 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38206629

RESUMO

This cross-sectional study investigates characteristics, including sex, postgraduate experience, and specialty, of medical school deans and university hospital directors in Japan.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Medicina , Humanos , Japão , Hospitais Universitários
9.
J Surg Educ ; 81(3): 373-381, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38177035

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Stereotypes of surgeons are pervasive and play a role in medical students' decisions about pursuing a surgical career. This study aimed to determine: (1) how medical students' perceptions of surgery and surgeons changed following exposure to surgery during clerkship rotations; and (2) if gender and racial/ethnic identification played a role in this process. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this mixed-method study, clerkship students at one U.S. medical school were asked to anonymously contribute words and phrases that they associated with surgery to an online "word cloud" at the beginning and end of their 12-week surgery clerkship. In addition, an end-of-year, anonymous survey of their perceptions was administered and analyzed using a Grounded Theory approach. RESULTS: Of 154 students invited to complete the online survey, analysis of 24 completed surveys suggested that students believe surgical culture to be toxic, with unfriendly attitudes, strict hierarchy, and lack of work-life balance. Analysis of 678 Word Cloud responses, however, indicated that the frequency of complimentary responses increased following surgery clerkships (25% vs 36%; z = -3.26; p = 0.001), while the proportion of responses describing surgery/surgeons as male-dominated, egotistical, and scary decreased (5% vs 1%, z = 2.86, p = 0.004; 9% vs 4%, z = 2.78, p = 0.005; 3% vs 0.3%, z = 2.56, p = 0.011, respectively). The association between surgeons and being White disappeared entirely. Female students were more likely than male students to state that their perceptions did not change following exposure (40% vs 0%; z = 2.19; p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS: With exposure to surgery, students' preconceived notions may be positively influenced. However, students continue to hold negative perceptions, and this effect may be stratified by gender identification. Institutions should work to address these perceptions in pre-clerkship years to attract a more diverse pool of future surgeons.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Cirurgia Geral , Estudantes de Medicina , Cirurgiões , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Atitude , Inquéritos e Questionários , Faculdades de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Cirurgia Geral/educação
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 75, 2024 Jan 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38245755

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medical student master's theses are often carried out as research projects, and some are published as research papers in journals. We investigated the percentage of master's theses conducted by 5th -year students at the Medical Degree Program at Lund University, Sweden, that subsequently served as the basis for research publications. In addition, we explored both student and supervisor experiences with the publishing process. METHODS: A cohort of four semesters of student data covering the period from 2019 to 2020 (n = 446) was searched in PubMed, Embase and the Web of Science to assess whether they had been published as research papers. Surveys were sent to students (n = 121) and supervisors (n = 77) to explore their experiences with the publishing process. RESULTS: We found that 33% (149 of 446) of the students in the 2019-2020 cohort subsequently published their theses, and 50% of these students were listed as first authors. Most students published original research. Students (n = 21) and supervisors (n = 44) reported that the publishing process was time-consuming and that students needed multilevel support from supervisors to achieve successful publication. The publishing process was reported by 79% of the students to have led to additional learning. Most of the papers (126 of 149, 85%) had a clinical or patient-oriented focus. CONCLUSION: A high percentage of the student publications in which students are listed as first authors require engagement from both students and supervisors. Supervisors play an essential role in supporting students in a successful publication process. Most of the published papers were either clinical or patient-oriented research.


Assuntos
Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Editoração , Faculdades de Medicina , Aprendizagem , Pesquisadores
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 82, 2024 Jan 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38263009

RESUMO

Medical school candidates must have both the cognitive and professional competencies required to become good physicians. In this commentary, we outline the evidence and outcomes associated with the implementation of these selection methodologies and evaluate their ability to assess non-cognitive skills.


