Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 7.565
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303137, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722911

RESUMO

The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a significant public health concern owing to its expanding habitat and vector competence. Disease outbreaks attributed to this species have been reported in areas under its invasion, and its northward expansion in Japan has caused concern because of the potential for dengue virus infection in newly populated areas. Accurate prediction of Ae. albopictus distribution is crucial to prevent the spread of the disease. However, limited studies have focused on the prediction of Ae. albopictus distribution in Japan. Herein, we used the random forest model, a machine learning approach, to predict the current and potential future habitat ranges of Ae. albopictus in Japan. The model revealed that these mosquitoes prefer urban areas over forests in Japan on the current map. Under predictions for the future, the species will expand its range to the surrounding areas and eventually reach many areas of northeastern Kanto, Tohoku District, and Hokkaido, with a few variations in different scenarios. However, the affected human population is predicted to decrease owing to the declining birth rate. Anthropogenic and climatic factors contribute to range expansion, and urban size and population have profound impacts. This prediction map can guide responses to the introduction of this species in new areas, advance the spatial knowledge of diseases vectored by it, and mitigate the possible disease burden. To our knowledge, this is the first distribution-modelling prediction for Ae. albopictus with a focus on Japan.


Assuntos
Aedes , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Aedes/virologia , Aedes/fisiologia , Japão , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Ecossistema , Humanos , Distribuição Animal , Dengue/transmissão , Dengue/epidemiologia , Aprendizado de Máquina , Modelos Biológicos
2.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303027, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728353

RESUMO

Insecticide resistance in mosquitoes is spreading worldwide and represents a growing threat to vector control. Insecticide resistance is caused by different mechanisms including higher metabolic detoxication, target-site modification, reduced penetration and behavioral changes that are not easily detectable with simple diagnostic methods. Indeed, most molecular resistance diagnostic tools are costly and labor intensive and then difficult to use for routine monitoring of insecticide resistance. The present study aims to determine whether mosquito susceptibility status against the pyrethroid insecticides (mostly used for mosquito control) could be established by the protein signatures of legs and/or thoraxes submitted to MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry (MS). The quality of MS spectra for both body parts was controlled to avoid any bias due to unconformity protein profiling. The comparison of MS profiles from three inbreeds Ae. aegypti lines from French Guiana (IRF, IR03, IR13), with distinct deltamethrin resistance genotype / phenotype and the susceptible reference laboratory line BORA (French Polynesia), showed different protein signatures. On both body parts, the analysis of whole protein profiles revealed a singularity of BORA line compared to the three inbreeding lines from French Guiana origin, suggesting that the first criteria of differentiation is the geographical origin and/or the breeding history rather than the insecticide susceptibility profile. However, a deeper analysis of the protein profiles allowed to identify 10 and 11 discriminating peaks from leg and thorax spectra, respectively. Among them, a specific peak around 4870 Da was detected in legs and thoraxes of pyrethroid resistant lines compared to the susceptible counterparts hence suggesting that MS profiling may be promising to rapidly distinguish resistant and susceptible phenotypes. Further work is needed to confirm the nature of this peak as a deltamethrin resistant marker and to validate the routine use of MS profiling to track insecticide resistance in Ae. aegypti field populations.


Assuntos
Aedes , Resistência a Inseticidas , Inseticidas , Nitrilas , Piretrinas , Espectrometria de Massas por Ionização e Dessorção a Laser Assistida por Matriz , Animais , Piretrinas/farmacologia , Aedes/efeitos dos fármacos , Aedes/genética , Aedes/metabolismo , Resistência a Inseticidas/genética , Nitrilas/farmacologia , Espectrometria de Massas por Ionização e Dessorção a Laser Assistida por Matriz/métodos , Inseticidas/farmacologia , Mosquitos Vetores/efeitos dos fármacos , Mosquitos Vetores/genética , Dengue/virologia , Proteínas de Insetos/genética , Proteínas de Insetos/metabolismo , Feminino
3.
Sci Adv ; 10(19): eadj6990, 2024 May 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728404

RESUMO

Mosquito-borne diseases like malaria are rising globally, and improved mosquito vector surveillance is needed. Survival of Anopheles mosquitoes is key for epidemiological monitoring of malaria transmission and evaluation of vector control strategies targeting mosquito longevity, as the risk of pathogen transmission increases with mosquito age. However, the available tools to estimate field mosquito age are often approximate and time-consuming. Here, we show a rapid method that combines matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with deep learning for mosquito age prediction. Using 2763 mass spectra from the head, legs, and thorax of 251 field-collected Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes, we developed deep learning models that achieved a best mean absolute error of 1.74 days. We also demonstrate consistent performance at two ecological sites in Senegal, supported by age-related protein changes. Our approach is promising for malaria control and the field of vector biology, benefiting other disease vectors like Aedes mosquitoes.


