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1.
Clin Imaging ; 81: 122-135, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34710802

RESUMO

Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a distinct disease entity of unknown etiology primarily affecting children and adolescents. It is an autoinflammatory process that typically affects multiple bones with a waxing and waning course. About one third of the patients diagnosed with CRMO have spinal involvement which can lead to long term morbidity. The clinical presentation and imaging features of CRMO involving the spine are nonspecific and can mimic other disease processes like infection or malignancy. Since imaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and management of CRMO, we intend to highlight various imaging patterns of spinal CRMO alongside its clinical features and briefly discuss its imitators, management and outcomes.


Assuntos
Osteomielite , Imagem Corporal Total , Adolescente , Criança , Doença Crônica , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Osteomielite/diagnóstico por imagem , Radiologistas , Recidiva
2.
Clin Imaging ; 81: 60-61, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34619565

RESUMO

From the more than 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 in the US and the nearly 5 million worldwide, there emerge even more stories than match the statistics when one considers all of the patients' relations. While the numbers are staggering, when we humanize the stories, we are left with even greater devastation, of course. One of the stories among so many that seemed particularly salient and poignant to us was the death of Dr. Susan Moore. Her plaintive Facebook post, which went viral in December 2020, was made a few weeks before she died at the age of 52 from COVID-19 and claimed that she was a victim of racially biased treatment at a hospital in Indiana. It was Dr. Moore's mentioning of CT scans that led us to reflect on the biases of some health care workers and the role of radiologists. Our initial interface with our patients is actually not with their faces, but with their films. This dynamic does not eliminate any biases we may harbor but shields practitioners and patients from potential glaring racial biases in this first and sometimes only stage of the relationship.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , COVID-19 , Viés , Feminino , Humanos , Radiologistas , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Clin Imaging ; 81: 87-91, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34655997

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate how patients experience a radiologist-patient consultation of imaging findings directly after neck ultrasonography (US), and how much time this consumes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective randomized study included 109 consecutive patients who underwent neck US, of whom 44 had a radiologist-patient consultation of US results directly after the examination, and 65 who had not. RESULTS: The median ratings of all healthcare quality metrics (friendliness of the radiologist, explanation of the radiologist, skill of the radiologist, radiologist's concern for comfort during the examination, radiologist's concern for patient questions/worries, overall rating of the examination, and likelihood of recommending the examination) were either good/high or very good/very high, without any significant differences between both patient groups. Patients who did not discuss the US results with the radiologist, were significantly more worried during the examination (P = 0.040) and had significantly higher anxiety levels after completion of the US examination (P = 0.027) than patients who discussed the US results with the radiologist. Fifty-one out of 55 responding patients (92.7%) indicated a radiologist-patient consultation of US results to be important. The median duration of US examinations that included a radiologist-patient consultation of US results was 7.57 min (range: 5.15-12.10 min), while the median duration of US examinations without a radiologist-patient consultation of US results was 7.34 min (range: 3.45-14.32 min), without any significant difference (P = 0.637). CONCLUSION: A radiologist-patient consultation of imaging findings after neck US decreases patient anxiety, is desired by most patients, and does not significantly prolong total examination time.


Assuntos
Radiologia , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Radiologistas , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Ultrassonografia
4.
Clin Imaging ; 81: 98-102, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34678654

RESUMO

Disparities exist in access to a multitude of screening and diagnostic imaging examinations and procedures. To address these disparities within radiology, emphasis so far has been placed upon diversifying the workforce and formally educating trainees on healthcare disparities. Currently, there is no organized and nationally accepted educational program or content for practicing radiologists specific to diversity and healthcare disparity. This void can be addressed by providing an educational curriculum framework for practicing radiologists based on three key factors: individual efforts, calling for institutional change, and national collaboration. Individual efforts should focus on acknowledging the existence of disparities, understanding the contribution of one's implicit bias in perpetuating disparities, understanding and highlighting issues related to insurance coverage of radiology examinations, and participating in radiology political action committees. These efforts can be facilitated by a consolidated web-based training program for practicing radiologists. To pave the way for meaningful systemic change, the implementation of institutional change like that initiated by the Culture of Safety movement in 2002 is needed. A national collaborative effort initiated by radiology organizations to empower radiologists and recognize positive changes would further provide support. SUMMARY: A three-pronged educational framework combining individual radiologist education, institutional change, and national collaboration will enable radiologists to play a role in addressing imaging-related disparities in healthcare.


