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2.
BMC Oral Health ; 20(1): 275, 2020 10 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33032593

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Among several potential transmission sources in the spreading of the COVID-19, dental services have received a high volume of attention. Several reports, papers, guidelines, and suggestions have been released on how this infection could be transmitted through dental services and what should be done. This study aimed to review the guidelines in order to develop a practical feasibility protocol for the re-opening of dental clinics and the reorientation of dental services. METHODS: This study systematically reviewed the published literature and the guidelines of international health care institutions on dentistry and COVID-19. We searched Pubmed, Web of Science, and SCOPUS electronic databases using MESH terms. The recommendations identified were tested with a convenience sample of experienced practitioners, and a practical step-by-step protocol is presented in this paper. RESULTS: To the date this paper was drafted, 38 articles were found, of which 9 satisfied our inclusion criteria. As all the nine studies were proposed in a general consensus, any elective non-emergency dental care for patients with suspected or known COVID-19 should be postponed for at least 2 weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic. Only urgent treatment of dental diseases can be performed during the COVID-19 outbreak taking into consideration pharmacological management as the first line and contagion-reduced minimally invasive emergency treatment as the secondary and final management. CONCLUSIONS: While the currently available evidence has not demonstrated a clear and direct relationship between dental treatment or surgery and the possibility of the transmission of COVID-19, there is clearly the potential for transmission. Therefore, following the protective protocols in the COVID-19 crisis is of utmost importance in a dental setting.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Odontologia/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto
3.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 10: CD013686, 2020 10 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33047816

