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1.
Compend Contin Educ Dent ; 45(4): 214, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38622082

RESUMO

Hypoplastic maxilla is a common skeletal anomaly that compromises function and esthetics. Beyond just a narrow-appearing smile, this abnormality presents significant restorative challenges in adult patients as it is often associated with crowding, compromised axial inclination of the teeth, lack of alveolar bone support, root proximity, and occlusal trauma.1 Recent research also confirms association of maxillary deficiency with nasal stenosis and a predisposition to compromised nasal airflow and pharyngeal collapse during sleep.2,3 Maxillary transverse skeletal deficiency is often but not always associated with posterior dental cross-bite. In most cases, maxillary posterior teeth are flared buccally and mandibular posterior teeth are excessively lingually inclined masking the underlying skeletal problem.4 Advances in 3D imaging in dentistry, namely ultra-low radiation cone-beam imaging technology, have significantly enhanced clinicians' ability to diagnose and subsequently treat a maxillary transverse deficiency.5.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão , Aparelhos Ortodônticos Removíveis , Ortodontia , Dente , Adulto , Humanos , Estética Dentária , Má Oclusão/terapia , Maxila , Técnica de Expansão Palatina , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico/métodos
2.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 292, 2024 Mar 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38431544

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients experiencing any malocclusion, may desire for treatment. However, there is no scientific information orthodontic treatment demand and the knowledge of young adults about orthodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to assess orthodontic treatment demand in young adults from Poland and Chile, their previous orthodontic experience and their knowledge on fixed and aligner orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The target group comprised people aged 18-30. The sample size was estimated as above 400 for each country. The survey was carried out in Polish and Spanish within 3 months and consisted of 25 questions delivered via social media. Comparisons were made between countries, age subgroups and gender. RESULTS: The response rate was 1,99%, what stands for 1092 responses, 670 from Chile and 422 from Poland, respectively. The percentage of young adults who were already treated was 42,9% in Poland and 25,0% in Chile. The ones planning to have orthodontic treatment within a year counted for 11,8% in Poland and 5,3% in Chile. Most young adults who want to be treated (20,6%) rely on doctor's recommendation on type of appliance while 14,7% of all respondents are interested solely in aligners. Most respondents have heard about aligners (58%). Direct provider-to-customer service without a doctor is not acceptable, neither in Poland (85,1%) nor in Chile (64,8%). Most young adults provided incorrect answers referring various aspects of aligner treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In both countries, patients demand to be treated and monitored by the orthodontist. A high percentage of patients want to be treated exclusively with aligners. Direct-to-consumer orthodontics does not seem attractive to patients. Young adults do not have adequate knowledge referring to aligner treatment. Many people want to be treated despite a previous orthodontic treatment.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão , Aparelhos Ortodônticos Removíveis , Ortodontia , Humanos , Adulto Jovem , Má Oclusão/terapia , Europa (Continente) , Chile , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
Br Dent J ; 236(5): 401-405, 2024 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38459321

RESUMO

The aim of this paper is to introduce the general dentist to recent advances in 3D printing technology used in orthodontics. 3D printing is a highly evolving area of dentistry with continual developments. New advances now allow the in-house delivery of printed aligners. Advocates of this new technology suggest the benefits of more prescriptive and controlled tooth movement in comparison to conventional thermoformed appliances. However, there is currently limited evidence on the efficiency of this material and more research needs to be carried out to validate this new technology.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Impressão Tridimensional , Humanos , Previsões , Técnicas de Movimentação Dentária , Assistência Odontológica
6.
J Orthod ; 51(1): 89-92, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38456265

Assuntos
Ortodontia , Humanos
8.
Head Face Med ; 20(1): 17, 2024 Mar 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38459597

