Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 70.976
Filtrar
1.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15868, 2024 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38982186

RESUMO

Practicing complex locomotor skills, such as those involving a step sequence engages distinct perceptual and motor mechanisms that support the recall of learning under new conditions (i.e., skill transfer). While sleep has been shown to enhance learning of sequences of fine movements (i.e., sleep-dependent consolidation), here we examined whether this benefit extends to learning of a locomotor pattern. Specifically, we tested the perceptual and motor learning of a locomotor sequence following sleep compared to wake. We hypothesized that post-practice sleep would increase locomotor sequence learning in the perceptual, but not in the motor domain. In this study, healthy young adult participants (n = 48; 18-33 years) practiced a step length sequence on a treadmill cued by visual stimuli displayed on a screen during training. Participants were then tested in a perceptual condition (backward walking with the same visual stimuli), or a motor condition (forward walking but with an inverted screen). Skill was assessed immediately, and again after a 12-h delay following overnight sleep or daytime wake (n = 12 for each interval/condition). Off-line learning improved following sleep compared to wake, but only for the perceptual condition. Our results suggest that perceptual and motor sequence learning are processed separately after locomotor training, and further points to a benefit of sleep that is rooted in the perceptual as opposed to the motor aspects of motor learning.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem , Sono , Humanos , Adulto , Sono/fisiologia , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Aprendizagem/fisiologia , Adolescente , Destreza Motora/fisiologia , Locomoção/fisiologia , Movimento/fisiologia , Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia , Caminhada/fisiologia
2.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15238, 2024 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956282

RESUMO

The vector forces at the human-mattress interface are not only crucial for understanding the distribution of vertical and shear forces exerted on the human body during sleep but also serves as a significant input for biomechanical models of sleeping positions, whose accuracy determines the credibility of predicting musculoskeletal system loads. In this study, we introduce a novel method for calculating the interface vector forces. By recording indentations after supine and lateral positions using a vacuum mattress and 3D scanner, we utilize image registration techniques to align body pressure distribution with the mattress deformation scanning images, thereby calculating the vector force values for each unit area (36.25 mm × 36.25 mm). This method was validated through five participants attendance from two perspectives, revealing that (1) the mean summation of the vertical force components is 98.67% ± 7.21% body weight, exhibiting good consistency, and mean ratio of horizontal component force to body weight is 2.18% ± 1.77%. (2) the predicted muscle activity using the vector forces as input to the sleep position model aligns with the measured muscle activity (%MVC), with correlation coefficient over 0.7. The proposed method contributes to the vector force distribution understanding and the analysis of musculoskeletal loads during sleep, providing valuable insights for mattress design and evaluation.


Assuntos
Leitos , Sono , Humanos , Sono/fisiologia , Masculino , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Adulto , Feminino , Postura/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem , Imageamento Tridimensional/métodos
3.
Women Health ; 64(6): 501-512, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38965034

RESUMO

The aim of this study is to investigate the mediating role of sleep quality in the relationship between multidimensional perceived social support and fatigue among mothers of twin infants. One hundred and six (106) twin mothers participated in this cross-sectional study, who completed the Descriptive Information Form, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Checklist Individual Strength. The scale score averages of the mothers in the study are as follows: social support, 61.41 ± 23.86; fatigue, 77.64 ± 28.68; and sleep quality, 8.26 ± 2.38. According to the path model, perceived social support has a negative effect on poor sleep quality (p = .001, Beta = -0.411), and poor sleep quality has a positive effect on fatigue (p = .001, Beta = 0.335). Sleep quality also mediates the effect of multidimensional perceived social support on mothers' fatigue levels (p = .001, Beta = -0.138). The study results suggest that the perceived social support and fatigue levels of twin mothers are moderate, while their sleep quality is poor. Therefore, mothers of twin infants may benefit from increased social support to alleviate fatigue and enhance sleep quality.