Assuntos
Anopheles , Aprendizado Profundo , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Anopheles/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia , Malária/transmissão , Malária/prevenção & controle , Espectrometria de Massas por Ionização e Dessorção a Laser Assistida por Matriz/métodos , Senegal , Espectrometria de Massas/métodos , Envelhecimento/fisiologia
4.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 222, 2024 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38745242

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Culex pipiens pallens is a well-known mosquito vector for several diseases. Deltamethrin, a commonly used pyrethroid insecticide, has been frequently applied to manage adult Cx. pipiens pallens. However, mosquitoes can develop resistance to these insecticides as a result of insecticide misuse and, therefore, it is crucial to identify novel methods to control insecticide resistance. The relationship between commensal bacteria and vector resistance has been recently recognized. Bacteriophages (= phages) are effective tools by which to control insect commensal bacteria, but there have as yet been no studies using phages on adult mosquitoes. In this study, we isolated an Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH that specifically targets resistance-associated symbiotic bacteria in mosquitoes. We investigated the impact of Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH in an abundance of Aeromonas hydrophila in the gut of Cx. pipiens pallens and its effect on the status of deltamethrin resistance. METHODS: Phages were isolated on double-layer agar plates and their biological properties analyzed. Phage morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after negative staining. The phage was then introduced into the mosquito intestines via oral feeding. The inhibitory effect of Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH on Aeromonas hydrophila in mosquito intestines was assessed through quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Deltamethrin resistance of mosquitoes was assessed using WHO bottle bioassays. RESULTS: An Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH was isolated from sewage and identified as belonging to the Myoviridae family in the order Caudovirales using TEM. Based on biological characteristics analysis and in vitro antibacterial experiments, Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH was observed to exhibit excellent stability and effective bactericidal activity. Sequencing revealed that the Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH genome comprises 43,663 bp (51.6% CG content) with 81 predicted open reading frames. No integrase-related gene was detected in the vB AH-LH genome, which marked it as a potential biological antibacterial. Finally, we found that Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH could significantly reduce deltamethrin resistance in Cx. pipiens pallens, in both the laboratory and field settings, by decreasing the abundance of Aeromonas hydrophila in their midgut. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that Aeromonas phage vB AhM-LH could effectively modulate commensal bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila in adult mosquitoes, thus representing a promising strategy to mitigate mosquito vector resistance.


Assuntos
Aeromonas hydrophila , Bacteriófagos , Culex , Resistência a Inseticidas , Nitrilas , Piretrinas , Animais , Aeromonas hydrophila/virologia , Aeromonas hydrophila/efeitos dos fármacos , Culex/virologia , Culex/microbiologia , Bacteriófagos/fisiologia , Bacteriófagos/isolamento & purificação , Bacteriófagos/genética , Piretrinas/farmacologia , Nitrilas/farmacologia , Inseticidas/farmacologia , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Mosquitos Vetores/microbiologia , Feminino
5.
Malar J ; 23(1): 135, 2024 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38711028

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The direct membrane feeding assay (DMFA), whereby gametocyte-infected blood is collected from human donors and from which mosquitoes feed through a membrane, is proving essential for assessing parameters influencing Plasmodium transmission potential in endemic countries. The success of DMFAs is closely tied to gametocyte density in the blood, with relatively high gametocytaemia ensuring optimal infection levels in mosquitoes. As transmission intensity declines with control efforts, the occurrence of asymptomatic individuals with low gametocyte densities, who can significantly contribute to the infectious reservoir, is increasing. This poses a limitation to studies relying on the experimental infection of large numbers of mosquitoes with natural isolates of Plasmodium. A simple, field-applicable method is presented for improving parasite infectivity by concentrating Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes. METHODS: Anopheles gambiae received one of the following 5 blood treatments through DMFA: (i) whole blood (WB) samples from naturally-infected donors; (ii) donor blood whose plasma was replaced with the same volume of Plasmodium-naive AB + serum (1:1 control); (iii) plasma replaced with a volume of malaria-naïve AB + serum equivalent to half (1:1/2), or to a quarter (1:1/4), of the initial plasma volume; and (v) donor blood whose plasma was fully removed (RBC). The experiment was repeated 4 times using 4 distinct wild parasite isolates. Seven days post-infection, a total of 1,095 midguts were examined for oocyst presence. RESULTS: Substituting plasma with reduced amounts (1:1/2 and 1:1/4) of Plasmodium-naive AB + serum led to a 31% and 17% increase of the mosquito infection rate and to a 85% and 308% increase in infection intensity compared to the 1:1 control, respectively. The full removal of plasma (RBC) reduced the infection rate by 58% and the intensity by 64% compared to the 1:1 control. Reducing serum volumes (1:1/2; 1:1/4 and RBC) had no impact on mosquito feeding rate and survival when compared to the 1:1 control. CONCLUSIONS: Concentrating gametocytic blood by replacing natural plasma by lower amount of naive serum can enhance the success of mosquito infection. In an area with low gametocyte density, this simple and practical method of parasite concentration can facilitate studies on human-to-mosquito transmission such as the evaluation of transmission-blocking interventions.