Assuntos
Médicos , Faculdades de Medicina , Humanos , Competência Profissional
12.
R I Med J (2013) ; 107(2): 40-43, 2024 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38285752

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aims to provide insight regarding the different qualities of international medical graduates (IMGs) involved in US orthopedic residency programs. METHODS: Orthopedic residency programs accredited by the ACGME and listed in the AMA database were screened. Data on program size and location, IMG year of training, the geographic region of IMG's medical schools, their research experiences and number of gap years were included. RESULTS: A total of 167(80.3%) orthopedic residency programs were included. A total of 3838 residents were identified, of which 44 (1.15%) were IMGs. The United Kingdom and Ireland had the highest number of matched IMGs with four (9.1%) each. Massachusetts was the state with the highest number of enrolled IMGs. On average, IMGs had 26.3 publications and joined US orthopedic residency 4.66 years following medical school graduation. CONCLUSION: Despite the many hurdles experienced by IMGs, a decent number succeeds in matching into US orthopedic residency programs each year.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Médicos Graduados Estrangeiros , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Avaliação Educacional , Faculdades de Medicina
13.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38197927

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In 2017, the Federal Constitutional Court ruled several aspects of the German student admission process unconstitutional. Consequently, the waiting time quota was replaced by an aptitude quota in 2020. Students are now allowed to simultaneously apply to all German medical faculties and an adjustment algorithm for school leaving grades from different federal states was introduced. The present study investigates the impact of these changes on the new study cohorts. METHODS: Records from the federal admission trust were used to compare the final two winter semesters before the change to the first three thereafter. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The impact of the new procedure on students with previous medical training cannot yet be conclusively assessed. While grade point average (GPA) and sex of the students remained comparable and students still prefer to study close to home; however, they have become younger. The adjustment for school leaving grades indeed led to equal opportunities for the individual applicant; however, this may aggravate the shortage of rural doctors. The current adjustment mechanism considers applicant numbers, yet less people apply from rural areas while at the same time these areas suffer from a shortage of physicians. As rural upbringing and education are the best predictors of rural practice after licensing, the shortage may worsen. To counteract this, the compensation mechanism for the school leaving grades could easily be adjusted.


Assuntos
Médicos , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Alemanha , Escolaridade , Faculdades de Medicina
14.
Harefuah ; 163(1): 4-9, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Hebraico | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38297412

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: THE FIGHTS OF OPENING NEW MEDICAL SCHOOLS IN ISRAEL - 1960-2024 - COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Medicina , Humanos , Israel
15.
Rural Remote Health ; 24(1): 8306, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38212295

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: There is now strong evidence to support the positive impact of place-based medical education on the recruitment and retention of the rural health workforce in Australia. Much of this work, however, has been undertaken in the context of 'extended rural clinical placement' - students undertaking part of their medical degree in a rural location. Until recently, there were only a few places in Australia in which students could undertake the entirety of their medical degree in a rural area. With the introduction of the Murray-Darling Medical Schools Network (MDMSN) initiative, this dynamic is changing. The MDMSN is part of the Stronger Rural Health Strategy and builds on the Australian Government's existing Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training Program to establish a network of rurally based medical programs in the Murray-Darling region. The MDMSN offers a unique opportunity to explore the effect of complete rural immersion during medical school on subsequent rural practice. This article describes the establishment of a research collaboration intended to ensure the harmonisation of research data collection from the outset of the MDMSN program. METHODS: The MDMSN research collaboration is a longitudinal, multi-university program of work to explore the effect of rurally based medical school programs in the Murray-Darling region. Initially it has been agreed that administrative student data will be collected from existing university datasets to help characterise this novel student cohort. Each university will then distribute an entry survey to all first-year MDMSN students. The survey will collect demographic information as well as information regarding rural background, preferences and future practice intention. Questions have been aligned with and adapted from the Medical Schools Outcomes Database survey, the Australian Bureau of Statistics, and from the literature. This information will be combined with graduate information from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. RESULTS: The MDMSN research collaboration will work toward the co-design of research projects, to facilitate and progress multi-site research addressing nationally relevant research questions. Early research efforts are focused on our ability to better understand the new cohort of students embarking on rurally based medical education, their practice intentions and realisation. Subsequent work of the collaboration may lead to deeper understanding of the rural student experience, any effect of 'place', changes in student professional identity over time, and their relationship to subsequent rural practice. CONCLUSION: The MDMSN research collaboration is a proactive initiative that brings together data and experience from five new rurally based medical programs, and answers calls for multi-institution and longitudinal studies. It is uniquely placed to capture the impact of the MDMSN program, including the effect of complete rural immersion on the future practice location of these graduates. Ultimately, the combined research efforts of the MDMSN research collaboration will add knowledge to address the known rural workforce maldistribution, particularly how to attract and retain medical workforce.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Austrália , Universidades , Faculdades de Medicina , Recursos Humanos , Escolha da Profissão , Área de Atuação Profissional
16.
BMJ Glob Health ; 9(1)2024 Jan 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38176745

