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1.
J Aging Stud ; 69: 101225, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834245

RESUMO

Drawing on qualitative data from a study of older adults' participation in a contemporary dance group, this paper asks what can be gained from new materialist concepts of the older body, and how they can expand cultural gerontological thinking about embodiment. This paper examines the connections between the older body, movement, thoughts, words and spaces, arguing that dance demonstrates that there is a spatial dimension to embodiment. In drawing from models of materiality emerging in gerontology, this paper provides insights about the experience of age, questioning fundamental categorizations promoted in Western culture, and re-thinks agency in relation to the body and space. Emphasising the importance of the material world in the production of the social has important implications in terms of understanding the experience of ageing within an ageist society.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Dança , Humanos , Dança/psicologia , Idoso , Envelhecimento/psicologia , Feminino , Masculino , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Etarismo/psicologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa
2.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0300837, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38870208

RESUMO

Recognizing postures in multi-person dance scenarios presents challenges due to mutual body part obstruction and varying distortions across different dance actions. These challenges include differences in proximity and size, demanding precision in capturing fine details to convey action expressiveness. Robustness in recognition becomes crucial in complex real-world environments. To tackle these issues, our study introduces a novel approach, i.e., Multi-Person Dance Tiered Posture Recognition with Cross Progressive Multi-Resolution Representation Integration (CPMRI) and Tiered Posture Recognition (TPR) modules. The CPMRI module seamlessly merges high-level features, rich in semantic information, with low-level features that provide precise spatial details. Leveraging a cross progressive approach, it retains semantic understanding while enhancing spatial precision, bolstering the network's feature representation capabilities. Through innovative feature concatenation techniques, it efficiently blends high-resolution and low-resolution features, forming a comprehensive multi-resolution representation. This approach significantly improves posture recognition robustness, especially in intricate dance postures involving scale variations. The TPR module classifies body key points into core torso joints and extremity joints based on distinct distortion characteristics. Employing a three-tier tiered network, it progressively refines posture recognition. By addressing the optimal matching problem between torso and extremity joints, the module ensures accurate connections, refining the precision of body key point locations. Experimental evaluations against state-of-the-art methods using MSCOCO2017 and a custom Chinese dance dataset validate our approach's effectiveness. Evaluation metrics including Object Keypoint Similarity (OKS)-based Average Precision (AP), mean Average Precision (mAP), and Average Recall (AR) underscore the efficacy of the proposed method.


Assuntos
Dança , Postura , Humanos , Postura/fisiologia , Dança/fisiologia , Algoritmos , Reconhecimento Automatizado de Padrão/métodos
3.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 39: 142-155, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38876619

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: There is growing research evidence on bodily discourses and body image issues of women with disabilities. Within the art-based intervention repertoire for persons with disabilities, dance and movement-based therapies and interventions are gaining prominence. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dance sessions (delivered online) on body image, body satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and wellbeing of women with disabilities. METHOD: A quasi-experimental waitlist control design study was conducted with data collected at two time points: baseline or pre-test and five-months later or post-test. Outcomes were measured using the Body Image Scale and the WHO-5-Wellbeing Index. RESULTS: The dance sessions were effective (Hedges' g = -0.56 -0.88; p < 0.01) and post-test body dissatisfaction scores were lower and wellbeing scores were higher for participants with a college degree or postgraduate degree, self-employed or students, and whose intervention compliance was above threshold (>50% dance sessions attended and corresponding homework sessions completed). Tobit regression models indicated that it was possible to estimate post-test outcomes due to dance sessions alone, controlling for significant socio-demographics. DISCUSSION: The domain knowledge of non-pharmacological art-based interventions for persons with disabilities, particularly women, is supported. CONCLUSIONS: Findings commend dance sessions as effective psychotherapeutic mechanisms to mitigate body dissatisfaction, improve body image and wellbeing of women with disabilities. Future research may focus on large-scale cross-sectional trials, variations in the repertoire for women with different disability types and histories, and qualitative narratives.