Assuntos
Fadiga , Mães , Qualidade do Sono , Apoio Social , Gêmeos , Humanos , Feminino , Mães/psicologia , Fadiga/psicologia , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Gêmeos/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Lactente , Percepção , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adulto Jovem , Sono/fisiologia
4.
PLoS One ; 19(7): e0305258, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38976698

RESUMO

Understanding a person's perceived quality of sleep is an important problem, but hard due to its poor definition and high intra- as well as inter-individual variation. In the short term, sleep quality has an established impact on cognitive function during the following day as well as on fatigue. In the long term, good quality sleep is essential for mental and physical health and contributes to quality of life. Despite the need to better understand sleep quality as an early indicator for sleep disorders, perceived sleep quality has been rarely modeled for multiple consecutive days using biosignals. In this paper, we present novel insights on the association of cardiac activity and perceived sleep quality using an interpretable modeling approach utilizing the publicly available intensive-longitudinal study M2Sleep. Our method takes as input signals from commodity wearable devices, including motion and blood volume pulses. Despite processing only simple and clearly interpretable features, we achieve an accuracy of up to 70% with an AUC of 0.76 and reduce the error by up to 36% compared to related work. We further argue that collected biosignals and sleep quality labels should be normalized per-participant to enable a medically insightful analysis. Coupled with explainable models, this allows for the interpretations of effects on perceived sleep quality. Analysis revealed that besides higher skin temperature and sufficient sleep duration, especially higher average heart rate while awake and lower minimal activity of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system while asleep increased the chances of higher sleep quality.


Assuntos
Qualidade do Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Frequência Cardíaca/fisiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Estudos Longitudinais , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Percepção/fisiologia
5.
PLoS Biol ; 22(7): e3002684, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38976664

RESUMO

In the past 20 years, more remarkable revelations about sleep and its varied functions have arguably been made than in the previous 200. Building on this swell of recent findings, this essay provides a broad sampling of selected research highlights across genetic, molecular, cellular, and physiological systems within the body, networks within the brain, and large-scale social dynamics. Based on this raft of exciting new discoveries, we have come to realize that sleep, in this moment of its evolution, is very much polyfunctional (rather than monofunctional), yet polyfunctional for reasons we had never previously considered. Moreover, these new polyfunctional insights powerfully reaffirm sleep as a critical biological, and thus health-sustaining, requisite. Indeed, perhaps the only thing more impressive than the unanticipated nature of these newly emerging sleep functions is their striking divergence, from operations of molecular mechanisms inside cells to entire group societal dynamics.


Assuntos
Sono , Animais , Humanos , Encéfalo/fisiologia , Sono/fisiologia
6.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1819, 2024 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38978056

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This prospective cohort study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep duration and cancer incidence among 9996 participants over a median follow-up period of 9 years. METHODS: Participants without cancer at baseline were followed for over 88,790 person-years. The incidence of cancer and sleep duration was self-reported. The relationship between sleep duration and cancer incidence was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for various confounding factors, including age, gender, lifestyle factors, and comorbidities. RESULTS: During the follow-up, 325 participants were diagnosed with incident cancer, resulting in an incidence rate of 20.49 per 1000 person-years. After adjusting for confounders, a total sleep duration of less than 6 h was significantly associated with an increased risk of cancer (HR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.01-1.61). This association was particularly strong for cancers in the digestive and respiratory systems (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.03-1.93). Longer sleep durations (> 9 h) showed a potential increase in cancer risk, but results were not consistently significant. Age-stratified analyses revealed a similar significant increase in cancer incidence among individuals aged 60 years or younger with less than 6 h of sleep per day, showing a 35% increase in overall cancer risk and an 83% increase in digestive and respiratory system cancer. No significant association was found between nocturnal sleep durations or daytime naps and cancer incidence. However, a significant interaction was observed between daytime naps longer than 30 min and cancer incidence in women (p = 0.041). CONCLUSIONS: We observed that short sleep duration may increase the risk of cancer, particularly cancers in the digestive and respiratory systems. Additionally, while longer sleep durations might also increase cancer risk, this finding requires validation with larger sample sizes.