Assuntos
Anopheles , Mosquitos Vetores , Plasmodium falciparum , Plasmodium falciparum/fisiologia , Animais , Anopheles/parasitologia , Mosquitos Vetores/parasitologia , Humanos , Malária Falciparum/parasitologia , Malária Falciparum/transmissão , Feminino , Comportamento Alimentar
6.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 201, 2024 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38711091

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The rising burden of mosquito-borne diseases in Europe extends beyond urban areas, encompassing rural and semi-urban regions near managed and natural wetlands evidenced by recent outbreaks of Usutu and West Nile viruses. While wetland management policies focus on biodiversity and ecosystem services, few studies explore the impact on mosquito vectors. METHODS: Our research addresses this gap, examining juvenile mosquito and aquatic predator communities in 67 ditch sites within a South England coastal marsh subjected to different wetland management tiers. Using joint distribution models, we analyse how mosquito communities respond to abiotic and biotic factors influenced by wetland management. RESULTS: Of the 12 mosquito species identified, Culiseta annulata (Usutu virus vector) and Culex pipiens (Usutu and West Nile virus vector) constitute 47% of 6825 larval mosquitoes. Abundant predators include Coleoptera (water beetles) adults, Corixidae (water boatmen) and Zygoptera (Damselfy) larvae. Models reveal that tier 3 management sites (higher winter water levels, lower agricultural intensity) associated with shade and less floating vegetation are preferred by specific mosquito species. All mosquito species except Anopheles maculipennis s.l., are negatively impacted by potential predators. Culiseta annulata shows positive associations with shaded and turbid water, contrary to preferences of Corixidae predators. CONCLUSIONS: Tier 3 areas managed for biodiversity, characterised by higher seasonal water levels and reduced livestock grazing intensity, provide favourable habitats for key mosquito species that are known vectors of arboviruses, such as Usutu and West Nile. Our findings emphasise the impact of biodiversity-focused wetland management, altering mosquito breeding site vegetation to enhance vector suitability. Further exploration of these trade-offs is crucial for comprehending the broader implications of wetland management.


Assuntos
Biodiversidade , Culicidae , Mosquitos Vetores , Áreas Alagadas , Animais , Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Culicidae/classificação , Culicidae/fisiologia , Culicidae/virologia , Ecossistema , Larva/fisiologia , Estações do Ano , Reino Unido , Culex/fisiologia , Culex/virologia , Culex/classificação , Inglaterra
7.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303473, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38743768

RESUMO

Urban malaria has become a challenge for most African countries due to urbanization, with increasing population sizes, overcrowding, and movement into cities from rural localities. The rapid expansion of cities with inappropriate water drainage systems, abundance of water storage habitats, coupled with recurrent flooding represents a concern for water-associated vector borne diseases, including malaria. This situation could threaten progress made towards malaria elimination in sub-Saharan countries, including Senegal, where urban malaria has presented as a threat to national elimination gains. To assess drivers of urban malaria in Senegal, a 5-month study was carried out from August to December 2019 in three major urban areas and hotspots for malaria incidence (Diourbel, Touba, and Kaolack) including the rainy season (August-October) and partly dry season (November-December). The aim was to characterize malaria vector larval habitats, vector dynamics across both seasons, and to identify the primary eco- environmental entomological factors contributing to observed urban malaria transmission. A total of 145 Anopheles larval habitats were found, mapped, and monitored monthly. This included 32 in Diourbel, 83 in Touba, and 30 in Kaolack. The number of larval habitats fluctuated seasonally, with a decrease during the dry season. In Diourbel, 22 of the 32 monitored larval habitats (68.75%) were dried out by December and considered temporary, while the remaining 10 (31.25%) were classified as permanent. In the city of Touba 28 (33.73%) were temporary habitats, and of those 57%, 71% and 100% dried up respectively by October, November, and December. However, 55 (66.27%) habitats were permanent water storage basins which persisted throughout the study. In Kaolack, 12 (40%) permanent and 18 (60%) temporary Anopheles larval habitats were found and monitored during the study. Three malaria vectors (An. arabiensis, An. pharoensis and An. funestus s.l.) were found across the surveyed larval habitats, and An. arabiensis was found in all three cities and was the only species found in the city of Diourbel, while An. arabiensis, An. pharoensis, and An. funestus s.l. were detected in the cities of Touba and Kaolack. The spatiotemporal observations of immature malaria vectors in Senegal provide evidence of permanent productive malaria vector larval habitats year-round in three major urban centers in Senegal, which may be driving high urban malaria incidence. This study aimed to assess the presence and type of anopheline larvae habitats in urban areas. The preliminary data will better inform subsequent detailed additional studies and seasonally appropriate, cost-effective, and sustainable larval source management (LSM) strategies by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP).