Assuntos
Imagem Corporal , Dançaterapia , Pessoas com Deficiência , Humanos , Feminino , Imagem Corporal/psicologia , Adulto , Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Dançaterapia/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem , Satisfação Pessoal , Dança/fisiologia , Dança/psicologia , Insatisfação Corporal/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Adolescente
4.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 39: 594-597, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38876692

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The 'Fit to Dance?' survey has been used in a number of studies to understand the health and wellbeing of dancers. These data have not been collected in Brazil as there is no validated questionnaire available in Brazilian Portuguese, culturally validated in Brazil with a scope as broad and comprehensive as that of 'Fit to Dance?'. OBJECTIVE: Translate into Brazilian Portuguese and culturally validate the questionnaire 'Fit to Dance?' in Brazil. METHODS: This was a validity and reliability study of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the 'Fit to Dance?' SURVEY: The stages of the research were: translation into the target language (Brazilian Portuguese), translation synthesis, translation validation and cross-cultural adaptation by a committee of experts in Dance Medicine and Science (DMS), reverse translation into English, pilot study (test/retest), and final version of the questionnaire. RESULTS: The questionnaire was applied to 21 dancers of different dance genres, with an age average of 25 ± 7.0 years. Cronbach's alpha (0.705), ICC (0.984) and Kappa (0.794) results reached adequate values. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian Portuguese version of the questionnaire 'Fit to Dance?' is effective, has adequate levels of validity and reliability, and can be used to report injuries and aspects of health and well-being of Brazilian dancers.


Assuntos
Comparação Transcultural , Dança , Traduções , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Brasil , Adulto , Feminino , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Masculino , Adulto Jovem , Psicometria/normas , Idioma
5.
Eur J Sport Sci ; 24(6): 637-652, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38874993

RESUMO

To assess the evidence for the effect of strength and conditioning on physical qualities and aesthetic competence in dance populations, three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus) were searched (until September 2022) for studies that met the following criteria: (i) dancers aged >16 years; (ii) structured strength and conditioning intervention; and (iii) with physical qualities and aesthetic competence as outcome measures. Methodological quality and risk of bias of the included studies were assessed through the systematic review tool "QualSyst". Meta-analyses of effect sizes (Hedges' g) with forest plots explored the effects of the strength and conditioning interventions. Thirty-six studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Meta-analysis indicated strength and conditioning significantly (p < 0.05) improved lower body power (g = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.53-1.27), upper body strength (g = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.39-1.57), lower body strength (g = 1.59, 95% CI: 0.97-2.22), and flexibility (g = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.05-1.66). Strength and conditioning interventions were found to be effective at improving physical qualities in dancers, recommending their participation in additional sessions to enhance overall fitness and ultimately dance performance. It is recommended that future strength and conditioning intervention research should include sample size calculations, with participants recruited from a specific dance genre and skill level in order to evaluate how strength and conditioning influences dance performance.


Assuntos
Dança , Força Muscular , Treinamento Resistido , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Estética
6.
J Int Soc Sports Nutr ; 21(1): 2369613, 2024 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38904148