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Esthetics plays a crucial role in orthodontics and many other dental and medical fields. To date, no study has assessed the combined effects of the 3 facial features 'facial height, gingival display (GD), and buccal corridor size (BC)' on facial/smile beauty. Therefore, this study was conducted for the first time. METHODS: In this psychometric diagnostic study, beauty of 27 randomized perceptometric images of a female model with variations in facial heights (short, normal, long), gingival displays (0, 2, 4, 6 mm), and buccal corridor sizes (2%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%) were evaluated by 108 judges (36 orthodontists, 36 dentists, 36 laypeople) using a 5-scale Likert scale (1 to 5). Combined effects of facial heights, GDs, BCs, judges' sexes, ages, and jobs, and their 2-way interactions were tested using a mixed-model multiple linear regression and a Bonferroni test. Zones of ideal features were determined for all judges and also for each group using repeated-measures ANOVAs and the Bonferroni test (α=0.05). RESULTS: Judges' sex but not their age or expertise might affect their perception of female beauty: men gave higher scores. The normal face was perceived as more beautiful than the long face (the short face being the least attractive). Zero GD was the most attractive followed by 4 mm; 6 mm was the least appealing. BCs of 15% followed by 10% were the most attractive ones, while 25% BC was the worst. The zone of ideal anatomy was: long face + 0mm GD + 15% BC; normal face + 2mm GD + 15% BC; long face + 2mm GD + 15% BC; normal face + 0mm GD + 15% BC. CONCLUSIONS: Normal faces, zero GDs, and 15% BCs may be the most appealing. Facial heights affect the perception of beauty towards GDs but not BCs.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Ortodontistas , Masculino , Humanos , Feminino , Psicometria , Estética Dentária , Gengiva
9.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 207, 2024 Feb 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38336704

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the outcome quality of manual and digital orthodontic diagnostic setups in non-extraction cases according to the American Board of Orthodontics model grading system and to calculate the laboratory time needed for orthodontic diagnostic setup construction. METHODS: The sample consisted of 60 pretreatment models of non-extraction orthodontic cases with age ranges of 18-30. The study models were duplicated and scanned with 3Shape R-750 scanner. Digital and manual diagnostic setups were constructed according to their respective treatment plans. Digital diagnostic setups were 3D printed and then both manual and digital setups were assessed using the modified American Board of Orthodontics Cast Radiograph evaluation score (ABO CRE), which includes alignment, marginal ridge, buccolingual inclination, occlusal contacts, occlusal relationships, interproximal contacts, and overjet. The laboratory time needed for orthodontic setups was measured in minutes. RESULTS: The total ABO CRE score of the digital diagnostic setup group (5.93 ± 2.74) was significantly lower than that of the manual diagnostic setup group (13.08 ± 3.25). The manual diagnostic setup had significantly larger scores in marginal ridge, overjet, overbite, buccolingual inclination, occlusal relationship, and total scores (P < 0.01). However, the digital diagnostic setup had a statistically larger occlusal contacts score than the manual diagnostic setup (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between the alignment and the interproximal contacts scores in either group. The manual diagnostic setup needed significantly longer laboratory time (187.8 ± 14.22) than the digital setup (93.08 ± 12.65) (P < 0.01). Comparison between broken teeth was performed by using the chi-square test which found no significant difference between different tooth types. CONCLUSIONS: Digital diagnostic setup is a reliable tool for orthodontic diagnostic setup construction providing excellent quality setup models. Manual diagnostic setup is time consuming with a technique-sensitive laboratory procedure.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão Classe II de Angle , Ortodontia , Dente , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Má Oclusão Classe II de Angle/terapia
10.
J World Fed Orthod ; 13(2): 86-94, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38378393

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to examine how well patients can differentiate between orthodontists and dentists. METHODS: Four hundred patients who applied to the Ondokuz Mayis University Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology between March and November of 2022 were queried regarding the difference between an orthodontist and a dentist via a face-to-face survey. The respondents were separated into the following two study groups: patients who had previously undergone orthodontic treatment and those who had not. Demographic data of the patients, such as age, sex, educational status, and monthly income, were also collected, and the effects of these factors on their doctor preferences were analyzed. RESULTS: The vast majority of respondents (>85%) thought that a dentist should be an orthodontic specialist to provide orthodontic treatment. Seven percent of patients chose to receive orthodontic treatment from a dentist. Patients who chose an orthodontist for their treatment were predominantly female and had a high income and a higher level of education. Patients who had a history of orthodontic treatment were better aware of the profession of orthodontics than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that the respondents did not fully understand the clear distinction between an orthodontist and a dentist. This outcome suggests that education concerning this issue is required.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Ortodontistas , Assistência Odontológica , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(2): 134, 2024 Feb 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38316644