Assuntos
Neoplasias , Sono , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Idoso , Incidência , Fatores de Tempo , Fatores de Risco , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos de Coortes , Duração do Sono , População do Leste Asiático
7.
PLoS One ; 19(7): e0306822, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38980861

RESUMO

Studies have reported that health care professionals experienced a lack of sleep during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and that such lack of sleep and working environment affect their performance. However, to the authors' knowledge, no study has yet investigated the relationship between sleep duration and working environment among Japanese physiotherapists during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study retrospectively investigated the sleep duration of physiotherapists directly providing physiotherapy to patients with COVID-19 within the red zone and analyzed the association between sleep duration and working environment using logistic regression analysis. Among the 565 physiotherapists studied, the average sleep duration was 6 (6-7) h, and 381 (67.4%) had an average sleep duration of ≤6 h. Less experienced physiotherapists were 1.03 times more likely to sleep ≤6 h, and those in charge of patients with COVID-19 as the supervisor ordered were 0.64 times more likely to sleep ≤6 h. Moreover, physiotherapists with a significant increase in the frequency of internal online meetings and those who had been providing physiotherapy to patients with COVID-19 for >6 months were 2.34 and 2.05 times more likely to sleep ≤6 h, respectively. During the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan, two-thirds of the physiotherapists directly providing physiotherapy to patients with COVID-19 slept less than the recommended duration. This study highlights the need for appropriate workload and work hour management for physiotherapists according to their experience and workload, as well as establishing a medical care system that includes work rotation to ensure that the recommended sleep duration is satisfied.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Fisioterapeutas , Sono , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Japão/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Feminino , Masculino , Adulto , Sono/fisiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Local de Trabalho , Fatores de Tempo , Condições de Trabalho , Duração do Sono
8.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15001, 2024 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38951618

RESUMO

Daylight saving time (DST) is currently utilized in many countries with the rationale that it enhances the alignment between daylight hours and activity peaks in the population. The act of transitioning into and out of DST introduces disruptions to the circadian rhythm, thereby impacting sleep and overall health. Despite the substantial number of individuals affected, the consequences of this circadian disruption have often been overlooked. Here, we employ a mathematical model of the human circadian pacemaker to elucidate how the biological clock interacts with daytime and evening exposures to both natural and electrical light. This interaction plays a crucial role in determining the adaptation to the 1 hour time zone shift imposed by the transition to or from DST. In global discussions about DST, there is a prevailing assumption that individuals easily adjust to DST transitions despite a few studies indicating that the human circadian system requires several days to fully adjust to a DST transition. Our study highlights that evening light exposure changes can be the main driving force for re-entrainment, with chronobiological models predicting that people with longer intrinsic period (i.e. later chronotype) entrain more slowly to transitions to or from DST as compared to people with a shorter intrinsic period (earlier chronotype). Moreover, the model forecasts large inter-individual differences in the adaptation speed, in particular during the spring transition. The predictions derived from our model offer circadian biology-based recommendations for light exposure strategies that facilitate a more rapid adaptation to DST-related transitions or travel across a single time zone. As such, our study contributes valuable insights to the ongoing discourse on DST and its implications for human circadian rhythms.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Fotoperíodo , Humanos , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Luz , Sono/fisiologia , Modelos Teóricos , Adaptação Fisiológica , Relógios Biológicos/fisiologia , Relógios Circadianos/fisiologia , Modelos Biológicos
9.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1768, 2024 Jul 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38961409

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As components of a 24-hour day, sedentary behavior (SB), physical activity (PA), and sleep are all independently linked to cardiovascular health (CVH). However, insufficient understanding of components' mutual exclusion limits the exploration of the associations between all movement behaviors and health outcomes. The aim of this study was to employ compositional data analysis (CoDA) approach to investigate the associations between 24-hour movement behaviors and overall CVH. METHODS: Data from 581 participants, including 230 women, were collected from the 2005-2006 wave of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). This dataset included information on the duration of SB and PA, derived from ActiGraph accelerometers, as well as self-reported sleep duration. The assessment of CVH was conducted in accordance with the criteria outlined in Life's Simple 7, encompassing the evaluation of both health behaviors and health factors. Compositional linear regression was utilized to examine the cross-sectional associations of 24-hour movement behaviors and each component with CVH score. Furthermore, the study predicted the potential differences in CVH score that would occur by reallocating 10 to 60 min among different movement behaviors. RESULTS: A significant association was observed between 24-hour movement behaviors and overall CVH (p < 0.001) after adjusting for potential confounders. Substituting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for other components was strongly associated with favorable differences in CVH score (p < 0.05), whether in one-for-one reallocations or one-for-remaining reallocations. Allocating time away from MVPA consistently resulted in larger negative differences in CVH score (p < 0.05). For instance, replacing 10 min of light physical activity (LPA) with MVPA was related to an increase of 0.21 in CVH score (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.11 to 0.31). Conversely, when the same duration of MVPA was replaced with LPA, CVH score decreased by 0.67 (95% CI -0.99 to -0.35). No such significance was discovered for all duration reallocations involving only LPA, SB, and sleep (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: MVPA seems to be as a pivotal determinant for enhancing CVH among general adult population, relative to other movement behaviors. Consequently, optimization of MVPA duration is an essential element in promoting overall health and well-being.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Exercício Físico , Comportamento Sedentário , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Fatores de Tempo , Sono/fisiologia , Estados Unidos , Idoso , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
10.
Trials ; 25(1): 443, 2024 Jul 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38961430