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite the high risk of eating disorder (ED)-related attitudes and behaviors among female dancers, targeted scientific dietary regimens are currently inadequate. Time-restricted eating (TRE), a popular intermittent fasting protocol, has been shown to be effective in enhancing body composition and exercise performance in athletes. In this study, TRE was employed as a dietary regimen to improve body composition and exercise performance and address ED attitudes and behaviors in DanceSport dancers. METHODS: Twenty female DanceSport dancers were recruited and divided into two groups: TRE (n = 10) and normal diet (ND) (n = 10). The TRE group consumed their self-selected necessary energy intake exclusively between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. (utilizing a 16-hour fasting and 8-hour eating window) for 6 weeks, while the ND group maintained their regular dieting patterns. The consumption of water, black tea, or coffee without added sugar or milk was not restricted. Physical activity and calorie intake were systematically recorded during the TRE intervention. Body composition, aerobic and anaerobic performance, and ED attitudes and behaviors were assessed before and after the TRE intervention. The trial was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry under the identifier ChiCTR2200063780. RESULTS: The fixed effects tests (p < 0.0001) and estimates for the intercept (p < 0.0001) of hunger level indicated a noticeable effect on the initial state of hunger during TRE. No significant differences were observed in ED attitudes or behaviors (p > 0.05). TRE resulted in a reduction in hip circumference (p = 0.039), fat mass (kg) (p = 0.0004), and body fat percentage (p = 0.0005), with no significant decrease in fat-free mass (p > 0.05). No significant improvement was observed in aerobic performance (p > 0.05). The average power (AP) (p = 0.01) and AP/Body weight ratio (p = 0.003) significantly increased. Additionally, the power drop decreased significantly (p = 0.019). Group-by-time interactions were observed for fat mass (kg) (p = 0.01), body fat percentage (p = 0.035), and AP/Body weight (p = 0.020). CONCLUSION: TRE can be considered a feasible nutritional strategy for DanceSport dancers, facilitating improvements in body composition without compromising aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance or exacerbating ED attitudes and behaviors. Moreover, TRE may facilitate more favorable physiological adaptations, potentially contributing to improved exercise performance.


Assuntos
Composição Corporal , Dança , Jejum , Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos , Humanos , Feminino , Dança/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem , Ingestão de Energia , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Fenômenos Fisiológicos da Nutrição Esportiva , Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Adulto , Adolescente
8.
Med Probl Perform Art ; 39(2): 64-71, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38814125

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Ballet dancers are expected to use their bodies symmetrically during training, because dance movements are performed on both sides. However, there is a general belief that ballet training encourages the use of one side of the body more than the other. Frequent repetition of a particular exercise can lead to body asymmetries and musculoskeletal injuries. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the presence of lower limbs and trunk muscle strength asymmetries in ballet dancers and secondly to assess whether there is a difference between professional dancers and ballet students. METHODS: Ballet students (n=19) and professional ballet dancers (n=23) performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the trunk (flexion, extension, lateral flexion), hip (flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, external and internal rotation), knee (flexion, extension) and ankle (flexion, extension) on isometric dynamometer. RESULTS: The results showed that the percentage of ballet dancers with contralateral muscle strength asymmetries >10% ranged from 22.5% (ballet students) to 31.6% (professional dancers). The percentage of ballet dancers deviating by >10% from the normative maximum torque agonist/antagonist ratio ranged from 56.5% to 100%. A statistically significant difference between ballet students and professional ballet dancers was found in the trunk flexion/extension ratio (t(40) = -3 .55; p = 0.001; d = 0.55). CONCLUSION: This study revealed strength asymmetries in the lower limbs and trunk in ballet dancers, both professionals and students. Further research is needed to develop appropriate complementary exercise to address and eliminate asymmetries in muscle strength in ballet dancers.


Assuntos
Dança , Contração Isométrica , Extremidade Inferior , Força Muscular , Músculo Esquelético , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Adulto Jovem , Masculino , Extremidade Inferior/fisiologia , Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia , Contração Isométrica/fisiologia , Tronco/fisiologia , Adulto , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia
9.
Med Probl Perform Art ; 39(2): 93-107, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38814128

