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1.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1329092, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38585272

RESUMO

Background: There is a paucity of data on the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in feces of lactating women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their breastfed infants as well as associations between fecal shedding and symptomatology. Objective: We examined whether and to what extent SARS-CoV-2 is detectable in the feces of lactating women and their breastfed infants following maternal COVID-19 diagnosis. Methods: This was a longitudinal study carried out from April 2020 to December 2021 involving 57 breastfeeding maternal-infant dyads: 33 dyads were enrolled within 7 d of maternal COVID-19 diagnosis, and 24 healthy dyads served as controls. Maternal/infant fecal samples were collected by participants, and surveys were administered via telephone over an 8-wk period. Feces were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Results: Signs/symptoms related to ears, eyes, nose, and throat (EENT); general fatigue/malaise; and cardiopulmonary signs/symptoms were commonly reported among mothers with COVID-19. In infants of mothers with COVID-19, EENT, immunologic, and cardiopulmonary signs/symptoms were most common, but prevalence did not differ from that of infants of control mothers. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in feces of 7 (25%) women with COVID-19 and 10 (30%) of their infants. Duration of fecal shedding ranged from 1-4 wk for both mothers and infants. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was sparsely detected in feces of healthy dyads, with only one mother's and two infants' fecal samples testing positive. There was no relationship between frequencies of maternal and infant SARS-CoV-2 fecal shedding (P=0.36), although presence of maternal or infant fever was related to increased likelihood (7-9 times greater, P≤0.04) of fecal shedding in infants of mothers with COVID-19.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Lactente , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , SARS-CoV-2 , Aleitamento Materno , Teste para COVID-19 , Lactação , Estudos Longitudinais , RNA Viral , Prevalência , Fezes
2.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1286891, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38496391

RESUMO

Background: Although vaccination is one of the most effective means of controlling the spread of COVID-19, public concerns and indecision about vaccination still continue. Because pregnant and breastfeeding individuals are at high risk for severe outcomes in case of infections, determining their level of hesitation and attitude toward COVID-19 vaccines will guide the management of the disease. This study aimed to determine pregnant and breastfeeding women's levels of hesitation and attitude toward COVID-19 vaccines as well as their related factors. Methods: The sample of this descriptive research consisted of 103 pregnant or breastfeeding individuals who were seen at the obstetrics and gynecology outpatients clinic of a state hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using a 'demographic data form', the 'Vaccine Hesitancy Scale in Pandemic', and the 'Attitudes toward COVID-19 Vaccine Scale'. The research data were analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. Results: The mean age of the participants was 29.71 ± 4.75, 51% were pregnant, and 74.8% had received the COVID-19 vaccine. The mean score of the 'Vaccination Hesitancy Scale in Pandemic' was 30.83 ± 6.91, and the mean score for the 'Attitude Scale toward the COVID-19 Vaccine' was 25.50 ± 5.20. A significant difference was found between the total score of the 'Vaccine Hesitation Scale in the Pandemic' and the mean score of the 'Lack of Confidence' sub-dimension between the 'working status' and the 'influenza vaccination' status. In terms of the mean score of the 'Risk' sub-dimension, a significant difference was found between the 'period of vaccination' (p < 0.05). According to the mean total score of the 'Attitude Towards COVID-19 Vaccine Scale', there was a significant difference between the 'smoking' status. There was a significant difference in the 'Positive Attitude' sub-dimension in terms of the 'flu vaccination' status. There was a significant difference in the 'Negative Attitude' sub-dimension in terms of the 'chronic disease' status. A positive correlation was found between the total scores of the scales. Conclusion: It was concluded that although the participants had a high level of hesitation toward the COVID-19 vaccine, they had a positive attitude. The results obtained will be guided in determining the strategies to be developed for these specific groups in future pandemics.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Obstetrícia , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Aleitamento Materno , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial
3.
Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol ; 228(1): 88-96, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38330963