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are 12-fold more likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) 4-6 years after delivery than women without GDM. Similarly, GDM is associated with the development of common mental disorders (CMDs) (e.g. anxiety and depression). Evidence shows that holistic lifestyle interventions focusing on physical activity (PA), dietary intake, sleep, and mental well-being strategies can prevent T2D and CMDs. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a holistic lifestyle mobile health intervention (mHealth) with post-GDM women in preventing T2D and CMDs in a community setting in Singapore. METHODS: The study consists of a 1-year randomised controlled trial (RCT) with a 3-year follow-up period. Post-GDM women with no current diabetes diagnosis and not planning to become pregnant will be eligible for the study. In addition, participants will complete mental well-being questionnaires (e.g. depression, anxiety, sleep) and their child's socio-emotional and cognitive development. The participants will be randomised to either Group 1 (Intervention) or Group 2 (comparison). The intervention group will receive the "LVL UP App", a smartphone-based, conversational agent-delivered holistic lifestyle intervention focused on three pillars: Move More (PA), Eat Well (Diet), and Stress Less (mental wellbeing). The intervention consists of health literacy and psychoeducational coaching sessions, daily "Life Hacks" (healthy activity suggestions), slow-paced breathing exercises, a step tracker (including brisk steps), a low-burden food diary, and a journaling tool. Women from both groups will be provided with an Oura ring for tracking physical activity, sleep, and heart rate variability (a proxy for stress), and the "HAPPY App", a mHealth app which provides health promotion information about PA, diet, sleep, and mental wellbeing, as well as display body mass index, blood pressure, and results from the oral glucose tolerance tests. Short-term aggregate effects will be assessed at 26/27 weeks (midpoint) and a 1-year visit, followed by a 2, 3, and 4-year follow-up period. DISCUSSION: High rates of progression of T2D and CMDs in women with post-GDM suggest an urgent need to promote a healthy lifestyle, including diet, PA, sleep, and mental well-being. Preventive interventions through a holistic, healthy lifestyle may be the solution, considering the inextricable relationship between physical and psychological health. We expect that holistic lifestyle mHealth may effectively support behavioural changes among women with a history of GDM to prevent T2D and CMDs. TRIAL STATUS: The protocol study was approved by the National Healthcare Group in Singapore, Domain Specific Review Board (DSRB) [2023/00178]; June 2023. Recruitment began on October 18, 2023. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05949957. The first submission date is June 08, 2023.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Diabetes Gestacional , Telemedicina , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Povo Asiático/psicologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevenção & controle , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Diabetes Gestacional/prevenção & controle , Diabetes Gestacional/psicologia , Exercício Físico , Seguimentos , Estilo de Vida Saudável , Saúde Holística , Estilo de Vida , Transtornos Mentais/prevenção & controle , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Saúde Mental , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Singapura , Sono , Fatores de Tempo
11.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1364106, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38966216