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Medical schools, as significant and influential organisations within their communities, have the potential and the capacity to impact abortion policy. Organisations often engage in advocacy by issuing public statements that clarify their stance on specific policies. This study analyses the quantity and quality of publicly discoverable statements that US medical schools issued regarding Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization. METHODS: We conducted a mixed methods study using an explanatory sequential design. Using qualitative analysis, an inductive thematic approach was used to identify themes from public statements made within 6 months of 2 May 2022, Dobbs leak. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were used to assess the association between themes and institutional characteristics. RESULTS: Most institutions (n=124/188, 65.96%) did not issue public statements regarding Dobbs. Among all 188 US medical schools, allopathic institutions (OR=12.19, 95% CI (2.83 to 52.57), p=0.001), schools in protective states (OR=3.35, 95% CI (1.78 to 6.29), p<0.0001) and those with family planning divisions (OR=4.60, 95% CI (2.33 to 9.08), p<0.0001) were at increased odds of issuing statements. Of the 64 medical schools with statements, 64.06% (n=41/64) espoused pro-choice views, 34.37% (n=22) were neutral/non-committal and 1.56% (n=1) expressed antiabortion views. Those in protective states were at 3.35 times increased odds of issuing pro-choice statements (95% CI (1.16 to 9.72), p=0.03) compared with restrictive counterparts. CONCLUSION: Medical schools largely did not take a public stance on Dobbs. By refraining from actively engaging in this critical discourse, medical schools are foregoing a leadership opportunity to affect meaningful sociopolitical change, particularly in states with restrictive abortion laws.


Assuntos
Aborto Induzido , Faculdades de Medicina , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Liderança , Serviços de Planejamento Familiar , Políticas
17.
Neurosurg Focus ; 56(1): E17, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38163346

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Despite mixed reality being an emerging tool for tailored neurosurgical treatment and safety enhancement, the use of mixed reality in the education of German medical students is not established in the field of neurosurgery. The present study aimed to investigate medical students' perspectives on the use of mixed reality in neurosurgical medical education. METHODS: Between July 3, 2023, and August 31, 2023, an online survey was completed by German medical students through their affiliated student associations and educational institutions. The survey included 16 items related to mixed reality in neurosurgery, with participants providing ratings on a 4-point Likert scale to indicate their level of agreement with these statements. RESULTS: A total of 150 students from 27 medical schools in Germany took part in the survey. A significant majority comprising 131 (87.3%) students expressed strong to intense interest in mixed-reality courses in neurosurgery, and 108 (72%) reported an interest in incorporating mixed reality into their curriculum. Furthermore, 94.7% agreed that mixed reality may enhance their understanding of operative neuroanatomy and 72.7% agreed with the idea that teaching via mixed-reality methods may increase the probability of the use of mixed reality in their future career. The majority (116/150 [77.3%]) reported that the preferred optimum timepoint for teaching with mixed reality might be within the first 3 years of medical school. In particular, more students in the first 2 years preferred to start mixed-reality courses in the first 2 years of medical school compared to students in their 3rd to 6th years of medical school (71.9% vs 41.5%, p = 0.003). Residents and attending specialists were believed to be appropriate teachers by 118 students (78.7%). CONCLUSIONS: German medical students exhibited significant interest and willingness to engage in mixed reality in neurosurgery. Evidently, there is a high demand for medical schools to provide mixed-reality courses. Students seem to prefer the courses as early as possible in their medical school education in order to transfer preclinical neuroanatomical knowledge into operative neurosurgical anatomy by using this promising technique.