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Ballet dancers have a high injury risk. We aimed to gain insight into the causes for acute and overuse injuries in ballet dancers and the level of implementation of injury prevention by ballet teachers/masters, as perceived by dancers. METHODS: An international cross-sectional online-survey was based on the Fit-to-Dance Questionnaire and literature. Adult amateur, pre-professional, and professional ballet dancers reported the perceived causes of their injuries sustained in the previous 2 years. Multiple answers per injury were possible. Also, dancers rated the level of implementation of measures to prevent injury by their ballet teachers and ballet masters based on 21 items using a 5-point Likert scale. Causes were analyzed per-injury as well as per-dancer. RESULTS: 188 ballet ensembles and 51 dance organizations were contacted, from which 192 ballet dancers (mean age 27 ±7.8 yrs, 83% females) responded. 119 dancers (62%) reported 203 acute and 164 (85%) reported 469 overuse injuries. Fatigue was the most frequently perceived cause for acute injuries in the per-injury (n=89, 43.8%) and per-dancer analysis (n=63, 32.8%). For overuse injuries, pressure from the teacher/master was most frequently perceived as cause in the per-injury analysis (n=240, 51.2%), specifically in pre-/professional dancers (n=233, 61.3%). In the per-dancer analysis, fatigue/overtraining scored highest for overuse injuries (n=107; 55.7%). Other causes were previous/repetitive injuries (acute-per-injury 26.1%, acute-per-dancer 22.4%; overuse-per-injury 46.3%, overuse-per-dancer 53.1%) or erroneous dance technique (acute-per-injury 24.6%, acute-per-dancer 21.9%; overuse-per-injury 47.8%, overuse-per-dancer 45.3%). With regard to perceived level of implementation of injury preventive measures by ballet teachers/masters to prevent musculoskeletal injuries, 2 items received high ratings, 12 moderate ratings and 6 low ratings. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue and pressure accounted for the majority of perceived causes for injuries. Perceived support by ballet teachers/masters regarding injury prevention was moderate to low. Future research should focus on the awareness, attitudes, and the important role of ballet teachers/masters for injury prevention in dancers.


Assuntos
Transtornos Traumáticos Cumulativos , Dança , Humanos , Dança/lesões , Feminino , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Adulto , Transtornos Traumáticos Cumulativos/prevenção & controle , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/prevenção & controle
10.
Age Ageing ; 53(5)2024 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38776214

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Fall prevention is a global health priority. Strength and balance exercise programmes are effective at reducing falls. Emerging literature suggests dance is an enjoyable and sociable form of exercise. However, there is little evidence that dance reduces fall incidence. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis examining effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dance for falls prevention in older adults. Five databases were searched with no restrictions on publication date or intervention settings. Risk of bias was assessed using variants of Cochrane Risk of bias tools, Mixed-Methods Appraisal and Drummond checklist as appropriate. Certainty of evidence was assessed using GRADE. RESULTS: Forty-one studies were included (19 RCTs, 13 quasi-experimental, two mixed-method, seven observational studies, 2,451 participants). Five types of dance interventions were identified: ballroom and Latin dance, dance exercise, cultural dance, dance therapy, and low-impact dance. Meta-analysis was only possible for functional outcome measures: Timed-Up-and-Go (dance versus usual care, mean difference (MD) = 1.36; 95% CI -3.57 to 0.85), Sit-to-Stand (dance versus exercise MD = -0.85; 95% CI -2.64 to 0.93: dance versus education MD = -1.64; 95% CI -4.12 to 0.85), Berg Balance Scale (dance versus usual care MD = 0.61; 95% CI -4.26 to 5.47). There was unexplained variance in effects and no significant differences between intervention and control groups. Overall, certainty of evidence was very low; we are uncertain about the effect of dance interventions in reducing falls. CONCLUSIONS: There is very low certainty evidence for dance as an alternative to strength and balance training if the aim is to prevent falls. No robust evidence on the cost-effectiveness of dance interventions for the prevention of falls was found. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42022382908.


Assuntos
Acidentes por Quedas , Análise Custo-Benefício , Dançaterapia , Dança , Humanos , Acidentes por Quedas/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Dançaterapia/métodos , Masculino , Feminino , Equilíbrio Postural , Resultado do Tratamento , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Etários , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
11.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10909, 2024 05 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38740903