Assuntos
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Radiologia , Currículo , Humanos , Radiografia , Radiologistas , Radiologia/educação
5.
Neuroimaging Clin N Am ; 32(1): 1-18, 2022 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34809832

RESUMO

American College of Radiology NI-RADS is a surveillance imaging template used to predict residual or recurrent tumor in the setting of head and neck cancer. The lexicon and imaging template provides a framework to standardize the interpretations and communications with referring physicians and provides linked management recommendations, which add value in patient care. Studies have shown reasonable interreader agreement and excellent discriminatory power among the different NI-RADS categories. This article reviews the literature associated with NI-RADS and serves as a practical guide for radiologists interested in using the NI-RADS surveillance template at their institution, highlighting frequently encountered pearls and pitfalls.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Diagnóstico por Imagem , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/diagnóstico por imagem , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Radiologistas , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço/diagnóstico por imagem
6.
Radiol Technol ; 93(2): 150-160, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34728577

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine whether radiologic technologists are manipulating projections to lower patient dose in routine pediatric radiography examinations. METHODS: Using a descriptive survey approach, members from the American Society of Radiologic Technologists with a primary registration in radiography were randomly selected and invited to share their experiences using alternative projections during routine pediatric radiography examinations. RESULTS: For this study, 404 completed responses were analyzed. More than half of the participants (67.6%) strongly agreed or somewhat agreed that the use of alternative projections can reduce pediatric dose during routine radiography examinations, and more than half (61.3%) strongly agreed, agreed, or somewhat agreed that the use of alternative projections is beneficial for dose reduction. Incidentally, the most common response from participants regarding their use of alternative projections during routine pediatric radiography examinations was occasionally or sometimes. Nearly three-fourths of the participants strongly agreed that radiation protection guidelines are important to follow during routine pediatric radiography examinations. Although many radiologic technologists in this sample felt proficient using alternative projections during pediatric procedures, they also believed additional training in such methods would be beneficial. DISCUSSION: Most institutions have imaging protocols in place; however, the use of alternative methods of projection during routine pediatric radiography examinations might heighten current radiation protection guidelines, leading to protocol changes to reduce dose and improve the overall wellbeing of pediatric patients. Furthermore, recent recommendations in the field of medical imaging regarding patient shielding practices might deem positioning to be a more important method for dose reduction. Consultations from radiologists might be necessary to ensure that image quality is sufficient and diagnostic detail is not compromised. Additional training specific to using alternative projections during routine pediatric radiography examinations also might be warranted. CONCLUSION: Current practices do not suggest alternative methods of projection are applied regularly during routine pediatric radiography examinations. Considerations should be made to allow technologists to manipulate projections when permitted.


Assuntos
Proteção Radiológica , Criança , Humanos , Equipamentos de Proteção , Doses de Radiação , Radiografia , Radiologistas , Inquéritos e Questionários
7.
Radiol Technol ; 93(2): 197CT-219CT, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34728586

RESUMO

Acute pancreatitis can cause serious but nonspecific symptoms, and rapid diagnosis often is critical for patient outcomes. There are varying causes of acute pancreatitis making diagnosis difficult. A combination of patient history assessment, laboratory tests, and imaging examinations is indicated to diagnose the disease definitively. Computed tomography is the primary tool for diagnosing, classifying, and determining treatment for acute pancreatitis. Various methods of staging acute pancreatitis are used to assist radiologists and other physicians in determining the severity and course of treatment of the disease.


Assuntos
Pancreatite , Doença Aguda , Humanos , Pancreatite/diagnóstico por imagem , Pancreatite/etiologia , Exame Físico , Radiologistas , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
8.
Rofo ; 193(12): 1411-1425, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34814198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has gained worldwide acceptance and implementation as an alternative therapeutic option in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis unable to safely undergo surgical aortic valve replacement. This transformative technique places the radiologist in a key position in the pre-procedural assessment of potential candidates for this technique, delivering key anatomical information necessary for patient eligibility and procedural safety. Recent trials also provide encouraging results to potentially extend the indication to patients with safer risk profiles. METHOD: The review is based on a PubMed literature search using the search terms "transcatheter heart valve", "TAVI", "TAVR", "CT", "imaging", "MR" over a period from 2010-2020, combined with personal comments based on the author's experience. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: CT plays a prominent role in the pre-procedural workup, delivering as a true 3D imaging modality optimal visualization of the complex anatomy of the aortic root with simultaneous evaluation of the patency of the different access routes. As such, the contribution of CT is key for the determination of patient eligibility and procedural safety. This input is supplementary to the contributions of other imaging modalities and forms an important element in the discussions of the Heart Valve Team. Knowledge of the procedure and its characteristics is necessary in order to provide a comprehensive and complete report. While the role of CT in the pre-procedural evaluation is well established, the contribution of CT and MR and the clinical significance of their findings in the routine follow-up after the intervention are less clear and currently the subject of intense investigation. Important issues remain, including the occurrence and significance of subclinical leaflet thrombosis, prosthetic heart valve endocarditis, and long-term structural valve degeneration. KEY POINTS: · CT plays a crucial role in evaluating transcatheter heart valve candidates. · Evaluation must include the dimensions of the aortic root and access paths. · The exact post-procedural role of CT and MRI has not yet been determined.. CITATION FORMAT: · Salgado R, El Addouli H, Budde RP. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: The Evolving Role of the Radiologist in 2021. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2021; 193: 1411 - 1425.