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) has to compete with other specialties for the best candidates. With the upcoming change of generations (Z and Alpha) and the movement toward gender parity of dentistry, understanding changing preferences and misconceptions is essential. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An online survey was conducted by the German-Association-of-Oral-and-Maxillofacial-Surgery (DGMKG) across German dental schools. The survey collected demographic data, academic background, and career aspirations, with a focus on OMFS. The dental student survey results were compared to a survey given to OMFS Specialists. RESULTS: 637 dental students, mainly female (70%), from 30 German universities participated. 27% had defined career aspirations post-graduation, with self-employment and academia being popular choices. 67% were unsure. Specializations leaned towards restorative dentistry (41%), orthodontics (36%), and prosthodontics (31%). While 73% showed interest in surgical practices, 20% were attracted in specializing in OMFS. Of those averse to OMFS, 78% cited long training duration as the deterrent, 12% were put off by perceived unattractive working hours. Other reasons included negative undergraduate experiences, scarcity of part-time positions, and perceived inadequate earnings. CONCLUSION: Accurate data is crucial for career decisions. OMFS societies must proactively share accurate information and guide students. OMFS offers family-friendly hours, and while its training might be longer than dental specialties, it is on par with other surgical professions. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dental students consistently regard OMFS as commendable career path. To guarantee sustained OMFS expertise, it is imperative to nurture this interest through dedicated academic mentorship and innovative education, thereby solidifying their professional direction.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Cirurgia Bucal , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Estudantes de Odontologia , Escolha da Profissão , Cirurgia Bucal/educação , Inquéritos e Questionários , Alemanha
13.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 165(4): 383-384, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38402482

RESUMO

As a specialty board, the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) serves to protect the public and the orthodontic specialty by certifying orthodontists. The demonstration of commitment to lifelong learning and self-improvement is critical to achieving the highest level of patient care. The ABO completed a practice analysis study in 2023 to ensure all examinations represent current assessments of proficiency in orthodontics at a level of quality that satisfies professional expectations. The practice analysis is essential to providing a demonstrable relationship between the examination content and orthodontic practice and provides a critical foundation for ABO's examination programs.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Ortodontistas , Assistência Odontológica
14.
15.
Zhonghua Kou Qiang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 59(2): 149-156, 2024 Feb 09.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38280735

RESUMO

Objective: To compare the impact of orthodontic treatment on pulp volume in adolescents and adults. Methods: Cone-beam CT data of 62 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics, Stomatological Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, from January 2019 to March 2022 were collected. Patients were divided into two age groups (31 patients in each group): adolescent group (aged 13-17, 17 males and 14 females) and adult group (aged 21-25, 12 males and 19 females). Pre-and post-treatment reconstructions of the pulp and dental tissues of upper first molars (UM1) and lower central incisors (L1) were performed. Measurements included pulp volume for UM1 (UM1 P) and L1 (L1 P), pulp chamber volume (UM1 PC) and root canal volume (UM1 RC) for UM1, root length for L1 (L1 RL), and mesiobuccal root length for UM1 (UM1 RL), as well as chamber heights at specific landmarks [the lengths from the central fossa fusion site to the roof of the pulp chamber (H1), the floor of the pulp chamber (H2), the nearest point of root divergence as well as crown-root bifurcation (H3), the farthest point of root divergence (H4), and the pulp chamber height (H5)] in UM1. Changes in these indices were calculated and analyzed using paired and independent sample t-tests for within-group and between-group differences, respectively. Pearson correlation was used to assess potential associations among H5, root length, and pulp volume changes. Results: Before and after orthodontic treatment, no significant difference was observed in the adult group for L1 P (t=-0.03, P=0.975), while significant differences were noted for UM1 P, UM1 PC, and UM1 RC (t=9.98, P<0.001; t=9.04, P<0.001; t=6.69, P<0.001). In the adolescent group, significant differences were found for both L1 P and UM1 P (t=2.25, P=0.029; t=6.30, P<0.001). After orthodontic treatment, the absolute value changes of UM1 P, UM1 PC, and L1 P in the adolescent group were (19.75±9.58), (15.07±7.65) and (1.89±6.29) mm3, respectively, and in the adult group were (13.33±9.41), (9.16±7.05) and (0.02±4.66) mm3, respectively (t=3.77, P<0.001; t=4.48, P<0.001; t=2.34, P=0.048). There was no significant absolute difference in the amount of UM1 RC between the two groups after orthodontic treatment (t=0.86, P=0.391). Before and after orthodontic treatment, the absolute value changes of L1 RL, H1 and H5 in the adolescent group were (0.54±0.41), (0.38±0.27) and (0.71±0.33) mm, respectively, and the absolute value changes in the adult group were (0.78±0.62), (0.26±0.20) and (0.57±0.28) mm, respectively (t=-2.43, P=0.017; t=2.96, P=0.004; t=2.57, P=0.011). Whereas no significant differences were observed for UM1 RL, H2, H3, and H4 (t=-0.85, P=0.400; t=0.43, P=0.669; t=-0.50, P=0.619; t=1.46, P=0.148). Additionally, significant correlations were found between changes in H5 and UM1 RL with UM1 P (r=0.35, P<0.001; r=0.19, P=0.030), but not between Changes in L1 RL and L1 P (r=0.11, P>0.05). Conclusions: The effect of orthodontic treatment on pulp volume in adolescents and adults were different.