RESUMO

To improve the recognition effect of the folk dance image recognition model and put forward new suggestions for teachers' teaching strategies, this study introduces a Deep Neural Network (DNN) to optimize the folk dance training image recognition model. Moreover, a corresponding teaching strategy optimization scheme is proposed according to the experimental results. Firstly, the image preprocessing and feature extraction of DNN are optimized. Secondly, classification and target detection models are established to analyze the folk dance training images, and the C-dance dataset is used for experiments. Finally, the results are compared with those of the Naive Bayes classifier, K-nearest neighbor, decision tree classifier, support vector machine, and logistic regression models. The results of this study provide new suggestions for teaching strategies. The research results indicate that the optimized classification model shows a significant improvement in classification accuracy across various aspects such as action complexity, dance types, movement speed, dance styles, body dynamics, and rhythm. The accuracy, precision, recall, and F1 scores have increased by approximately 14.7, 11.8, 13.2, and 17.4%, respectively. In the study of factors such as different training images, changes in perspective, lighting conditions, and noise interference, the optimized model demonstrates a substantial enhancement in recognition accuracy and robustness. These findings suggest that, compared to traditional models, the optimized model performs better in identifying various dances and movements, enhancing the accuracy and stability of classification. Based on the experimental results, strategies for optimizing the real-time feedback and assessment mechanism in folk dance teaching, as well as the design of personalized learning paths, are proposed. Therefore, this study holds the potential to be applied in the field of folk dance, promoting the development and innovation of folk dance education.


Assuntos
Dança , Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador , Redes Neurais de Computação , Humanos , Processamento de Imagem Assistida por Computador/métodos , Aprendizado Profundo , Ensino
12.
BMC Geriatr ; 24(1): 392, 2024 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38698317

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies show that in-person dance training is a beneficial form of physical activity that involves mental, social, and physical dimensions. This exploratory study investigated the benefits of a 12-week online dance training intervention on mental and physical health outcomes for older women. METHODS: A convergent parallel mixed-method design was used. Forty-five older adults (74.0 ± 5.3 yrs old, 44 women) were recruited through advertisements at activity and rehabilitation centers in the North Denmark region. The intervention consisted of two weekly 60-min classes of improvisation and salsa delivered online through video call applications. Changes in physical health outcomes (body mass and composition, resting blood pressure, Senior Fitness Test battery) and self-rated health and wellbeing (health-related quality of life (HRQOL), feelings of loneliness) were assessed prior to and after 12 weeks of dancing. Focus group interviews were conducted post-intervention to further explore the benefits as well as the participant's experience of the intervention. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants (all women) completed the study. Significant improvements in fitness were found for the number of arm curls performed (baseline: 12.3 ± 3.0; post-intervention: 13.7 ± 3.0, P = 0.005), 2-min step test performance (baseline: 66.5 ± 20.0 reps.; post-intervention: 73.8 ± 22.6 reps., P = 0.016), and chair sit-and-reach (baseline: 0.4 ± 11.3 cm; post-intervention: 5.5 ± 10.1 cm, P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in body mass from baseline to post-intervention (P < 0.015). The themes from the focus groups included (1) Participation, (2) Challenges, (3) Progression, (4) Motivation, (5) Perceived health and wellbeing, and (6) Online dance instruction. No significant changes were reported in HRQOL and loneliness from the quantitative data, although the qualitative data did reveal improved feelings of physical health and wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention improved several aspects of fitness in older women and improved the participants' perceptions of their own physical abilities and wellbeing. While most participants found the online intervention enjoyable, several participants missed the feedback from the instructors that naturally occurs with in-person instruction.


Assuntos
Dança , Saúde Mental , Humanos , Feminino , Idoso , Dança/psicologia , Dança/fisiologia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Aptidão Física/fisiologia , Aptidão Física/psicologia , Internet , Dançaterapia/métodos , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia
13.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303070, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38809842

RESUMO

Tap dance generates forces and joint motions that can lead to injury; however, little is known about the magnitude of load across different tap steps. The purpose of this study was to calculate peak vertical forces, average vertical foot velocities, and maximum/minimum ankle angles produced by tap dancers with different levels of experience performing the toe cannon, heel cannon, flap, and cramp roll. This prospective cross-sectional study included 14 female tap dancers aged ≥18 years with varying tap experience. Participants were recorded by three cameras while performing a choreographed tap combination containing four steps of interest on a force platform. Adjusting for experience and dancer-level clustering, we identified the steps-cramp roll and toe cannon-that had the highest peak vertical ground reaction force, angles, and velocities compared to flap and heel cannon. There was no effect of experience. The results supported our hypothesis and provide new insights into step production. Over time, the larger forces associated with these steps could pose an increased risk of injury to bones and joints when compared to smaller forces, which may suggest the importance of adjusting routines to reduce or avoid injury.