RESUMO

SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 disease are thought to have an impact on breastfeeding rate - besides other known peripartal issues. Data of the national CRONOS registry regarding breastfeeding behavior in 6,746 women was analyzed regarding the time window between maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection and time of delivery. In addition, other influencing factors like the predominant viral variant, maternal disease severity, and gestational age at delivery were taken into account. Our data suggest that within the variables analyzed, in the case of acute maternal infection (<14 days before birth), breastfeeding behavior improved with increasing gestational age at birth (p<0.0001), with less severe maternal illness (p<0.0001) and as the pandemic progressed with less virulent viral variants (p=0.01). When adjusting for COVID-19-associated and non-associated factors, rooming-in remains the most important factor positively influencing breastfeeding behavior. With regards to the benefits for mother and infants from breastfeeding, a separation of mother and child even in case of infectious settings should be avoided.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Aleitamento Materno , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Mães , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/epidemiologia
4.
Breastfeed Med ; 19(3): 166-176, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38416483

RESUMO

Background: Benefits of early skin-to-skin contact (SSC) between mother and newborn are widely documented, including improved breastfeeding outcomes. While promoting immediate SSC is standard practice for vaginal birth, it happens less often after cesarean birth. It is not known how changes in hospital practices and staffing shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic have influenced the practice of SSC in the operating room (OR). This study aims to identify the relationship between SSC after cesarean birth and breastfeeding and compare SSC before and during the COVID-19 pandemic at a single institution. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 244 subjects who had scheduled cesarean births during 2019 and 2020. The primary outcome was newborn feeding at hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes were time to initiate breastfeeding, newborn feeding at 4-8-weeks postpartum, and location of SSC initiation in 2019 versus 2020. Results: SSC within 3 days of birth was significantly associated with feeding type on discharge and/or 4-8 weeks postpartum. More subjects intending to exclusively breastfeed met this intention at discharge with SSC in the OR. Newborns who had SSC in the OR had significantly earlier initiation of breastfeeding. There was an increase in SSC in the OR between 2019 (27%) and 2020 (39%). Conclusion: SSC in the OR was associated with improved short-term breastfeeding outcomes in our study. If immediate SSC is not possible, SSC within 3 days of birth may have breastfeeding benefits. The increase in SSC in the OR during the COVID-19 pandemic indicates that SSC practices can be implemented, despite challenging circumstances.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Feminino , Gravidez , Recém-Nascido , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Pandemias , Relações Mãe-Filho , Tato , COVID-19/epidemiologia
5.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 76: 30-37, 2024 Feb 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38340676

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To analyze breastfeeding and the factors that positively influence the first hour of life, during hospitalization, and at discharge during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DESIGN AND METHOD: This is a retrospective cohort study, with data collected from medical records. Consisting of 225 mother-newborn dyads with deliveries between 2020 and 2021. Breastfeeding in the first hour of life, during hospitalization, and at discharge was considered as the outcome variable. The independent variables were sociodemographic, obstetric, and neonatal data. The analysis was performed with bivariate and multivariate regression through a generalized linear model (Poisson family), with a 5% significance level. It was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB), under approval number 4,911,317. RESULT: Newborns of women without COVID-19 suspicion or diagnosis and who had skin-to-skin contact with their mother at birth are twice as likely to be breastfed in the first hour of life. Absence of complications in the newborn during hospitalization and no COVID-19 suspicion or diagnosis double the exclusive breastfeeding rate during hospitalization. Newborns exclusively breastfed during hospitalization present 1.6 times more chances of being exclusively breastfeeding at hospital discharge. CONCLUSION: It was evidence that women who gave birth without COVID-19 suspicion, and newborns who had skin-to-skin contact with their mother at birth represented a predictive factor for favoring exclusive breastfeeding. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: This research contributes to the innovation of evaluating breastfeeding in the newborn's first hour of life, during hospitalization, and at discharge in a pandemic context.

6.
Breastfeed Med ; 19(2): 120-128, 2024 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38386992

RESUMO

Objective: To assess the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on breastfeeding initiation (BFI) and duration among women enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for women, infants, and children (WIC) in Washington District of Columbia (DC). Materials and Methods: We used WIC program data from Washington DC to assess the pandemic's impact on BFI and duration among WIC recipients. t-Tests and unadjusted odds ratios compared breastfeeding outcomes before and during the pandemic. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models estimated the pandemic's impact on initiation and duration, respectively, while controlling for social determinants of health and other factors. Results: BFI was similar among women who gave birth before (61.4%) or during the pandemic (60.4%) (p = 0.359). However, the proportion of women who breastfed at 1 month decreased significantly from 56.1% (before pandemic) to 47.6% (during pandemic) (p < 0.0001). This pattern for duration continued at 3 and 6 months: 46.9% to 37.1% (p < 0.0001) at 3 months and 34.8% to 25.7% (p < 0.0001) at 6 months. On average, women who delivered during the pandemic breastfed 33.9 fewer days than those who delivered before (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: BFI among DC WIC recipients was similar for infants born before or during the pandemic, and determinants of initiation remained similar to previous reports (e.g., race/ethnicity, education). However, for women who initiated breastfeeding, average duration was significantly lower for infants born during the pandemic than before. Our findings suggest the importance of leveraging WIC and other breastfeeding supports to promote breastfeeding during pandemics and other emergencies.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Lactente , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , District of Columbia/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pobreza , Escolaridade
7.
Int Breastfeed J ; 19(1): 5, 2024 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238855