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many dental procedures produce aerosols (droplets, droplet nuclei and splatter) that harbour various pathogenic micro-organisms and may pose a risk for the spread of infections between dentist and patient. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to greater concern about this risk. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of methods used during dental treatment procedures to minimize aerosol production and reduce or neutralize contamination in aerosols. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases on 17 September 2020: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (in the Cochrane Library, 2020, Issue 8), MEDLINE Ovid (from 1946); Embase Ovid (from 1980); the WHO COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease; the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov); and the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) on aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs) performed by dental healthcare providers that evaluated methods to reduce contaminated aerosols in dental clinics (excluding preprocedural mouthrinses). The primary outcomes were incidence of infection in dental staff or patients, and reduction in volume and level of contaminated aerosols in the operative environment. The secondary outcomes were cost, accessibility and feasibility. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors screened search results, extracted data from the included studies, assessed the risk of bias in the studies, and judged the certainty of the available evidence. We used mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect estimate for continuous outcomes, and random-effects meta-analysis to combine data. We assessed heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: We included 16 studies with 425 participants aged 5 to 69 years. Eight studies had high risk of bias; eight had unclear risk of bias. No studies measured infection. All studies measured bacterial contamination using the surrogate outcome of colony-forming units (CFU). Two studies measured contamination per volume of air sampled at different distances from the patient's mouth, and 14 studies sampled particles on agar plates at specific distances from the patient's mouth. The results presented below should be interpreted with caution as the evidence is very low certainty due to heterogeneity, risk of bias, small sample sizes and wide confidence intervals. Moreover, we do not know the 'minimal clinically important difference' in CFU. High-volume evacuator Use of a high-volume evacuator (HVE) may reduce bacterial contamination in aerosols less than one foot (~ 30 cm) from a patient's mouth (MD -47.41, 95% CI -92.76 to -2.06; 3 RCTs, 122 participants (two studies had split-mouth design); very high heterogeneity I² = 95%), but not at longer distances (MD -1.00, -2.56 to 0.56; 1 RCT, 80 participants). One split-mouth RCT (six participants) found that HVE may not be more effective than conventional dental suction (saliva ejector or low-volume evacuator) at 40 cm (MD CFU -2.30, 95% CI -5.32 to 0.72) or 150 cm (MD -2.20, 95% CI -14.01 to 9.61). Dental isolation combination system One RCT (50 participants) found that there may be no difference in CFU between a combination system (Isolite) and a saliva ejector (low-volume evacuator) during AGPs (MD -0.31, 95% CI -0.82 to 0.20) or after AGPs (MD -0.35, -0.99 to 0.29). However, an 'n of 1' design study showed that the combination system may reduce CFU compared with rubber dam plus HVE (MD -125.20, 95% CI -174.02 to -76.38) or HVE (MD -109.30, 95% CI -153.01 to -65.59). Rubber dam One split-mouth RCT (10 participants) receiving dental treatment, found that there may be a reduction in CFU with rubber dam at one-metre (MD -16.20, 95% CI -19.36 to -13.04) and two-metre distance (MD -11.70, 95% CI -15.82 to -7.58). One RCT of 47 dental students found use of rubber dam may make no difference in CFU at the forehead (MD 0.98, 95% CI -0.73 to 2.70) and occipital region of the operator (MD 0.77, 95% CI -0.46 to 2.00). One split-mouth RCT (21 participants) found that rubber dam plus HVE may reduce CFU more than cotton roll plus HVE on the patient's chest (MD -251.00, 95% CI -267.95 to -234.05) and dental unit light (MD -12.70, 95% CI -12.85 to -12.55). Air cleaning systems One split-mouth CCT (two participants) used a local stand-alone air cleaning system (ACS), which may reduce aerosol contamination during cavity preparation (MD -66.70 CFU, 95% CI -120.15 to -13.25 per cubic metre) or ultrasonic scaling (MD -32.40, 95% CI - 51.55 to -13.25). Another CCT (50 participants) found that laminar flow in the dental clinic combined with a HEPA filter may reduce contamination approximately 76 cm from the floor (MD -483.56 CFU, 95% CI -550.02 to -417.10 per cubic feet per minute per patient) and 20 cm to 30 cm from the patient's mouth (MD -319.14 CFU, 95% CI - 385.60 to -252.68). Disinfectants ‒ antimicrobial coolants Two RCTs evaluated use of antimicrobial coolants during ultrasonic scaling. Compared with distilled water, coolant containing chlorhexidine (CHX), cinnamon extract coolant or povidone iodine may reduce CFU: CHX (MD -124.00, 95% CI -135.78 to -112.22; 20 participants), povidone iodine (MD -656.45, 95% CI -672.74 to -640.16; 40 participants), cinnamon (MD -644.55, 95% CI -668.70 to -620.40; 40 participants). CHX coolant may reduce CFU more than povidone iodine (MD -59.30, 95% CI -64.16 to -54.44; 20 participants), but not more than cinnamon extract (MD -11.90, 95% CI -35.88 to 12.08; 40 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found no studies that evaluated disease transmission via aerosols in a dental setting; and no evidence about viral contamination in aerosols. All of the included studies measured bacterial contamination using colony-forming units. There appeared to be some benefit from the interventions evaluated but the available evidence is very low certainty so we are unable to draw reliable conclusions. We did not find any studies on methods such as ventilation, ionization, ozonisation, UV light and fogging. Studies are needed that measure contamination in aerosols, size distribution of aerosols and infection transmission risk for respiratory diseases such as COVID-19 in dental patients and staff.


Assuntos
Microbiologia do Ar , Infecções Bacterianas/prevenção & controle , Controle de Infecções Dentárias/métodos , Doenças Profissionais/prevenção & controle , Viroses/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Adulto , Aerossóis , Idoso , Filtros de Ar , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Contagem de Colônia Microbiana/métodos , Odontologia , Desinfetantes , Humanos , Controle de Infecções Dentárias/economia , Controle de Infecções Dentárias/instrumentação , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Diques de Borracha , Sucção , Adulto Jovem
4.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 58(229): 677-680, 2020 Sep 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33068090