Assuntos
Anopheles , Cidades , Ecossistema , Larva , Malária , Mosquitos Vetores , Estações do Ano , Animais , Anopheles/parasitologia , Senegal/epidemiologia , Malária/epidemiologia , Malária/transmissão , Mosquitos Vetores/parasitologia , Incidência , Humanos
8.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0301816, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38743802

RESUMO

The yeast-encapsulated orange oil (YEOO) is a novel larvicide under development against vector mosquitoes. Despite its efficiency against Aedes aegypti (L.) in small scale experiments, its applicability in vector control can be influenced by other effects on mosquito behaviour or physiology. For this reason, the impact of YEOO particles in mosquito oviposition was evaluated in laboratory and semi-field conditions. Oviposition assays with one gravid Aedes aegypti female were carried under laboratory and semi-field conditions with natural light and temperature fluctuation. For all ovitraps, the number of eggs was manually counted in the wooden paddle and in the solution of each ovitrap. The proportion of eggs between substrates (wooden paddle and solution) varied between conditions, with females in laboratory presenting a lower preference to lay eggs in paddles when compared with studies in semi-field. This behaviour shifts in laboratory can create challenges to extrapolate results from laboratory to the field. Here, studies in both conditions indicate a similar impact of YEOO particles in Aedes aegypti oviposition. The potential treatment concentration of YEOO particles presents a strong repellent/deterrent effect (-0.559 > OAI > -0.760) within the initial 72h of application when compared with water, and weak repellent/deterrent signal (OAI = -0.220) when compared against inactivated yeast. Control ovitraps with water were more positive for egg presence than treated ovitraps, while ovitraps with YEOO particles and inactivated yeast present similar number of positive ovitraps. It is possible that the repellent/deterrent action is partially driven by the delivery system, since most times Citrus sinensis EO oviposition repellent/deterrent signal is weak, and it seem influenced by solvent/delivery used. However, it is unclear how the yeast wall that protect/surrounds the orange oil will negatively affect oviposition since live yeast are normally consider an attractant for mosquito oviposition.


Assuntos
Aedes , Controle de Mosquitos , Oviposição , Óleos de Plantas , Aedes/fisiologia , Aedes/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Oviposição/efeitos dos fármacos , Feminino , Óleos de Plantas/farmacologia , Controle de Mosquitos/métodos , Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/efeitos dos fármacos , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/fisiologia , Repelentes de Insetos/farmacologia
9.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 220, 2024 May 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741172

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an emerging mosquito-borne Orthoflavivirus that poses a significant public health risk in many temperate and tropical regions in Asia. Since the climate in some endemic countries is similar to temperate climates observed in Europe, understanding the role of specific mosquito species in the transmission of JEV is essential for predicting and effectively controlling the potential for the introduction and establishment of JEV in Europe. METHODS: This study aimed to investigate the vector competence of colonized Culex pipiens biotype molestus mosquitoes for JEV. The mosquitoes were initially collected from the field in southern Sweden. The mosquitoes were offered a blood meal containing the Nakayama strain of JEV (genotype III), and infection rates, dissemination rates, and transmission rates were evaluated at 14, 21, and 28 days post-feeding. RESULTS: The study revealed that colonized Swedish Cx. pipiens are susceptible to JEV infection, with a stable infection rate of around 10% at all timepoints. However, the virus was only detected in the legs of one mosquito at 21 days post-feeding, and no mosquito saliva contained JEV. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this research shows that Swedish Cx. pipiens can become infected with JEV, and emphasizes the importance of further understanding of the thresholds and barriers for JEV dissemination in mosquitoes.