RESUMO

Background: A rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes is an urgent public health concern among older adults, especially in developing countries such as China. Despite several studies on lifestyle factors causing diabetes, sleep, a key contributor, is understudied. Our study investigates the association between night sleep duration and diabetes onset over a 7-year follow-up to fill information gaps. Method: A population-based cohort study with 5437 respondents used 2011-2018 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study data. Using self-reported night sleep duration from the 2011 baseline survey, information on new-onset diabetes was collected in follow-up surveys. Baseline characteristics of participants with vs. without new-onset diabetes were compared using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. Multivariable Cox regression models estimated the independent relationship between night sleep and new-onset diabetes. The addictive Cox regression model approach and piece-wise regression described the nonlinear relationship between night sleep and new-onset diabetes. Subgroup analysis was also performed by age, gender, body measurement index, dyslipidemia, drinking status, smoking, hypertension, and afternoon napping duration. Result: 549 respondents acquired diabetes during a median follow-up of 84 months. After controlling for confounders, night sleep duration was substantially linked with new-onset diabetes in the multivariable Cox regression model. The risk of diabetes is lower for respondents who sleep longer than 5 hours, except for those who sleep over 8 hours [5.1-6h Hazard ratios (HR) [95% confidence intervals (CI)] = 0.71 (0.55, 0.91); 6.1-7h HR = 0.69 (0.53, 0.89); 7.1-8h HR = 0.58 (0.45, 0.76)]. Nonlinear connections were delineated by significant inflection points at 3.5 and 7.5 hours, with a negative correlation observed only between these thresholds. With one hour more night sleep, the risk of diabetes drops 15%. BMI and dyslipidemia were identified as modifiers when only consider the stand linear effect of sleep duration on diabetes. Conclusion: This study establishes a robust association between night sleep and new-onset diabetes in middle-aged and older Chinese individuals within the 3.5-7.5-hour range, offering a foundation for early glycemic management interventions in this demographic. The findings also underscore the pivotal role of moderate night sleep in preventing diabetes, marking a crucial juncture in community medical research.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Longitudinais , Idoso , Seguimentos , Sono/fisiologia , Fatores de Risco , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Aposentadoria , Fatores de Tempo , Prevalência , Duração do Sono
12.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1340131, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38966223

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate the association between bedtime and infertility and to identify the optimal bedtime for women of reproductive age. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from 3,903 female participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2015 to 2020. The effect of bedtime on female infertility was assessed using the binary logistic regression in different models, including crude model and adjusted models. To identify the non-linear correlation between bedtime and infertility, generalized additive models (GAM) were utilized. Subgroup analyses were conducted by age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, physical activity total time, marital status, smoking status, drinking status and sleep duration. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders (age, race, sleep duration, waist circumference, marital status, education, BMI, smoking status, drinking status and physical activity total time), a non-linear relationship was observed between bedtime and infertility, with the inflection point at 22:45. To the left side of the inflection point, no significant association was detected. However, to the right of it, bedtime was positively related to the infertility (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.39; P = 0.0049). Subgroup analyses showed that late sleepers with higher BMI were more prone to infertility than those with a lower BMI (BMI: 25-30 kg/m2: OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.51; P = 0.0136; BMI ≥ 30 kg/m²: OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.09 to 1.34; P = 0.0014). Conclusion: Bedtime was non-linearly associated with infertility, which may provide guidance for sleep behavior in women of childbearing age.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Infertilidade Feminina , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Sono , Humanos , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Adulto , Infertilidade Feminina/epidemiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Exercício Físico , Adulto Jovem , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Circunferência da Cintura/fisiologia , Fatores de Tempo
13.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1383449, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38966704

RESUMO

Background: This study aims to investigate the independent causal relation between height, screen time, physical activity, sleep and myopia. Methods: Instrumental variables (IVs) for exposures and outcome were obtained from the largest publicly available genome-wide association studies (GWAS) databases. First, we performed a bidirectional univariate MR analysis using primarily the inverse variance weighted method (IVW) with height, screen time, physical activity and sleep as the exposure and myopia as the outcome to investigate the causal relationship between exposures and myopia. Sensitivity analysis was used to demonstrate its robustness. Then the multivariable MR (MVMR) and MR-based mediation approach was further used to estimate the mediating effect of potential confounders (education and time outdoors) on causality. Results: The results of univariate MR analysis showed that taller height (OR = 1.009, 95% CI = 1.005-1.012, p = 3.71 × 10-7), longer time on computer (OR = 1.048, 95% CI = 1.029-1.047, p = 3.87 × 10-7) and less moderate physical activity (OR = 0.976, 95% CI = 0.96-0.991 p = 2.37 × 10-3) had a total effect on the increased risk of developing myopia. Meanwhile our results did not have sufficient evidence to support the causal relationship between chronotype (p = 0.637), sleep duration (p = 0.952) and myopia. After adjusting for education, only taller height remains an independent risk factor for myopia. After adjusting for education, the causal relationship between height, screen and myopia still had statistical significance. A reverse causal relationship was not found in our study. Most of the sensitivity analyses showed consistent results with those of the IVW method. Conclusion: Our MR study revealed that genetically predicted taller height, longer time on computer, less moderate physical activity increased the risk of myopia. After full adjustment for confounders, only height remained independently associated with myopia. As a complement to observational studies, the results of our analysis provide strong evidence for the improvement of myopia risk factors and provide a theoretical basis for future measures to prevent and control myopia in adolescents.