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: There is a global crisis which has been led by COVID-19. The patients undergoingdental procedures and dental professionals are at higher risk of contracting this disease owing toaerosols generated and a lot of face to face contact during the procedures. The aim of this study was to know the perceptions of dental students of COMS-TH regarding future of dentistry in Nepal amidCOVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The present cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at COMS-TH, Bharatpur by sending an online e-survey questionnaire to 146 dental students out of which 99 responded. The e-survey questionnaire consisted of three parts which consisted of questions about demographics, knowledge about COVID-19 and their perceptions about future of dentistry. RESULTS: The results of the study depicted that most of the students thought dentistry is good and noble profession and will recommend it to young medical aspirants. Most of them wanted to pursue post graduation courses in future giving preference to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The study concluded that most of the dental students were satisfied with dentistry as their profession and wanted National Dental Association to fix the minimum charges of each dental procedure. Also there is a need to start more post graduation courses in existing institutions providing dental education as most of the students want to pursue it in future.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Infecções por Coronavirus , Odontologia/tendências , Economia em Odontologia/tendências , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Estudantes de Odontologia , Betacoronavirus , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Previsões , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde/tendências , Humanos , Controle de Infecções Dentárias , Masculino , Nepal , Padrões de Prática Odontológica/tendências , Cirurgia Bucal , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(18): 9739-9743, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33015819

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Remdesivir is a nucleotide analogue prodrug that inhibits viral RNA polymerases. It has been recognized recently as a promising antiviral drug against a wide array of RNA viruses (including SARS/MERS-CoV5). We aimed at determining which drugs used in dentistry interact with Remdesivir in order to avoid adverse reactions that may worsen the condition of patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A literature review was conducted to identify potential drug interactions between remdesivir (used in the treatment of COVID-19) and drugs prescribed in dentistry. The search was made in the databases PubMed and MEDLINE and official websites using key terms remdesivir, drug interactions and dentistry for articles published up to 31st July 2020. RESULTS: According to the articles reviewed, a total of 279 drugs interact with Remdesivir. Two major interactions have been reported, 277 moderate drug interactions, and one with alcohol/food. The drug interactions involving drugs prescribed in dentistry are all moderate drug interactions and are (according to drug group): (1) antibiotics: azithromycin, clavulanate, doxycycline, erythromycin, levofloxacin; (2) antifungals: clotrimazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole; (3) non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NAIDS): celecoxib diclofenac, etodolac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, ketorolac, mefenamic acid, naproxen, piroxicam. CONCLUSIONS: It is clinically necessary for oral health professionals to be aware of possible drug interactions that may occur between remdesivir and drugs commonly prescribed in dentistry in order to prevent adverse reactions that may even endanger the life of a patient with COVID-19.


Assuntos
Monofosfato de Adenosina/análogos & derivados , Alanina/análogos & derivados , Infecções por Coronavirus , Odontologia , Interações Medicamentosas , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Monofosfato de Adenosina/efeitos adversos , Monofosfato de Adenosina/uso terapêutico , Alanina/efeitos adversos , Alanina/uso terapêutico , Antivirais/efeitos adversos , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico
7.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 21(7): 718-722, 2020 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33020352

RESUMO

AIM: The present study was conducted to assess the perceived risk of COVID-19 transmission in dental professionals (DPs), that include dentists and dental auxiliary staffs, and whether rapid tests should be a recommended tool to constrain the transmission of the COVID-19, and who should be bearing their cost (governments, dentists, or patients) through an online survey. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample size of n = 700 was recruited in the study. The study included DPs from all over the world. A randomized selection of samples was done through dental groups present on social networks. An online survey was conducted in April 2020, using the Google Form software to provide questions and collect and elaborate answers. Data were analyzed using the statistical software STATA and presented in terms of percentages. RESULTS: About 78% of the study participants perceived a very high risk of COVID-19 contamination in dental settings. Nearly 80% of the study participants were willing to be subjected to rapid tests and the same could be performed on patients visiting their dental clinics, which could prevent the spread of the disease. About 55% of the participants had reported that additional costs for the rapid tests should be borne by the governments. CONCLUSION: The results of the present survey report that DPs do not feel safe and perceive a high risk of COVID-19 contagion and prevention of the disease could be done by performing rapid tests on dentists, dental staff, and patients visiting the dental clinics irrespective of age and gender of the participants. SIGNIFICANCE: Since all the dentists and allied staff have perceived increased risk for COVID-19 transmission, it is important that preventive measures are implemented through rapid test kits at the earliest.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Infecções por Coronavirus , Odontólogos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Odontologia , Humanos , Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 28: e20200358, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32997092