Assuntos
Culex , Vírus da Encefalite Japonesa (Espécie) , Encefalite Japonesa , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Culex/virologia , Culex/fisiologia , Vírus da Encefalite Japonesa (Espécie)/fisiologia , Suécia , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Encefalite Japonesa/transmissão , Encefalite Japonesa/virologia , Feminino , Saliva/virologia , Humanos
10.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 14: 1330475, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38716193

RESUMO

The escalating challenge of malaria control necessitates innovative approaches that extend beyond traditional control strategies. This review explores the incorporation of traditional vector control techniques with emerging Wolbachia-based interventions. Wolbachia, a naturally occurring bacteria, offers a novel approach for combatting vector-borne diseases, including malaria, by reducing the mosquitoes' ability to transmit these diseases. The study explores the rationale for this integration, presenting various case studies and pilot projects that have exhibited significant success. Employing a multi-dimensional approach that includes community mobilization, environmental modifications, and new biological methods, the paper posits that integrated efforts could mark a turning point in the struggle against malaria. Our findings indicate that incorporating Wolbachia-based strategies into existing vector management programs not only is feasible but also heightens the efficacy of malaria control initiatives in different countries especially in Pakistan. The paper concludes that continued research and international collaboration are imperative for translating these promising methods from the laboratory to the field, thereby offering a more sustainable and effective malaria control strategy.


Assuntos
Malária , Mosquitos Vetores , Wolbachia , Malária/prevenção & controle , Animais , Humanos , Mosquitos Vetores/microbiologia , Controle de Mosquitos/métodos , Paquistão
11.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 204, 2024 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38715075

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mosquito-borne viruses cause various infectious diseases in humans and animals. Oya virus (OYAV) and Ebinur Lake virus (EBIV), belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus within the family Peribunyaviridae, are recognized as neglected viruses with the potential to pose threats to animal or public health. The evaluation of vector competence is essential for predicting the arbovirus transmission risk. METHODS: To investigate the range of mosquito vectors for OYAV (strain SZC50) and EBIV (strain Cu20-XJ), the susceptibility of four mosquito species (Culex pipiens pallens, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus, and Ae. aegypti) was measured through artificial oral infection. Then, mosquito species with a high infection rate (IR) were chosen to further evaluate the dissemination rate (DR), transmission rate (TR), and transmission efficiency. The viral RNA in each mosquito sample was determined by RT-qPCR. RESULTS: The results revealed that for OYAV, Cx. pipiens pallens had the highest IR (up to 40.0%) among the four species, but the DR and TR were 4.8% and 0.0%, respectively. For EBIV, Cx. pipiens pallens and Cx. quinquefasciatus had higher IR compared to Ae. albopictus (1.7%). However, the EBIV RNA and infectious virus were detected in Cx. pipiens pallens, with a TR of up to 15.4% and a transmission efficiency of 3.3%. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that Cx. pipiens pallens was susceptible to OYAV but had an extremely low risk of transmitting the virus. Culex pipiens pallens and Cx. quinquefasciatus were susceptible to EBIV, and Cx. pipiens pallens had a higher transmission risk to EBIV than Cx. quinquefasciatus.


Assuntos
Aedes , Culex , Mosquitos Vetores , Orthobunyavirus , Animais , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Aedes/virologia , Culex/virologia , Orthobunyavirus/genética , Orthobunyavirus/classificação , Orthobunyavirus/isolamento & purificação , RNA Viral/genética , Infecções por Bunyaviridae/transmissão , Infecções por Bunyaviridae/virologia
12.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303405, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718006

RESUMO

Entomological research is vital for shaping strategies to control mosquito vectors. Its significance also reaches into environmental management, aiming to prevent inconveniences caused by non-vector mosquitoes like the Mansonia Blanchard, 1901 mosquito. In this study, we carried out a five-year (2019-2023) monitoring of these mosquitoes at ten sites in Porto Velho, Rondônia, using SkeeterVac SV3100 automatic traps positioned between the two hydroelectric complexes on the Madeira River. Throughout this period, we sampled 153,125 mosquitoes, of which the Mansonia genus accounted for 54% of the total, indicating its prevalence in the region. ARIMA analysis revealed seasonal patterns of Mansonia spp., highlighting periods of peak density. Notably, a significant decreasing trend in local abundance was observed from July 2021 (25th epidemiological week) until the end of the study. Wind speed was observed to be the most relevant meteorological factor influencing the abundance of Mansonia spp. especially in the Joana D'Arc settlement, although additional investigation is needed to comprehensively analyze other local events and gain a deeper understanding of the ecological patterns of this genus in the Amazon region.