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in human breast milk is contentious, anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies have been consistently detected in human breast milk. However, it is uncertain when and how long the antibodies are present. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study including all consecutive pregnant women with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, recruited at six maternity units in Spain and Hong Kong from March 2020 to March 2021. Colostrum (day of birth until day 4 postpartum) and mature milk (day 7 postpartum until 6 weeks postpartum) were prospectively collected, and paired maternal blood samples were also collected. Colostrum samples were tested with rRT-PCR-SARS-CoV-2, and skimmed acellular milk and maternal sera were tested against SARS-CoV-2 specific immunoglobulin M, A, and G reactive to receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein 1 to determine the presence of immunoglobulins. Then, we examined how each immunoglobulin type in the colostrum was related to the time of infection by logistic regression analysis, the concordance between these immunoglobulins in the colostrum, maternal serum, and mature milk by Cohen's kappa statistic, and the relationship between immunoglobulin levels in mature milk and colostrum with McNemar. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-seven pregnant women with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy or childbirth were recruited and donated the milk and blood samples. No SARS-CoV-2 was found in the human breast milk. Immunoglobulin A, G, and M were present in 129/162 (79·6%), 5/163 (3·1%), and 15/76 (19·7%) colostrum samples and in 17/62 (27·42%), 2/62 (3·23%) and 2/62 (3·23%) mature milk samples, respectively. Immunoglobulin A was the predominant immunoglobulin found in breast milk, and its levels were significantly higher in the colostrum than in the mature milk (p-value < 0.001). We did not find that the presence of immunoglobulins in the colostrum was associated with their presence in maternal, the severity of the disease, or the time when the infection had occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Since anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies are found in the colostrum irrespective of the time of infection during pregnancy, but the virus itself is not detected in human breast milk, our study found no indications to withhold breastfeeding, taking contact precautions when there is active disease.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus , Humanos , Feminino , Gravidez , Leite Humano/química , Aleitamento Materno , Estudos Prospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Anticorpos Antivirais/análise , Imunoglobulina A/análise
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 13(1)2024 01 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38232983

RESUMO

While breastfeeding has long been an important, globally recognized aspect of population health, disparities exist across Canada. The Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) is a WHO/UNICEF best-practice program that helps ensure families receive evidence-based perinatal care and is associated with improved breastfeeding rates. However, <10% of hospitals in Canada are designated as 'Baby-Friendly'.The Breastfeeding Committee for Canada (BCC) aimed to increase the number of hospitals that moved towards BFI designation by implementing a National BFI Quality Improvement Collaborative Project. Key activities included (1) implementing and evaluating the BFI Project with 25 hospital teams across Canada and (2) making recommendations for scaling up BFI in Canada.As of December 2023, three hospitals in the BFI Project have attained designation and six have started the official process towards designation with the BCC. Breastfeeding initiation rates remained high and stable (>80%); however, breastfeeding exclusivity rates did not meet targets. All BFI care indicators improved across participating facilities. All skin-to-skin indicators improved, with rates of immediate and sustained skin-to-skin meeting targets of >80% for vaginal births. BFI care indicators of documented assistance and support with breastfeeding within 6 hours of birth, rooming-in and education about community supports also met target levels. Leadership buy-in, parent partner engagement and collaborative activities of workshops, webinars and mentoring with BFI Project leadership were viewed as valuable.This BFI Project demonstrated that hospitals could successfully implement Baby-Friendly practices in various Canadian settings despite challenges introduced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Indicators collected as part of this work demonstrate that delivery of Baby-Friendly care improved in participating facilities. Sustainability and scaling up BFI implementation in both hospitals and community health services across Canada through implementation of a BFI Coach Mentor Program is ongoing to enable continued progress and impact on breastfeeding and maternal-child health.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , Melhoria de Qualidade , Feminino , Gravidez , Criança , Humanos , Canadá , Saúde da Criança , Pandemias , Promoção da Saúde/métodos
9.
Health Promot J Austr ; 35(1): 242-250, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37076784