RESUMO

The rapid and abrupt transmission pattern of the SARS-CoV-2 unleashed the current COVID-19 pandemic, as recognized by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Considering the high risk of transmission of the virus in dental environments and the specificities in clinical practice, COVID-19 posed immediate challenges for dental care and education. Due to the need to establish infection prevention and control guidance in dental health settings to enable a safe clinical practice, this review aims to list the challenges and perspectives in managing dental care in services and schools. This review employed materials collected from PubMed and the main guidelines and studies on the novel coronavirus to provide an overview of the clinical procedures and decisions made by health care personnel in dental offices and dental schools. We expect the COVID-19 scenario to promote significant changes in clinical practice and dental education; dentists should seek specific and particular regulations for dental practice established by their state or country. Biosafety checklists are strongly recommended for appointments at dental services and face-to-face activities in dental schools.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Assistência Odontológica/organização & administração , Odontologia/organização & administração , Educação em Odontologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
10.
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants ; 35(5): 900-909, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991639

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Citation-based metrics, such as the H-classics method, have been used as an indicator to assess academic performance in the scientific community. However, information addressing issues regarding self-citation, citation half-life, and subject area of origin in implant dentistry is lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the citation characteristics of H-classics articles in implant dentistry throughout different time periods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: H-classics implant dentistry articles were searched and selected by applying the H-classics method from the Scopus database. Bibliometric analysis was conducted to evaluate the citation characteristics, including institutional and journal self-citation, citation half-life, and subject area of origin of identified H-classics articles. RESULTS: The International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants and Clinical Oral Implants Research are the leading journals contributing the majority of citations to the retrieved H-classics articles. Articles published in the United States cited the most H-classics articles. Journal self-citation was 12.41% on average, while institutional self-citation was approximately 7.81%. Citation half-life decreased significantly across time periods, with an average decreasing ratio of 43.95%. Research on Scope III, bioengineering interventions, had the most prominent distribution citation frequency in the subject area "Others." CONCLUSION: This study provides insightful views regarding citation characteristics of H-classics articles in implant dentistry (eg, interdisciplinary publications on bioengineering interventions) during the investigation periods, which may foster the translation of preclinical research into clinical applications in the future.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Odontologia , Estados Unidos
11.
Swiss Dent J ; 130(9): 707-709, 2020 09 07.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940027

RESUMO

These guidelines concern the administration of systemic antibiotics in reconstructive dentistry. While the general guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis apply to patients at risk, the prophylactic administration of antibiotics is only indicated in very rare cases in healthy patients: chamber-preserving measures with autologous grafts during extractions in the hygiene phase and implantation with controlled bone regeneration in the surgical phase.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Antibioticoprofilaxia , Odontologia , Humanos
12.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 121(10): 712-716, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32955902

RESUMO

Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being. The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the area of Wuhan, China, has evolved rapidly into a public health crisis and has spread exponentially to other parts of the world.There is strong evidence that this novel coronavirus is similar to coronavirus species found in bats and potentially pangolins, confirming the zoonotic nature of this new cross-species virus-mediated disease.Dentists provide support and management for patients. They proceed in accordance with the current guidelines of the government of each country as well as with the valid standards and preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for COVID-19.This article mainly focuses on the recommended methods in dental medicine designed to protect patients and healthcare professionals (Tab. 2, Ref. 29). Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, dental strategies, dental treatment recommendations.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Odontologia/métodos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus , Humanos
13.
Georgian Med News ; (304-305): 158-163, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32965268

RESUMO

Ergonimics is the science of labor. The subject of its research is the interrelationship between human, technology and the environment in the labor process. The development of ergonomics is closely related to the level of socio-economic development of the Country. The principles of ergonomics are becoming increasingly important in managing all areas of medicine. Since dentistry is one of the fastest growing areas of medicine in terms of technology, it is important to constantly monitor the requirements of ergonomics in order to ensure technological progress with adequate labor recommendations that will help specialists adapt to innovations and thus improve the quality of service.; In dentistry the effectiveness of the labor process is determined by the qualification of the workers, the specifics of working conditions and the adaptations of the personal to this conditions. The development of the correct recommendations on this issue is one of the most important tasks of ergonomics, however, the practical implementation of such recommendations is somewhat problematic. The presented review discusses the conditions for introducing ergonomic principles and risk factors that cause the incomplete implementation of these principles. The review is based on the articles published over the past 5 years in journals indexed in the Science Direct, Scopus, and PubMed databases. The analysis of the collected information revealed the necessity of:; - studying of the patterns of interaction between human, equipment (technology) and environmental factors in order to improve the activities of service providers;; - ergonomic assessment of working conditions and dynamic detection of "occupational harmful factors" to create an ergonomic environment reflecting the changes of the socio-economic conditions in the Country;; - development of the theoretical bases of the functioning of the "human-operator", taking into account the operating conditions of technological systems and the peculiarities of environmental factors;; - development of ergonomic prognoses and hypotheses for the development and improvement of the human labor process.