Assuntos
Estatura , Exercício Físico , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Miopia , Tempo de Tela , Sono , Humanos , Miopia/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Fatores de Risco , Masculino , Causalidade , Feminino
14.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15184, 2024 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956441

RESUMO

Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep-wake changes and depressive symptoms events among midlife women. We enrolled 1579 women aged 44-56 years who had no clinically relevant depressive symptoms at baseline. Depressive symptoms were assessed at each visit using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. At the third and fourth follow-up visits, women reported their sleep habits. The sleep midpoint was defined as the time to fall asleep plus one-half of the sleep duration. Sleep-wake changes were determined by the difference in the midpoint of sleep between the third and fourth visits, which were 1 year apart. The median follow-up time was 7 years (range 1-7 years). Cox proportional hazard models were fitted to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the incidence of depressive symptoms associated with sleep-wake changes. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of depressive symptoms for severe sleep midpoint changes was 1.51 (1.12, 2.05) compared with mild sleep midpoint changes. This relationship remained statistically significant and changed little when additionally controlling for sleep duration, sleep quality, insomnia symptoms, use of sleep medications, use of nervous medications, glucose, insulin, lipids, dietary energy intake, and C-reactive protein. Our findings indicate that exposure to long-term severe sleep-wake changes increases the risk of depressive symptoms in midlife women.


Assuntos
Depressão , Sono , Humanos , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Depressão/epidemiologia , Adulto , Sono/fisiologia , Incidência , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Qualidade do Sono , Vigília/fisiologia , Fatores de Risco , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia
15.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 21(1): 66, 2024 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956566

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence has shown that the individual metrics in Life's Essential 8 (LE8), an updated cardiovascular health (CVH) concept proposed by the American Heart Association, play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological evidence on the overall LE8 on IBD risk remains limited. We aimed to assess the longitudinal associations of LE8-defined CVH and the risks of IBD and its subtypes, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We also tested whether genetic susceptibility could modify these associations. METHODS: A total of 260,836 participants from the UK Biobank were included. LE8 scores were determined by 8 metrics (physical activity, diet, nicotine exposure, sleep, body mass index, blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood lipids), and were divided into three levels: low CVH (0-49), moderate CVH (50-79), and high CVH (80-100). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) of the risk of IBD in relation to CVH status. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up 12.3 years, we documented 1,500 IBD cases (including 1,070 UC and 502 CD). Compared to participants with low CVH, the HRs (95% CIs) of those with high CVH for IBD, UC, and CD were 0.67 (0.52, 0.83), 0.70 (0.52, 0.93), and 0.55 (0.38, 0.80), respectively. These associations were not modified by genetic susceptibility (all P for interactions > 0.05). The lowest HR (UC: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.20-0.45; CD: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.20-0.57) was observed in participants with both high CVH and low genetic risk. CONCLUSIONS: Better CVH, defined by LE8, was associated with significantly lower risks of IBD, UC, and CD, irrespective of genetic predisposition. Our results underscore the importance of adherence to LE8 guidelines for maintaining CVH as a potential strategy in the prevention of IBD.