Assuntos
Estenose da Valva Aórtica , Implante de Prótese de Valva Cardíaca , Substituição da Valva Aórtica Transcateter , Valva Aórtica/diagnóstico por imagem , Valva Aórtica/cirurgia , Estenose da Valva Aórtica/diagnóstico por imagem , Estenose da Valva Aórtica/cirurgia , Humanos , Radiologistas , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
Rofo ; 193(12): 1480-1481, 2021 Dec.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34814205
10.
Cancer Imaging ; 21(1): 63, 2021 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34823599

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Structured reporting and standardized criteria are increasingly recognized as means of improving both radiological and clinical practice by allowing for better content and clarity. Our aim was to examine oncologists' opinions and expectations concerning the radiologist's report to identify general needs in daily practice and ways to improve interdisciplinary communication. METHODS: A 19-question survey was sent to 230 oncologists from three different countries (France, Romania, Switzerland) identified on the online web pages of different hospitals and private clinics. The survey was sent by electronic mail with an online survey program (Google Forms®). All recipients were informed of the purpose of the study. The data were collected by the online survey program and analysed through filtering the results and cross-tabulation. RESULTS: A total of 52 responses were received (response rate of 22.6%). The majority of the respondents (46/52, 88%) preferred the structured report, which follows a predefined template. Most of the respondents (40/52, 77%) used RECIST 1.1 or iRECIST in tumour assessment. Nearly half of the oncologists (21/52, 40%) measured 1-3 cases per week. On a 10-point Likert scale, 34/52 (65%) oncologists rated their overall level of satisfaction with radiologists' service between 7 and 10. In contrast, 12/52 (19%) oncologists rated the radiologists' service between 1 and 4. Moreover, 42/52 (80%) oncologists acknowledged that reports created by a radiologist with a subspecialty in oncologic imaging were superior to those created by a general radiologist. CONCLUSION: Structured reports in oncologic patients and the use of RECIST criteria are preferred by oncologists in their daily clinical practice, which signals the need for radiologists also to implement such reports to facilitate communication. Furthermore, most of the oncologists we interviewed recognized the added value provided by radiologists specializing in oncologic imaging. Because this subspecialty is present in only a few countries, generally in large clinics, further training might become a challenge; nevertheless, intensive efforts should be made to enhance expertise in cancer imaging.


Assuntos
Oncologistas , Sistemas de Informação em Radiologia , Radiologia , Humanos , Oncologia , Radiologistas
12.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(Suppl 4): 768-770, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34718316

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Radiologist workload had increased significantly within the past three decades. In 2006-2007, the average annual workload per FTE radiologist was 14,900 procedures, an increase of 7% since 2002-2003 and 34.0% since 1991-1992. Annual RVUs per FTE radiologist were 10 200, an increase of 10% since 2002-2003 and 70.3% since 1991-1992. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study included worksheets data of three radiology specialists in their first three years as specialists. Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively for the period frame January 1st to September 21st 2018. The total data of imaging procedures by one radiologist had been collected and then separated by different imaging procedures as followed. RESULTS: Average total number of imaging procedures per radiologist was 2785. Separately, there were: 850 bone X ray images, 550 chest X rays, 250 ultrasound examinations, 860 CTs and 256 MRIs. Daily average of analyzed imaging procedures per radiologist was as followed: 7.4 bone X ray images, 4.8 chest X rays, 2.2 ultrasounds, 7.5 CTs and 2.2 MRIs. Total working time per radiologist in the analyzed time period was 684 hours. Average time spent for analyzing per one imaging procedure was 14 minutes and 45 seconds spread in total 114 working days. CONCLUSIONS: The conclusion is that current workload for a radiology specialist obviously represents a necessity to be thoroughly explored. This case study and previous literature results indicate that a well constructed large scale study represents a potential in resolving the previous studies limitations and providing relevant data, so correct measures and guidelines could be developed.