Assuntos
Odontologia , Ergonomia , Humanos , Fatores de Risco
14.
J Endod ; 46(9S): S175-S188, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32950189

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Regenerative medicine offers innovative approaches to restore damaged tissues on the basis of tissue engineering (TE). Although research on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) has been very active in recent years, the number of licensed products remains surprisingly low and restricted to the treatment of severe, incurable diseases. METHODS: This paper provides a critical review of current literature on the regulatory, clinical, and commercial status of ATMP-based therapies in the EU and worldwide and the hurdles to overcome for their broader application in Regenerative Dentistry. RESULTS: Competent authorities have focused on developing regulatory pathways to address unmet patient needs. Oncology represents the dominating field, followed by cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurodegenerative, immunologic, and inherited diseases. Yet, the status remains in early development, and scientific, regulatory, and cost-effectiveness issues impose considerable hurdles toward marketing authorization, technology adoption, and patient accessibility. In this context, although regenerative dentistry has achieved breakthrough innovations in TE of several dental/oral tissues in preclinical models, it has hardly harnessed research progress to integrate innovative regenerative treatments into clinical practice. CONCLUSION: Global demographic changes, which demonstrate a steady increase of the aging population, highlight the societal need for the application of ATMP-based therapies in the treatment of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Although oral diseases, as an integral part of NCDs, are not life-threatening and largely preventable, they sustain high prevalence, with severe burden on economy and quality of life. In this perspective, the urgent request to ultimately translate draining research in dental TE conducted during the last decades into innovative treatments brought safely and cost-effectively into society at large still holds the stage. This review provides an overview of the regulatory, clinical, and commercial status of ATMP-based therapies in the European Union and worldwide and the hurdles to overcome for their broader application in regenerative dentistry.


Assuntos
Qualidade de Vida , Medicina Regenerativa , Idoso , Terapia Baseada em Transplante de Células e Tecidos , Odontologia , Humanos , Engenharia Tecidual
15.
Prim Dent J ; 9(3): 59-63, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940592

RESUMO

With a growing ageing population and increased life expectancy in the UK, oral healthcare professionals will be exposed to a greater number of patients with health conditions which may affect cognitive function, communication and capacity to consent to treatment. This often gives rise to a conundrum which clinicians may face when considering capacity, consent and the legal implications and frameworks surrounding this. Assessing patient capacity is encountered routinely in dental practice and so oral healthcare professionals should be well informed of their responsibilities in this context. This article summarises and introduces readers to key concepts regarding consent and capacity with reference to relevant cross-jurisdictional legislation.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido , Tomada de Decisões , Odontologia , Humanos
16.
Braz Dent J ; 31(4): 392-398, 2020 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32901715

RESUMO

This study aimed to analyze the videos available on YouTube related to dentistry and the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), as there is no such analysis in the existing literature. The terms "dental" and "COVID-19" were searched on YouTube on May 9, 2020. The top 116 English-language videos with at least 300 views were analyzed by two observers. Data was saved for each video, including target audience, source, country of origin, content, number of views, time watched, average views, duration, like/dislike ratio, and usefulness. Total video information and quality index (VIQI) scores were calculated, consisting of flow, information, accuracy, quality, and precision indices. Non-parametric tests were used for analysis. The analyzed videos were viewed 375,000 times and totaled 20 h of content. Most videos were uploaded by dentists (45.7%), originated from the United States (79.3%), and contained information targeted towards patients (48.3%). Nearly half of the videos (47.4%) were moderately useful. For the usefulness of the videos, statistically significant differences were found for all indices as well as total VIQI scores. A comparison of the indices according to the relevance of the videos showed statistically significant differences in the videos' information and precision indices and total VIQI scores. The results of this study showed that dentistry YouTube videos related to COVID-19 had high view numbers; however, the videos were generally moderate in quality and usefulness.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Mídias Sociais , Betacoronavirus , Odontologia , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Gravação em Vídeo
17.
Braz Oral Res ; 34: e114, 2020 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32901729