Assuntos
Culicidae , Estações do Ano , Animais , Culicidae/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia , Brasil , Conceitos Meteorológicos
13.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303330, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718075

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Workers in the construction industry frequently work in construction sites with numerous areas that can potentially accumulate water, such as tanks, wet cement surfaces, or water puddles. These water collection sites become ideal breeding grounds for mosquito infestation, which leads to a higher prevalence of mosquito-borne diseases, especially malaria and dengue among construction workers. Despite that numerous factors have been identified in controlling vector-borne diseases, the specific factors that influence mosquito control at construction sites have yet to be explored. AIMS: This systematic review aims to determine the factors associated with mosquito control among construction workers. METHODS: Primarily, articles related to factors associated with mosquito control among construction workers were collected from two different online databases (ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost). Two independent reviewers were assigned to screen the titles and abstracts of the collected data, stored in Microsoft Excel, against the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Afterwards, the quality of the included articles was critically assessed using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Of the 171 articles identified, 4 were included in the final review. RESULTS: Based on the thorough evaluation, mosquito-related knowledge, practical mosquito prevention measures, and Larval Source Management (LSM) were identified as vital factors associated with mosquito control among construction workers. The significant association between mosquito-related knowledge and control practices indicates higher knowledge linked to effective practices, particularly among female workers and those who were recently infected with malaria. Concurrently, there were notable challenges regarding sustainable preventive measures and larval control methods in construction settings. CONCLUSION: Implementing effective mosquito control, including knowledge and practice on mosquito control together with vector control, is highly required to suppress the expanding mosquito population. It is recommended that employers provide continuous mosquito control education and training to their employees and reward them with incentives, while employees should comply with the guidelines set by their employers to ensure successful mosquito control and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases in the construction industry.


Assuntos
Indústria da Construção , Controle de Mosquitos , Controle de Mosquitos/métodos , Humanos , Animais , Malária/prevenção & controle , Malária/epidemiologia , Culicidae/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
14.
Science ; 384(6696): 697-703, 2024 May 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38723080

RESUMO

Changes in climate shift the geographic locations that are suitable for malaria transmission because of the thermal constraints on vector Anopheles mosquitos and Plasmodium spp. malaria parasites and the lack of availability of surface water for vector breeding. Previous Africa-wide assessments have tended to solely represent surface water using precipitation, ignoring many important hydrological processes. Here, we applied a validated and weighted ensemble of global hydrological and climate models to estimate present and future areas of hydroclimatic suitability for malaria transmission. With explicit surface water representation, we predict a net decrease in areas suitable for malaria transmission from 2025 onward, greater sensitivity to future greenhouse gas emissions, and different, more complex, malaria transmission patterns. Areas of malaria transmission that are projected to change are smaller than those estimated by precipitation-based estimates but are associated with greater changes in transmission season lengths.


Assuntos
Anopheles , Hidrologia , Malária , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Malária/transmissão , África , Anopheles/parasitologia , Mosquitos Vetores/parasitologia , Mudança Climática , Humanos , Estações do Ano , Chuva , Modelos Teóricos , Água , Gases de Efeito Estufa/análise
15.
Microb Ecol ; 87(1): 64, 2024 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38691215

RESUMO

Mosquitoes are a complex nuisance around the world and tropical countries bear the brunt of the burden of mosquito-borne diseases. Rwanda has had success in reducing malaria and some arboviral diseases over the last few years, but still faces challenges to elimination. By building our understanding of in situ mosquito communities in Rwanda at a disturbed, human-occupied site and at a natural, preserved site, we can build our understanding of natural mosquito microbiomes toward the goal of implementing novel microbial control methods. Here, we examined the composition of collected mosquitoes and their microbiomes at two diverse sites using Cytochrome c Oxidase I sequencing and 16S V4 high-throughput sequencing. The majority (36 of 40 species) of mosquitoes captured and characterized in this study are the first-known record of their species for Rwanda but have been characterized in other nations in East Africa. We found significant differences among mosquito genera and among species, but not between mosquito sexes or catch method. Bacteria of interest for arbovirus control, Asaia, Serratia, and Wolbachia, were found in abundance at both sites and varied greatly by species.


Assuntos
Bactérias , Culicidae , Microbiota , Wolbachia , Ruanda , Animais , Culicidae/microbiologia , Wolbachia/genética , Wolbachia/isolamento & purificação , Wolbachia/classificação , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Mosquitos Vetores/microbiologia , Feminino , Masculino , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Serratia/genética , Serratia/isolamento & purificação , Serratia/classificação , Complexo IV da Cadeia de Transporte de Elétrons/genética , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala
16.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10003, 2024 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38693192