Assuntos
Radiologia , Carga de Trabalho , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Radiologistas , Estudos Retrospectivos
13.
Rofo ; 193(11): 1356, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34710928
14.
Dent Med Probl ; 58(3): 405-410, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34597483

RESUMO

Work is a fundamental axis for the development of societies and human well-being, but if a person cannot adapt to their work area and work environment, the individual may be affected by occupational or coexisting illnesses that get exacerbated when working.A scientific search was conducted in the main health databases - MEDLINE (via PubMed), Web of Science, SciELO, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Dialnet - using the keywords "occupational health", "occupational diseases", "occupational accidents" AND "oral radiology" OR "oral radiologists". Systematic reviews as well as observational, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. Case reports, letters to the editor, editorials, and opinion articles were excluded. In total, 496 articles were recovered, and only 51 fulfilled the selection criteria. Signs and symptoms that affect oral radiologists include back pain, shoulder pain, wrist pain, tenosynovitis, computer vision syndrome (CVS), stress, depression, and burnout syndrome. Preventive occupational health (OH) measures are proposed to help eliminate or alleviate the symptoms associated with non-ergonomic habits at work. Oral radiologists are exposed to several risks and occupational diseases inherent and/or related to their work. By implementing simple habits and ergonomic advice, well-documented in the literature, these risks can be avoided.This review aimed to provide scientific information on the current concepts of OH in oral radiologists in order to help prevent occupational diseases and occupational accidents, and guarantee safe professional practice.


Assuntos
Doenças Profissionais , Saúde do Trabalhador , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Doenças Profissionais/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças Profissionais/epidemiologia , Doenças Profissionais/etiologia , Radiologistas
15.
Neuroimaging Clin N Am ; 31(4): 409-431, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34689925

RESUMO

Skull base surgery relies on the assessment of detailed neuroimaging studies to assist with surgical planning. We review typical neuroimaging features associated with common neurosurgical skull base approaches, highlighting relevant imaging anatomy and pertinent postoperative imaging appearances.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos , Base do Crânio , Endoscopia , Humanos , Neuroimagem , Radiologistas , Base do Crânio/diagnóstico por imagem , Base do Crânio/cirurgia
16.
Neuroimaging Clin N Am ; 31(4): 433-449, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34689926

RESUMO

Initially developed as a minimally invasive technique to approach inflammatory conditions, transnasal endoscopic surgery has progressively expanded its anatomic targets and clinical indications. Consequently, numerous surgical approaches to the anterior and central skull base were developed, referred to as extended endonasal approaches (EEA). The intrinsic advantage of EEA is the exploitation of a natural corridor provided by sinonasal airspaces, with no need for skin incision and osteotomy and limited soft tissue damage. In this context, imaging plays essential role, demonstrating the relevant anatomic relationships of the lesion, the proper surgical corridor, the anatomic variants that may increase the surgical risk.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Base do Crânio , Endoscopia , Humanos , Radiologistas , Base do Crânio/diagnóstico por imagem , Base do Crânio/cirurgia , Neoplasias da Base do Crânio/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias da Base do Crânio/cirurgia
17.
Neuroimaging Clin N Am ; 31(4): 451-471, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34689927

RESUMO

Appropriate imaging strategies for the detection, treatment planning, and posttreatment monitoring of vestibular schwannomas will be discussed. The typical and variant imaging appearances of vestibular schwannomas, as well as the imaging features that should prompt consideration of differential diagnoses, will be illustrated. Understanding the natural history of vestibular schwannomas, optimal measurement and definition of tumour growth helps the radiologist evaluate for the failure of conservative management and requirement for surgery or radiotherapy. In order to determine the success of conservative management, the radiologist is required to understand the natural history of vestibular schwannomas and how tumour growth is defined. Finally, the imaging features which help guide appropriate treatment with surgery or radiotherapy will be highlighted, and the expected posttreatment imaging changes will be described.