RESUMO

ISSUE ADDRESSED: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen evidence and advice evolve quickly. Since the start of the pandemic there has been confusion and concern about breastfeeding and COVID-19, and advice for this group has at times been contradictory. The volume of information on social media has exacerbated this. This study aimed to understand breastfeeding-related COVID-19 information sharing on social media during the global and Australian vaccine roll-out. METHODS: The CrowdTangle platform was used to source data from December 2020 to December 2021. Posts were categorised to intent and source and mapped to a timeline of pandemic-related events and announcements. Descriptive analysis was used to understand data distribution patterns and qualitative analysis for post-intent. RESULTS: A total of 945 posts were included. Post-interactions ranged from 0 to 6500. Vaccine-related posts were the highest in number and increased over time. Non-profit organisations shared the highest number of posts (n = 241), but interactions were highest with personal and government accounts. Peaks in posts and interactions mapped to key pandemic-related announcements and events. CONCLUSION: These results describe the breastfeeding and COVID-19 related content shared on Facebook over 13 months, and the associated interactions. Breastfeeding is an important public health issue and breastfeeding women have experienced conflicting and confusing breastfeeding-related information during the COVID-19 pandemic. Better understanding of social media usage, and the monitoring of changes in usage, as an emergency unfolds, can help target communications. This article adds to the evidence in understanding user reactions to COVID-19 related breastfeeding information on social media. SO WHAT?: Social listening is an important part of health communication and infodemic management. Understanding how users react to and engage with COVID-19 related breastfeeding information on social media can help to understand how the general public perceives and responds to health advice and other information being shared.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Comunicação em Saúde , Mídias Sociais , Vacinas , Feminino , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Aleitamento Materno , Austrália , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos
11.
Infect Dis Now ; 54(1): 104831, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37952583

RESUMO

The World Health Organization strongly supports breastfeeding as the main source of infant feeding to ensure maternal and child health. Since its emergence, COVID-19 has become a disease affecting the health of the world's population, and vaccines have been developed to prevent it. However, the decision to license COVID-19 vaccines for infants under 6 months of age has been delayed. Different studies have shown that during the breastfeeding period, the benefit-risk balance is much higher in favor of the benefit, at the immunological level for the infant, due to its low perception of adverse effects and the low transmission of products such as mRNA from the mother to the child. Different organizations and societies recommend vaccination in breastfeeding women. COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , COVID-19 , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Vacinas contra COVID-19/uso terapêutico , Lactação , Vacinação
12.
Matern Child Health J ; 28(3): 513-523, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37924418

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted pregnant and breastfeeding women. Both low- and high-risk groups adopted preventive approaches such as mask-wearing and handwashing to slow down and prevent viral transmission during critical periods that may affect mother-child interactions. METHODS: A longitudinal observational study was conducted with primiparous women recruited using convenience sampling from the postpartum care ward of Afzalipour Teaching Hospital in Kerman from August 1, 2020 to March 30, 2021. The research questionnaires included demographic information, preventive behaviors, breastfeeding intention and practices, postpartum distress, and Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale. All the questionnaires were self-reported online in three stages: before discharge from the postpartum ward, the first month after delivery, and the third month after delivery. RESULTS: A Total of 160 primiparous women were included. The results showed significant changes in preventive behaviors and postpartum distress levels during the study. Breastfeeding intention and practices were negatively affected by postpartum distress (P = 0.034), unwanted pregnancies (P = 0.009), and cesarean delivery (P < 0.001). Postpartum distress was directly affected by the presence of depression (P < 0.001). Preventive behaviors at discharge were significantly associated with postpartum distress three months after delivery (P = 0.013). The study also found an association between women's and partner's education, unwanted pregnancy, and cesarean delivery that determined postpartum distress. CONCLUSIONS: Pandemic restrictions did not affect breastfeeding intentions or practices, possibly due to sufficient social and family support during the pandemic. However, robust guidelines are required to increase enable women's access to specializede care to cope with future pandemics, particularly during the first few weeks after childbirth.