RESUMO

Zika, a viral disease transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes, emerged in the Americas in 2015, causing large-scale epidemics. Colombia alone reported over 72,000 Zika cases between 2015 and 2016. Using national surveillance data from 1121 municipalities over 70 weeks, we identified sociodemographic and environmental factors associated with Zika's emergence, re-emergence, persistence, and transmission intensity in Colombia. We fitted a zero-state Markov-switching model under the Bayesian framework, assuming Zika switched between periods of presence and absence according to spatially and temporally varying probabilities of emergence/re-emergence (from absence to presence) and persistence (from presence to presence). These probabilities were assumed to follow a series of mixed multiple logistic regressions. When Zika was present, assuming that the cases follow a negative binomial distribution, we estimated the transmission intensity rate. Our results indicate that Zika emerged/re-emerged sooner and that transmission was intensified in municipalities that were more densely populated, at lower altitudes and/or with less vegetation cover. Warmer temperatures and less weekly-accumulated rain were also associated with Zika emergence. Zika cases persisted for longer in more densely populated areas with more cases reported in the previous week. Overall, population density, elevation, and temperature were identified as the main contributors to the first Zika epidemic in Colombia. We also estimated the probability of Zika presence by municipality and week, and the results suggest that the disease circulated undetected by the surveillance system on many occasions. Our results offer insights into priority areas for public health interventions against emerging and re-emerging Aedes-borne diseases.


Assuntos
Aedes , Cadeias de Markov , Infecção por Zika virus , Zika virus , Infecção por Zika virus/transmissão , Infecção por Zika virus/epidemiologia , Colômbia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Animais , Aedes/virologia , Teorema de Bayes , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Surtos de Doenças
17.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 200, 2024 May 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38704595

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging alphavirus, primarily transmitted by the mosquito Haemagogus janthinomys in Central and South America. However, recent studies have shown that Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and various Anopheles mosquitoes can also transmit the virus under laboratory conditions. MAYV causes sporadic outbreaks across the South American region, particularly in areas near forests. Recently, cases have been reported in European and North American travelers returning from endemic areas, raising concerns about potential introductions into new regions. This study aims to assess the vector competence of three potential vectors for MAYV present in Europe. METHODS: Aedes albopictus from Italy, Anopheles atroparvus from Spain and Culex pipiens biotype molestus from Belgium were exposed to MAYV and maintained under controlled environmental conditions. Saliva was collected through a salivation assay at 7 and 14 days post-infection (dpi), followed by vector dissection. Viral titers were determined using focus forming assays, and infection rates, dissemination rates, and transmission efficiency were calculated. RESULTS: Results indicate that Ae. albopictus and An. atroparvus from Italy and Spain, respectively, are competent vectors for MAYV, with transmission possible starting from 7 dpi under laboratory conditions. In contrast, Cx. pipiens bioform molestus was unable to support MAYV infection, indicating its inability to contribute to the transmission cycle. CONCLUSIONS: In the event of accidental MAYV introduction in European territories, autochthonous outbreaks could potentially be sustained by two European species: Ae. albopictus and An. atroparvus. Entomological surveillance should also consider certain Anopheles species when monitoring MAYV transmission.


Assuntos
Aedes , Infecções por Alphavirus , Alphavirus , Culex , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Aedes/virologia , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , Alphavirus/fisiologia , Alphavirus/isolamento & purificação , Culex/virologia , Europa (Continente) , Infecções por Alphavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Alphavirus/virologia , Saliva/virologia , Anopheles/virologia , Espanha , Itália , Feminino , Bélgica
18.
Parasit Vectors ; 17(1): 216, 2024 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734639

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mosquitoes pose a risk to human health worldwide, and correct species identification and detection of cryptic species are the most important keys for surveillance and control of mosquito vectors. In addition to traditional identification based on morphology, DNA barcoding has recently been widely used as a complementary tool for reliable identification of mosquito species. The main objective of this study was to create a reference DNA barcode library for the Croatian mosquito fauna, which should contribute to more accurate and faster identification of species, including cryptic species, and recognition of relevant vector species. METHODS: Sampling was carried out in three biogeographical regions of Croatia over six years (2017-2022). The mosquitoes were morphologically identified; molecular identification was based on the standard barcoding region of the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear ITS2 region, the latter to identify species within the Anopheles maculipennis complex. The BIN-RESL algorithm assigned the COI sequences to the corresponding BINs (Barcode Index Number clusters) in BOLD, i.e. to putative MOTUs (Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units). The bPTP and ASAP species delimitation methods were applied to the genus datasets in order to verify/confirm the assignment of specimens to specific MOTUs. RESULTS: A total of 405 mosquito specimens belonging to six genera and 30 morphospecies were collected and processed. Species delimitation methods assigned the samples to 31 (BIN-RESL), 30 (bPTP) and 28 (ASAP) MOTUs, with most delimited MOTUs matching the morphological identification. Some species of the genera Culex, Aedes and Anopheles were assigned to the same MOTUs, especially species that are difficult to distinguish morphologically and/or represent species complexes. In total, COI barcode sequences for 34 mosquito species and ITS2 sequences for three species of the genus Anopheles were added to the mosquito sequence database for Croatia, including one individual from the Intrudens Group, which represents a new record for the Croatian mosquito fauna. CONCLUSION: We present the results of the first comprehensive study combining morphological and molecular identification of most mosquito species present in Croatia, including several invasive and vector species. With the exception of some closely related species, this study confirmed that DNA barcoding based on COI provides a reliable basis for the identification of mosquito species in Croatia.