Assuntos
Doença de Crohn , Dieta , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Reino Unido , Adulto , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/genética , Doença de Crohn/genética , Exercício Físico , Idoso , Índice de Massa Corporal , Colite Ulcerativa/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Longitudinais , Pressão Sanguínea , Sono , Glicemia/metabolismo
16.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 22(1): 52, 2024 Jul 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956578

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The shift work schedule is a common work arrangement that can disrupt typical sleep-wake rhythms and lead to negative health consequences. The present study aims to examine the effect of shift work on health-related quality of life (QoL) and explore potential behaviorial mediators (i.e., sleep, eating, exercise, smoking, drinking). METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 4,449 petroleum workers in southwest China. Data on shift work status, health behaviors, and physical and mental health QoL were collected. We tested our model using path analysis and the Monte Carlo approach among 2,129 included participants. RESULTS: After adjusting for covariates, shift work did not exhibit a significant direct association with QoL. However, shift work indirectly related to poorer physical health quality of life via less frequent healthy food consumption; shift work also indirectly related to poorer mental health QoL via both less frequent healthy food consumption and physical exercise. No significant indirect effects were found via sleeping, smoking, or drinking. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that shift work presents a challenge for QoL among Chinese petroleum workers due to their lesser engagement in two specific health behaviors: healthy eating and physical exercise. Healthy eating and exercise may present an even more prominent threat to shift workers' QoL than sleep and substance use. Strategies targeting shift work schedule as well as eating and exercise behaviors may help protect against poor QoL and adverse physical and mental health outcomes in this vulnerable group.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Qualidade de Vida , Jornada de Trabalho em Turnos , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Masculino , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Adulto , China , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Jornada de Trabalho em Turnos/psicologia , Jornada de Trabalho em Turnos/efeitos adversos , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Sono , Petróleo , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/psicologia
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(27): e38698, 2024 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38968530

RESUMO

Sleep inadequacy has previously been associated with increased risk of injury and reduced performance. It is unclear if sleep disorders are associated with musculoskeletal symptoms, which may be a predictor of serious injury and affect performance. The aim was therefore to assess sleep behavior in elite junior badminton players and its association to musculoskeletal symptoms. In 2018, players at the World Junior Badminton Championship completed the Athlete Sleep Behavior Questionnaire and a modified version of the World Olympic Association Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire. Participants were categorized with poor or moderate/good sleep behavior as the independent variable. Musculoskeletal symptoms were the primary outcome and was categorized using yes/no questions. Relevant musculoskeletal symptoms were defined as pain higher than 30 mm Numeric Rating Scale pain score or more than 30 minutes of joint stiffness a day. Group comparison was performed using chi-square analysis and logistic regression for primary outcome adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, previous injury, training load, and resting days. Of the 153 participants, 28% reported poor sleep scores. There was no difference between poor and moderate/good sleep score concerning demographic variables such as sex, age, ethnicity, previous injury, training load, and resting days. There were 27% with current musculoskeletal symptoms but with no difference in groups between poor and moderate/good sleep score (P = .376). This yielded an adjusted odds ratio of 1.23 (95% confidence intervals 0.52; 2.90). Twenty-eight percent of the participants reported poor sleep behavior. Twenty-seven percent experienced current musculoskeletal symptoms. We found no statistical differences in reported musculoskeletal symptoms when comparing athletes with poor sleep behavior to athletes with moderate/good sleep behavior.


Assuntos
Esportes com Raquete , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Esportes com Raquete/lesões , Feminino , Adolescente , Inquéritos e Questionários , Atletas/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/epidemiologia , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/fisiopatologia , Sono/fisiologia , Dor Musculoesquelética/epidemiologia
18.
Transl Vis Sci Technol ; 13(7): 3, 2024 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38953853

RESUMO

Purpose: To identify the accelerometer-measured daily behaviors that mediate the association of refractive status with depressive disorders and enhance the understanding of behavioral differences in depression. Methods: Participants with baseline mean spherical equivalent (MSE) and 7-day accelerometer measurements from the UK Biobank were included in this cohort study. Refractive status was categorized as hyperopia and non-hyperopia. Four daily behaviors, including moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity (LPA), sedentary, and sleep were recorded between 2013 and 2015. We also assessed 24-hour behavior patterns. Depression cases were defined through both questionnaires and hospital records over 10 years of follow-up. Results: Among 20,607 individuals, every 0.5-diopter increase in MSE was associated with a 6% higher risk of depressive disorders, with hyperopia participants at a higher risk than non-hyperopia participants (odds ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.23; P = 0.001). MVPA and sleep time significantly correlated with depressive disorders, with odds ratios of 0.79 and 1.14 (P < 0.05). MSE showed significant correlations with all four behaviors. The effects of MVPA and sleep duration on MSE and depressive disorders varied throughout the day. Mediation analyses showed that MVPA and sleep partially mediated the relationship between MSE and depressive disorders, with 35.2% of the association between moderate to high hyperopia and depression mediated by MVPA. Conclusions: Physical activity and sleep significantly mediate the relationship between MSE and depressive disorders. Translational Relevance: The mediation effect of MVPA highlights its therapeutic potential in reducing the risk of depression among individuals with moderate to severe hyperopia. Interventions aimed at increasing daytime MVPA and decreasing daytime sleep could enhance mental health in this vulnerable group.