Assuntos
Depressão Pós-Parto , Pandemias , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Aleitamento Materno , Intenção , Período Pós-Parto , Estudos Longitudinais , Depressão Pós-Parto/epidemiologia
13.
J Perinatol ; 44(1): 12-19, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37495712

RESUMO

The Coronavirus pandemic has affected millions of people due to the spread of the Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Pregnant individuals and infants are most vulnerable given the increased risk of developing severe complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recently, COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for pregnant women and infants starting at 6 months of age to prevent disease contraction and minimize disease severity. We conducted a review of the literature on COVID-19 vaccination to discuss vaccine safety and efficacy, immunity after maternal vaccination, transplacental transfer and persistence of antibodies, and public health implications. Current evidence supports the safety and efficacy of vaccination during pregnancy. Maternal vaccination provides greater antibody persistence in infants compared to immunity from natural infection. Furthermore, vaccination has demonstrated an increased rate of passive antibody transfer through the placenta and breast milk. Public health interventions are important in achieving herd immunity and ultimately ending the pandemic. IMPACT: This article highlights the benefits of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy with a review of the data describing safety and efficacy, passive and active immunity after maternal immunization, trans-placental transfer and persistence of protective antibodies, and public health implications. With this information, healthcare providers can provide up-to-date knowledge to their pregnant patients to help them form an informed decision on vaccination and combat vaccine hesitancy.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Gravidez , Lactente , Feminino , Humanos , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Placenta , SARS-CoV-2 , Vacinação , Leite Humano
14.
Acta Paediatr ; 113(3): 495-502, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38112114

RESUMO

AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the duration of mother's own milk (MOM) provision to preterm very low-birth weight (VLBW, <1500 g) infants during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesised that COVID-19 restrictions would reduce the duration of MOM provision. METHODS: This retrospective study compared VLBW infants born at the Berlin university hospital during the pandemic (15 March 2020 to 14 March 2021, n = 108) with infants born in the pre-pandemic year (01 January 2019 to 31 January 2019, n = 121). We calculated the duration of MOM provision and analysed factors associated with its early cessation. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the rate of primiparous mothers increased from 29% to 44% while the distribution of all other parental and infants' characteristics remained similar. There were no differences in the median duration of MOM provision (47 vs. 51 days), feeding type (MOM 67% vs. 65%) and breastfeeding rates at discharge (exclusive, 8% vs. 13%; partial 69% vs. 60%). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed smoking during pregnancy and parental school education consistently as independent risk factors for early cessation of MOM provision. CONCLUSION: Supply of MOM for VLBW infants can be upheld also during pandemic restrictions.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Leite Humano , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Recém-Nascido de muito Baixo Peso , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal , Mães , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos
15.
Salud Publica Mex ; 65(4, jul-ago): 370-376, 2023 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38060897

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceptions, knowledge, and practices of breastfeeding in the context of Covid-19 of pregnant and postpartum women, midwives, and health providers in an indigenous region of Chiapas, Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Qualitative thematic analysis study involving semi-structured interviews (n = 46) with pregnant women (n = 19), postpartum women (n = 6), health providers (n = 10, i.e., doctors/nurses), and midwives (n = 11). RESULTS: Among mothers, 47% (n = 11) did not know if Covid-19 is transmitted through breastfeeding. They mentioned that they would stay away from their newborns if infected. Health providers and midwives have not received education or any supporting material on the value of breastfeeding during Covid-19 infection. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding mothers' promotion and counseling remain poor in indigenous communities and have worsened during the Covid-19 pandemic. Breastfeeding training among health providers and midwives should be provided or strengthened even more in emergency situations.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Feminino , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , México/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Gestantes , Mães
16.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 645, 2023 12 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38049771