Assuntos
Realidade Aumentada , Neurocirurgia , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Faculdades de Medicina , Neurocirurgia/educação , Currículo , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 60(1)2024 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38256419

RESUMO

Background and Objectives: The acquisition of practical skills at medical school is an important part of the multidimensional education program of future physicians. However, medical schools throughout the world have been slow in incorporating practical skills in their curriculum. Therefore, the aims of the present prospective study were (a) to demonstrate the feasibility of such surgical training, (b) to objectify its benefit in medical education, and (c) to investigate the impact of such training on subsequent career choices. Material and Methods: We introduced a two-day laparoscopy course on the pelvitrainer as part of the curriculum of the gynecological internship of fifth year medical students from 2019 to 2020. The results of the students' training were matched to those of surgeons who completed the same curriculum in a professional postgraduate laparoscopy course from 2017 to 2020 in a comparative study design. Additionally, we performed a questionnaire-based evaluation of the impact of the course on medical education and subsequent career choices directly before and after completing the course. Results: A total of 261 medical students and 206 physicians completed the training program. At baseline, the students performed significantly more poorly than physicians in a median of three of four exercises (p < 0.001). However, this evened out in the final runs, during which students performed more poorly than physicians only in one exercise and even better than physicians in one. The general integration of surgical training in medical school curricula was rated very low (12.4% on the VAS, IQR 3-16%) despite the high demand for such training. In the survey, the course was deemed very beneficial for medical education (median VAS 80.7%, IQR 73-98%), but did not appear to influence the students' subsequent career preferences. Conclusions: The acquisition of practical surgical skills during medical school is significantly under-represented in many medical faculties. The benefits of such training, as demonstrated in our study, would improve the education of future physicians.


Assuntos
Estudantes de Medicina , Cirurgiões , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Faculdades de Medicina , Estudos de Viabilidade , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos
19.
Nutrients ; 16(2)2024 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38257170

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the first year of medical school on the relationship between nutritional knowledge and sleep. To achieve this, first-year medical students at Wroclaw Medical University were invited to participate in the study during both the initial and final months of their first academic year. The study included 570 students in the initial period and 705 in the latter. The research questionnaire comprised the KomPAN, assessing nutritional knowledge, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), evaluating sleep quality. The majority of students demonstrated at least sufficient nutritional knowledge, while approximately two-thirds of students experienced poor sleep in both periods. Notably, sleep quality further deteriorated in the second period (PSQI total score: 6.86 vs. 7.38, p = 0.0157). This change was influenced mainly by a decrease in sleep duration and an increase in the use of sleep medications (both p < 0.0001). The significant difference in overall sleep quality between different nutritional knowledge levels emerged only in the second semester, where students with the highest nutritional knowledge slept the best, while those with the lowest slept the worst (p = 0.0001). Crucially, in both periods, the use of sleep medications was highest among individuals with insufficient nutritional knowledge. Throughout the academic year, the usage increased for all except those with the highest nutritional knowledge, who exhibited the best sleep (p < 0.0001). The escalating use of sleep medications among medical students warrants greater attention, and leveraging the relationship between nutritional knowledge and sleep could prove beneficial, as positive habits in one domain may positively influence the other.


Assuntos
Qualidade do Sono , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Polônia , Faculdades de Medicina , Universidades
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