Assuntos
Acelerometria , Transtorno Depressivo , Exercício Físico , Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Transtorno Depressivo/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo/psicologia , Adulto , Sono/fisiologia , Idoso , Comportamento Sedentário , Inquéritos e Questionários , Hiperopia/fisiopatologia , Hiperopia/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
19.
PLoS One ; 19(7): e0304413, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38954679

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sedatives are commonly used to promote sleep in intensive care unit patients. However, it is not clear whether sedation-induced states are similar to the biological sleep. We explored if sedative-induced states resemble biological sleep using multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. METHODS: Multichannel EEG datasets from two different sources were used in this study: (1) sedation dataset consisting of 102 healthy volunteers receiving propofol (N = 36), sevoflurane (N = 36), or dexmedetomidine (N = 30), and (2) publicly available sleep EEG dataset (N = 994). Forty-four quantitative time, frequency and entropy features were extracted from EEG recordings and were used to train the machine learning algorithms on sleep dataset to predict sleep stages in the sedation dataset. The predicted sleep states were then compared with the Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/ Sedation (MOAA/S) scores. RESULTS: The performance of the model was poor (AUC = 0.55-0.58) in differentiating sleep stages during propofol and sevoflurane sedation. In the case of dexmedetomidine, the AUC of the model increased in a sedation-dependent manner with NREM stages 2 and 3 highly correlating with deep sedation state reaching an AUC of 0.80. CONCLUSIONS: We addressed an important clinical question to identify biological sleep promoting sedatives using EEG signals. We demonstrate that propofol and sevoflurane do not promote EEG patterns resembling natural sleep while dexmedetomidine promotes states resembling NREM stages 2 and 3 sleep, based on current sleep staging standards.


Assuntos
Dexmedetomidina , Eletroencefalografia , Hipnóticos e Sedativos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Propofol , Sevoflurano , Sono , Humanos , Hipnóticos e Sedativos/farmacologia , Hipnóticos e Sedativos/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Adulto , Feminino , Sono/efeitos dos fármacos , Sono/fisiologia , Propofol/farmacologia , Propofol/administração & dosagem , Sevoflurano/farmacologia , Sevoflurano/efeitos adversos , Sevoflurano/administração & dosagem , Dexmedetomidina/farmacologia , Fases do Sono/efeitos dos fármacos , Adulto Jovem
20.
J Gerontol Nurs ; 50(7): 12-18, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38959511

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Physical disabilities may exacerbate the natural decline in sleep quality that occurs with aging. In the current study, we assessed sleep quality and medicinal sleep aid use among 87 community-dwelling older adults with (n = 24) and without (n = 63) physical disabilities. METHOD: Sleep quality, duration, and efficiency were assessed subjectively with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Sleep duration and efficiency were objectively measured with actigraphy. Participants self-reported medicinal sleep aid use. RESULTS: Significant group differences were observed in sleep duration measured objectively (p = 0.01) and subjectively (p = 0.04). No other group differences were observed for sleep factors (p > 0.05) or medicinal sleep aid use (p = 0.41). CONCLUSION: Findings show that physical disability may be a factor in sleep duration; however, physical disability was not found to be associated with worsened sleep perception or greater reliance on medicinal sleep aids. Future research should consider longer objective actigraphy assessment windows and explore potential subgroup differences in sex and race/ethnicity. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 50(7), 12-18.].


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Vida Independente , Qualidade do Sono , Humanos , Idoso , Masculino , Feminino , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Pobreza , Actigrafia , Sono/fisiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...