Assuntos
Polpa Dentária , Ortodontia , Adulto , Masculino , Feminino , Humanos , Adolescente , Polpa Dentária/diagnóstico por imagem , Raiz Dentária , Cavidade Pulpar , Dente Molar , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico
16.
J World Fed Orthod ; 13(2): 57-64, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38228450

RESUMO

Aligner orthodontics has gained significant popularity as an alternative to traditional braces because of its aesthetic appeal and comfort. The biomechanical principles that underlie aligner orthodontics play a crucial role in achieving successful outcomes. The biomechanics of aligner orthodontics revolve around controlled force application, tooth movement, and tissue response. Efficient biomechanics in aligner orthodontics involves consideration of attachment design and optimized force systems. Attachments are tooth-colored shapes bonded to teeth, aiding in torque, rotation, and extrusion movements. Optimized force systems ensure that forces are directed along the desired movement path, reducing unnecessary strain on surrounding tissues. Understanding and manipulating the biomechanics of aligner orthodontics is essential for orthodontists to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. This approach requires careful treatment planning, considering the mechanics required for each patient's specific malocclusion. As aligner orthodontics continues to evolve, advances in material science and treatment planning software contribute to refining biomechanical strategies, enhancing treatment efficiency, and expanding the scope of cases that can be successfully treated with aligners.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão , Braquetes Ortodônticos , Ortodontia , Humanos , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Estética Dentária , Má Oclusão/terapia
17.
Dentomaxillofac Radiol ; 53(3): 178-188, 2024 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38265247

RESUMO

Applications of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in orthodontics have been increasingly discussed and evaluated in science and practice over the last two decades. The present work provides a comprehensive summary of current consolidated practice guidelines, cutting-edge innovative applications, and future outlooks about potential use of CBCT in orthodontics with a special focus on upper airway analysis in patients with sleep-disordered breathing. The present scoping review reveals that clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are broadly supported by evidence for the diagnosis of dental anomalies, temporomandibular joint disorders, and craniofacial malformations. On the other hand, CBCT imaging for upper airway analysis-including soft tissue diagnosis and airway morphology-needs further validation in order to provide better understanding regarding which diagnostic questions it can be expected to answer. Internationally recognized guidelines for CBCT use in orthodontics are existent, and similar ones should be developed to provide clear indications about the appropriate use of CBCT for upper airway assessment, including a list of specific clinical questions justifying its prescription.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico Espiral , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular , Humanos , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/diagnóstico por imagem , Ortodontia/métodos , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/diagnóstico por imagem , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico/métodos
18.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 165(1): 7-17, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37930299