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Antenatal Education equips parents with knowledge for safe maternal health and infant care. It also reduces fear and anxiety during childbirth. ANE curriculum can vary according to country and institute. It can include classes focusing on childbirth, pain relief techniques, mode of birth, parenting, breastfeeding, breathing techniques, etc. Although ANE is widely practiced in developed countries, there is no standard program in developing countries like Pakistan. This study aims to improve antenatal education at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan potentially proposing an upgraded curriculum as a national standard. METHODS: This multiphase study used mix-method design was conducted in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of a tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan from 2019 to 2021. Phase 1 of the study included reviewing and comparing the hospital's antenatal curriculum with existing literature, followed by Phase 2, which was a desk review of attendance and patient feedback. The 3rd phase involved IDIs (in depth interviews) from health care workers (Obstetrics experts) to understand their perspectives regarding the ANE and the conducted classes. For phase one, gaps were identified and reported theoretically. For phase two, the annual attendance was recorded and participants' satisfaction with the classes assessed. Qualitative data from phase 2 and 3 was converted into themes and sub-themes. RESULTS: The audit showed a decline in the attendance of antenatal classes due to the pandemic and consequent shift to online sessions. The low attendance in online courses could be attributed to various factors. Patient feedback was generally positive, with a majority expressing high satisfaction levels. Expert feedback highlighted the need for additional topics such as mental health and COVID in pregnancy, as well as fathers' involvement. The curriculum was updated to include these topics and made more interactive with printed handouts for parents. CONCLUSION: A standardized antenatal education covering various topics surrounding pregnancy, childbirth, and postnatal care must be available to parents nationwide.


Assuntos
Educação Pré-Natal , Lactente , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Educação Pré-Natal/métodos , Paquistão , Poder Familiar/psicologia , Saúde Mental , Aleitamento Materno , Cuidado Pré-Natal/métodos
17.
Int Breastfeed J ; 18(1): 65, 2023 Dec 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38049908

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Given the limited availability of research on the association between COVID-19 infection and breastfeeding success, the primary objective of this study is to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this relationship. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 260 women who were on the postnatal ward of an academic hospital affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences during the COVID-19 pandemic (between March and August 2021). Among these women, 130 had tested positive for COVID-19 in pregnancy, while the remaining 130 were considered healthy. The study aimed to assess various factors, including sociodemographic characteristics and the results of four validated questionnaires: The Bristol Breastfeeding Questionnaire, The Multidimensional of Perceived Social Support (MPSS), The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES), and The Postpartum Partner Support Scale (PPSS). These questionnaires were administered to each participant to gather relevant data. After eight weeks, a telephone follow-up was carried out to assess the success of breastfeeding. The evaluation focused on determining if exclusive breastfeeding was maintained or not. Data was collected by questioning mothers about their infants' feeding habits in the past 24 h. Exclusive breastfeeding refers to the exclusive use of breast milk without the introduction of other liquids or solid foods. RESULTS: Women with a previous COVID-19 infection (case group) had a lower mean infant gestational age (P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of cesarean section (P = 0.001) compared to the control group. The proportion of women who exclusively breastfed was higher in the control group (98.5%) than in women with a history of COVID-19 infection (89.2%) (P = 0.011). Furthermore, the case group reported lower scores in perceived social support and the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale, in contrast to the control group. Notably, there was a significant correlation between breastfeeding success and women's breastfeeding self-efficacy score. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study offer valuable insights for healthcare professionals, enabling them to promote early initiation of breastfeeding in mothers with a history of COVID-19 infection, while ensuring necessary precautions are taken.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Lactente , Humanos , Feminino , Gravidez , Estudos Prospectivos , Cesárea , Lactação , Pandemias , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Apoio Social
18.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 673, 2023 12 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38110927

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Worldwide exclusive breastfeeding is still recommended as a successful strategy even during the COVID -19 pandemic to lower infant morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and practices of exclusive breastfeeding among rural women during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at EL-Morabeen Family Medicine Center in rural Damietta, Egypt among 178 lactating women who were chosen by using the purposive sampling technique. A developed structured questionnaire consisting of four parts was used to gather data from March to May 2022. Univariate analysis for descriptive data and bivariate analysis through the chi-square test were performed. RESULTS: The current study revealed that 73% of the studied rural women did not receive any breastfeeding counseling during antenatal visits and 61.2% of them believed that coronavirus was transmitted through breastmilk. Only 15.2% of them breastfed their infant exclusively for 6 months, 88.2% of mothers delayed breastfeeding initiation after delivery and 48.3% administered the prelacteal feeds. A total of 98.3% of rural women had never made skin-to-skin contact, and 79.2% of them had not been vaccinated against COVID-19. Additionally, a statistically significant association between good knowledge and practice with highly educated women aged 26-30 years, with a monthly income of 4000-6000 L.E was found. Furthermore, only 26.4% and 26.1% of rural women had good knowledge and practice scores respectively. CONCLUSION: Suboptimal breastfeeding practices, such as delayed onset of breastfeeding, low percentages of exclusivity, early weaning, prelacteal feeding administration, and lack of skin-to-skin contact during the COVID -19 pandemic were prevalent among the studied rural mothers. Breastfeeding counseling for all pregnant women and implementation of evidence-based practices in the health care system, such as the early initiation of breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact, are recommended.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , COVID-19 , Lactente , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Estudos Transversais , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Egito/epidemiologia , Lactação , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Mães
19.
Breastfeed Med ; 18(12): 921-927, 2023 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38100437