Assuntos
Culicidae , Código de Barras de DNA Taxonômico , Complexo IV da Cadeia de Transporte de Elétrons , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Croácia , Mosquitos Vetores/genética , Mosquitos Vetores/classificação , Mosquitos Vetores/anatomia & histologia , Culicidae/classificação , Culicidae/genética , Complexo IV da Cadeia de Transporte de Elétrons/genética , Anopheles/genética , Anopheles/classificação , Filogenia , Biblioteca Gênica
19.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10814, 2024 05 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734695

RESUMO

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) poses a significant global health threat, re-emerging as a mosquito-transmitted pathogen that caused high fever, rash, and severe arthralgia. In Thailand, a notable CHIKV outbreak in 2019-2020 affected approximately 20,000 cases across 60 provinces, underscoring the need for effective mosquito control protocols. Previous studies have highlighted the role of midgut bacteria in the interaction between mosquito vectors and pathogen infections, demonstrating their ability to protect the insect from invading pathogens. However, research on the midgut bacteria of Aedes (Ae.) aegypti, the primary vector for CHIKV in Thailand remains limited. This study aims to characterize the bacterial communities in laboratory strains of Ae. aegypti, both infected and non-infected with CHIKV. Female mosquitoes from a laboratory strain of Ae. aegypti were exposed to a CHIKV-infected blood meal through membrane feeding, while the control group received a non-infected blood meal. At 7 days post-infection (dpi), mosquito midguts were dissected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify midgut bacteria, and CHIKV presence was confirmed by E1-nested RT-PCR using mosquito carcasses. The study aimed to compare the bacterial communities between CHIKV-infected and non-infected groups. The analysis included 12 midgut bacterial samples, divided into three groups: CHIKV-infected (exposed and infected), non-infected (exposed but not infected), and non-exposed (negative control). Alpha diversity indices and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity matrix revealed significant differences in bacterial profiles among the three groups. The infected group exhibited an increased abundance of bacteria genus Gluconobacter, while Asaia was prevalent in both non-infected and negative control groups. Chryseobacterium was prominent in the negative control group. These findings highlight potential alterations in the distribution and abundance of gut microbiomes in response to CHIKV infection status. This study provides valuable insights into the dynamic relationship between midgut bacteria and CHIKV, underscoring the potential for alterations in bacterial composition depending on infection status. Understanding the relationships between mosquitoes and their microbiota holds promise for developing new methods and tools to enhance existing strategies for disease prevention and control. This research advances our understanding of the circulating bacterial composition, opening possibilities for new approaches in combating mosquito-borne diseases.


Assuntos
Aedes , Vírus Chikungunya , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Mosquitos Vetores , Animais , Feminino , Aedes/microbiologia , Aedes/virologia , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Febre de Chikungunya/transmissão , Febre de Chikungunya/virologia , Vírus Chikungunya/genética , Vírus Chikungunya/isolamento & purificação , Vírus Chikungunya/fisiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/microbiologia , Mosquitos Vetores/virologia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Tailândia
20.
Sci Data ; 11(1): 471, 2024 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724521

RESUMO

We present a de novo transcriptome of the mosquito vector Culex pipiens, assembled by sequences of susceptible and insecticide resistant larvae. The high quality of the assembly was confirmed by TransRate and BUSCO. A mapping percentage until 94.8% was obtained by aligning contigs to Nr, SwissProt, and TrEMBL, with 27,281 sequences that simultaneously mapped on the three databases. A total of 14,966 ORFs were also functionally annotated by using the eggNOG database. Among them, we identified ORF sequences of the main gene families involved in insecticide resistance. Therefore, this resource stands as a valuable reference for further studies of differential gene expression as well as to identify genes of interest for genetic-based control tools.


Assuntos
Culex , Resistência a Inseticidas , Larva , Transcriptoma , Animais , Culex/genética , Larva/genética , Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Resistência a Inseticidas/genética , Mosquitos Vetores/genética , Fases de Leitura Aberta
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...