RESUMO

Orthodontists are well placed to detect soft-tissue disease of the oral cavity and associated structures because of the frequent repeat examinations of their patients. This review describes the clinical manifestations, pathologic features, and treatment of the soft-tissue pathology most likely to be encountered by the orthodontist and uncommon soft-tissue disease with significant implications for the patient. The recognition of soft-tissue disease will allow reassurance, referral, and early intervention when required.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Patologia Bucal , Humanos , Ortodontistas , Assistência Odontológica , Boca
19.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop ; 165(1): 64-72.e12, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37715755

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about how precisely orthodontists in the United States (US) assess crowding or at what range of crowding they recommend extraction. This study aimed to assess the relationship between estimated crowding in patients with a Class I relationship and extraction recommendation by orthodontists in the US. The secondary aims were to evaluate the accuracy and precision of clinician estimations and determine if clinician background traits play a role in extraction decision-making. METHODS: An electronic survey was prepared using 4 patients with a Class I relationship with anterior crowding selected from a University Orthodontics Clinic and was sent to approximately 10,400 subjects through Facebook and the American Association of Orthodontists Partners in Research program. RESULTS: From the 297 responses received, most clinicians recommended extraction once crowding reached 9-10 mm in either the maxilla or the mandible. The data from 2 patients suggest this decision was more strongly correlated with mandibular crowding. Clinician estimations varied widely but, on average, were precise within approximately 2 mm of objective measurements. There was a tendency to overestimate crowding, especially by Northeastern practitioners. Clinicians who reported routinely measuring crowding or who reported that they recommended extractions to >10% of their patients were 1.2-2.0 and 1.4-1.6 times more likely, respectively, to recommend extraction in the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Crowding estimation was highly subjective and varied widely among clinicians. Most clinicians recommended extraction once maxillary or mandibular crowding approximated 9-10 mm. Some clinician demographics were correlated with the precision and accuracy of estimations and the likelihood of extraction in the patients.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão , Ortodontia , Humanos , Extração Dentária , Má Oclusão/terapia , Assistência Odontológica , Ortodontistas , Mandíbula
20.
Eur J Orthod ; 46(1)2024 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38071431

RESUMO

AIM: To identify practices of assessment of gender effects in research articles in orthodontics and detect whether there were significant differences in the treatment effects on outcomes according to gender. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four major orthodontic journals were sought over a 3-year period to identify publications which included assessment of gender effects on outcomes in their reporting. Data were extracted on the following characteristics: journal, year of publication, region of authorship, and study design. For the studies including reporting of gender effects, whether a significant effect existed was further documented. Additionally, for these studies, data were extracted on population, sample size per gender, treatment, comparison, outcome type, and nature and whether gender analysis was based on subgroup testing or included as a main effect. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations, univariable, and multivariable regression models were utilized as appropriate. RESULTS: A total of 718 research articles were eligible for inclusion out of a pool of 1,132 screened articles. Of those, 95 reported on any type of analysis on gender effects (95/718; 13.2%). In the 95 studies that reported assessment of gender effects, it was clear that the majority did not detect significant gender-related differences across the documented outcomes (range of frequency distribution for significant gender differences across all outcomes: 0-50%). Twenty-two articles overall (22/95; 23.2%) described a significant gender effect classified by outcome, 12 favoring female and 10 favoring male participants. Patterns of efficacy and adverse outcomes were schemed either favoring female (root resorption: 4/10; 40.0%, periodontal outcomes: 3/11; 27.3%) or male (cephalometric/growth changes following orthodontic treatment: 4/17; 23.5%) patients across the 22 studies with significant effects. Appropriately designed and adequately powered statistical analyses, with gender effect assessment as a main effect in a multivariable regression model was associated with 6.53 times higher odds for identifying significant gender effects (OR = 6.53; 95% CI: 2.15, 19.8; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: A very small proportion of research studies included gender effect assessment in their analyses. Of those, a quarter described significant effects. Nevertheless, careful analysis planning and strategies should be prioritized to allow for any meaningful interpretation.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Projetos de Pesquisa , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Tamanho da Amostra , Autoria
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