RESUMO

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on breastfeeding, overall and across degrees of family vulnerability. Study Design: A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted based on record linkage analysis of regional administrative databases providing data on breastfeeding prevalence in children, collected at the time of months of age. Breastfeeding data were linked to maternal characteristics to calculate a breastfeeding vulnerability score. Data over a 3-year period were considered as follows: 2019 (prepandemic), 2020 (lockdown and strict COVID-19 control measures), and 2021 (milder COVID-19 control measures). Results: During the study period, 110,925 immunization records were registered; data on breastfeeding were available for 107,138 records. The prevalence of full breastfeeding at 3 months of age decreased from 57.1% in 2019 to 56.1% in 2021 (p-value = 0.003), whereas prevalence of full breastfeeding at 5 months of age increased (from 44.1% in 2019 to 47.6% in 2021; p-value <0.001). The vulnerability score was calculated for the 70,253 records (63.3% of the initial sample) for which data were accessible: 5% of the sample was in the lowest vulnerability class and 15% in the highest one. As the vulnerability score increased, the prevalence of full breastfeeding at 3 and 5 months of age decreased in each of the three study years. Breastfeeding prevalence within each vulnerability class was not affected by the pandemic. On the other hand, the percentage of children in the high vulnerability class (score ≥3) increased by 3.6% in 2021 compared with 2019. Conclusions: The pandemic has not significantly impacted the prevalence of breastfeeding (-1% at 3 months and +3.5% at 5 months), but the proportion of children in the most vulnerable class increased significantly: action should be taken to ensure that during crises or emergencies the most vulnerable groups receive increased breastfeeding protection, promotion, and support.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Feminino , Humanos , Aleitamento Materno , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Lactente
20.
Breastfeed Med ; 18(12): 943-950, 2023 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38100444

RESUMO

Objectives: To investigate SARS-CoV-2 specific immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in breast milk of Thai mothers post COVID-19 vaccination and/or SARS-CoV-2 infection, and to compare the sIgA among lactating mothers with varying COVID-19 vaccination regimes. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted in lactating mothers receiving ≥2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine or confirming SARS-CoV-2-positive test as a part of an infant feeding survey. Vaccination and infection details were collected through questionnaires and interviews. Self-collected breast milk samples (30 mL) at 1, 3, and 6 months postvaccination or infection were analyzed for sIgA through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Eighty-eight lactating mothers (152 milk samples), average age of 30.7 ± 6.2 years, were recruited. Fifty-five percent of milk samples were from lactating mothers with both SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination (hybrid immunity); 40% were from those with vaccination alone (COVID naïve). Sixty percent of lactating mothers received mixed types of vaccines. Median sIgA ratio in breast milk was 2.67 (0.82-7.85). Breast milk sIgA at 1, 3, and 6 months were higher in mothers with hybrid immunity than in COVID naïve (geometric mean [95% confidence interval]: 3.30 [2.06-5.29] versus 1.04 [0.52-2.04], 3.39 [2.24-5.13] versus 1.26 [0.77-2.06], 4.29 [3.04-6.06] versus 1.33 [0.74-2.42], respectively). No significant differences were observed among various vaccination regimes. Conclusion: sIgA against SARS-CoV-2 was detected in breast milk for up to 6 months after immunization together with infection at a greater level than after immunization or infection alone. This immunity could be transferred and protective against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Discontinuation of breastfeeding among mothers who received COVID vaccination or experienced infection should be discouraged. Clinical Trial Registration number: TCTR20220215012.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Leite Humano , Feminino , Lactente , Humanos , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , SARS-CoV-2 , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , Imunoglobulina A , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Lactação , Estudos Longitudinais , Aleitamento Materno , Vacinação , Mães , Imunoglobulina A Secretora
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