Assuntos
Neuroma Acústico , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Neuroma Acústico/diagnóstico por imagem , Neuroma Acústico/terapia , Radiologistas
18.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 6(1): 65, 2021 10 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34648124

RESUMO

In radiological screening, clinicians scan myriads of radiographs with the intent of recognizing and differentiating lesions. Even though they are trained experts, radiologists' human search engines are not perfect: average daily error rates are estimated around 3-5%. A main underlying assumption in radiological screening is that visual search on a current radiograph occurs independently of previously seen radiographs. However, recent studies have shown that human perception is biased by previously seen stimuli; the bias in our visual system to misperceive current stimuli towards previous stimuli is called serial dependence. Here, we tested whether serial dependence impacts radiologists' recognition of simulated lesions embedded in actual radiographs. We found that serial dependence affected radiologists' recognition of simulated lesions; perception on an average trial was pulled 13% toward the 1-back stimulus. Simulated lesions were perceived as biased towards the those seen in the previous 1 or 2 radiographs. Similar results were found when testing lesion recognition in a group of untrained observers. Taken together, these results suggest that perceptual judgements of radiologists are affected by previous visual experience, and thus some of the diagnostic errors exhibited by radiologists may be caused by serial dependence from previously seen radiographs.


Assuntos
Julgamento , Percepção Visual , Viés , Humanos , Radiologistas , Reconhecimento Psicológico
19.
Eur J Radiol ; 144: 109992, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34634535

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify factors associated with false or indeterminate US result for suspected appendicitis, and assess whether multi-categorical reporting of US yields more precise estimates regarding the probability of appendicitis. METHODS: 562 US examinations for suspected appendicitis between May 2013-April 2015 were categorized as true (77/562 true positives or true negatives) or false/indeterminate (485/562 false negatives, false positives or indeterminates) based on results from a prior study. Of 541 examinations with images available retrospectively, a category of A-E was assigned as follows: non-visualized appendix with secondary findings (A) absent or (B) present; appendix visualized and considered (C) negative, (D) equivocal, or (E) positive for appendicitis. The following factors were recorded: age; sex; scan time (daytime vs. off-hours); resident/fellow involvement; abdominal subspecialty radiologist; radiologist experience (>5 years or not); and tenderness on interrogation. Associations between factors and US result were assessed (t-tests, Fisher's exact test and multivariate logistic regression). RESULTS: The true group had proportionally more males (18/77 (23.4%) vs. 66/485 (13.6%), p = 0.04) and patients with sonographic tenderness (43/77 (55.8%) vs. 132/353 (27.3%), p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference or association with other factors. On multivariate logistic regression, false/indeterminate results were 1.9 times (95% CIs 1.0-3.5) more likely among females and 3.8 times more likely in the absence of tenderness (95% CIs 2.3-6.4). The proportion of patients with appendicitis in categories A-E was 34/410 (8.3%), 24/44 (54.5%), 0/18 (0%), 0/3 (0%) and 61/66 (92.4%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Females and absence of tenderness were associated with a false/indeterminate US. Categorical reporting provides more granular estimates of the post-test probability of appendicitis.


Assuntos
Apendicite , Apêndice , Adulto , Apendicite/diagnóstico por imagem , Apendicite/epidemiologia , Apêndice/diagnóstico por imagem , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Radiologistas , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Ultrassonografia
20.
Eur J Radiol ; 144: 110002, 2021 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34700092

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To examine the performance of radiologists in differentiating COVID-19 from non-COVID-19 atypical pneumonia and to perform an analysis of CT patterns in a study cohort including viral, fungal and atypical bacterial pathogens. METHODS: Patients with positive RT-PCR tests for COVID-19 pneumonia (n = 90) and non-COVID-19 atypical pneumonia (n = 294) were retrospectively included. Five radiologists, blinded to the pathogen test results, assessed the CT scans and classified them as COVID-19 or non-COVID-19 pneumonia. For both groups specific CT features were recorded and a multivariate logistic regression model was used to calculate their ability to predict COVID-19 pneumonia. RESULTS: The radiologists differentiated between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 pneumonia with an overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 88% ± 4 (SD), 79% ± 6 (SD), and 90% ± 6 (SD), respectively. The percentage of correct ratings was lower in the early and late stage of COVID-19 pneumonia compared to the progressive and peak stage (68 and 71% vs 85 and 89%). The variables associated with the most increased risk of COVID-19 pneumonia were band like subpleural opacities (OR 5.55, p < 0.001), vascular enlargement (OR 2.63, p = 0.071), and subpleural curvilinear lines (OR 2.52, p = 0.021). Bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules were associated with decreased risk of COVID-19 pneumonia with OR of 0.30 (p = 0.013) and 0.10 (p < 0.001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Radiologists can differentiate between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 atypical pneumonias at chest CT with high overall accuracy, although a lower performance was observed in the early and late stage of COVID 19 pneumonia. Specific CT features might help to make the correct diagnosis.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Influenza Humana , Humanos , Pulmão , Radiologistas , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
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