RESUMO

The aim of the present infodemiological study was to evaluate whether the COVID-19 outbreak has influenced the volume of content related to the dental treatment needs of Brazilian Twitter users to summarize the trends, and to identify the perceptions of the treatment needed. We collected tweets related to dental care needs of individuals exposed to the COVID-19 outbreak scenario between March 23 to May 4, 2020 and of those not exposed to the COVID-19 pandemic (unexposed group) on the same reported days of 2019 using the terms "dentista (dentist), dente (tooth), siso (third molar), and aparelho (orthodontic appliance)." Descriptive analysis was performed to provide summary statistics of the frequencies of tweets related to different dental treatment needs and also the differences in volume content between the years 2019 and 2020. Moreover, the data were analyzed by qualitative analysis using an inductive approach. A total of 1,763 tweets from 2020 and 1,339 tweets from 2019 were screened. Those tweets posted by non-Brazilian users, duplicates, and those unrelated to dental treatment needs were removed and, therefore 1,197 tweets from 2020 and 719 tweets from 2019 were selected. Content volume related to dental treatment needs greatly increased during the COVID-19 outbreak. Findings from the word cloud and content analysis suggest that dental pain, related or not to the third molar, and problems with orthodontic appliances were the topics most commonly related to dental treatment needs discussed during the COVID-19 outbreak, mainly conveying anxiety and distress. The volume of tweets related to dental treatment needs posted by Brazilian users increased during the COVID-19 outbreak and self-reported pain and urgencies were the most popular topics.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Brasil , Humanos , Pandemias , Autorrelato , Mídias Sociais
18.
Compend Contin Educ Dent ; 41(8): 420-424; quiz 425, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32870698

RESUMO

In early 2020, a new health threat arose with symptoms and mode of transmission comparable to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Both SARS and the new disease, COVID-19, are caused by coronaviruses and share similar characteristics, especially their severity and high mortality rates and an apparently greater likelihood of transmission. Seasonal influenza is caused by numerous and changing groups of viruses and, for most people, is much less serious. The purpose of this article is to help clinicians compare seasonal influenza, SARS, and COVID-19. It discusses what constitutes best evidence in a time of pandemic, describing the hierarchy of evidence. It is intended to assist dental professionals in providing accurate, current information in answer to patients' questions regarding testing and treatment.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Odontologia , Humanos
20.
J Occup Health ; 62(1): e12168, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32951286

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the oral healthcare workers' concerns, perceived impact, and preparedness in COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was carried out at 10 different dental hospitals in Pakistan from March to June 2020. A 35 items valid and reliable questionnaire was used to assess the concerns, perceived impact, and preparedness of oral healthcare workers (OHCW) in COVID-19 pandemic. Chi-squared test and logistic regression were used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 583 OHCW participated in this study. The odds of having the awareness about the risk of exposure and fear of getting infected, were greater in the clinical than non-clinical OHCW (OR: 52.6; OR: 15.9). For social network concerns, the clinical OHCW were more likely to be concerned about their colleagues (OR: 6.0). The clinical OHCW have greater odds of worrying about telling the family/friends about the risk exposed to (OR: 2.55), being avoided because of the job (OR: 3.20) and more likely to be feeling stressed (OR: 4.31). Less than 50% of the participants felt that their institutions are well prepared and only 12.6% had attended an infection control training session. Most participants practiced self-preparation such as buying masks and disinfection (94.3%, 98.3%). CONCLUSION: The majority of OHCW felt concerned about their risk of exposure to infection and falling ill from exposure and infecting friends/family. There is a need for training of infection control and PPE and minimizing fear and psychological impact on OHCW should be the priority in any preparedness and planning for combating COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Odontologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Paquistão , Pandemias , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
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