Assuntos
Articulação do Tornozelo , Dança , Humanos , Feminino , Dança/fisiologia , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Articulação do Tornozelo/fisiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Suporte de Carga/fisiologia , Tornozelo/fisiologia , Adolescente
14.
Med Probl Perform Art ; 39(2): 108-118, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38814129

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Pole dancing is an extreme form of performance physical activity, combining considerable feats of muscular strength, flexibility, dancing and acrobatics on a vertical metal apparatus. Despite rapid growth in the artform, many pole dancers continue to participate without fulfilling physical requirements to withstand the forces and physicality required. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the incidence, prevalence and characteristics of injuries sustained by pole dancing participants reported in published studies. METHODS: Five databases were comprehensively searched in February 2023. Authors independently screened titles and abstracts, with full copies of eligible studies reviewed using specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Studies were included if they referenced pole dancing, were in English language and Level I-III-3 in accordance with the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, with case reports considered if included 10 or more participants. The National Institute of Health quality assessment tool for observational cohort and cross-sectional studies was used to review the quality of reporting of selected studies. RESULTS: Eleven articles were retrieved based on searches, with five studies meeting full inclusion/exclusion criteria, published between 2020-2022. In total 787 study participants were identified, with 623 sustaining a total of 1,803 pole dancing injuries. Data from all studies in injury profiles reported 42.4% of injuries sustained to the upper limb, 44.8% lower limb, 10.5% trunk, 0.02% associated with the head and neck, and several injuries affecting multiple regions. Acute injuries comprised 51.6% of reported injuries compared to 48.4% chronic. Injury characteristics were varied due to inconsistencies in reporting across studies. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review highlights a paucity of knowledge regarding injuries in pole dancing, perhaps expected with a relatively young sport. Improvement in reporting is required to aid in identification of injuries and opportunities for development of injury risk reduction strategies. PROSPERO Registration no. CRD42023401012.


Assuntos
Dança , Humanos , Dança/lesões , Prevalência , Incidência , Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia
15.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10405, 2024 05 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38710809

RESUMO

As the most popular sport among middle-aged and elderly women in China, square dancing has both physical and psychological benefits for menopausal women. Previous studies have shown that square dance exercises can promote the physical health of older women, but there is a lack of research on the influence of middle-aged and elderly women on mental health and mediating variables. Therefore, this study starts with one of the important indicators of mental health-positive affects, aiming to explore the impact of square dance on the positive emotions of elderly women and further explore the mediating mechanisms involved. We send out The Physical Activity Rating Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, and the Satisfaction With Life Scale to a total of 2311 middle-aged and elderly women. SPSS 23 software and PROCESS were used to perform regression analysis and establish mediation models. Modeling results show square dance exercises could positively predict positive affect through the chain mediating effect of psychological resilience and life satisfaction. The results of this study are of great significance for promoting the extensive participation of middle-aged and elderly women in sports and protecting their mental health.


Assuntos
Dança , Saúde Mental , Satisfação Pessoal , Humanos , Feminino , Dança/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Envelhecimento/psicologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , China , Resiliência Psicológica , Qualidade de Vida , Bem-Estar Psicológico
16.
Eval Program Plann ; 104: 102430, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581972

RESUMO

Dance programs for people living with Parkinson's disease (PwPD) offer participants an opportunity to exercise, engage in artistic self-expression, and form new relationships. While it is understood that the social dimension of dance programs for PwPD contributes to dancer satisfaction and program sustainability, the social mechanisms instrumental to program success are under-examined. Engaging with theory from wider disciplines, or "theory knitting" can help program designers and evaluators examine the mechanisms and contextual factors that make classes socially meaningful with greater detail and specificity. This study identified and examined three theoretical frameworks that program planners and evaluators could use to conceptualize social engagement in dance for PwPD contexts and inform practice. Each theory was assessed for fit using the T-CaST theory comparison and selection tool developed by Birken et al. (2018). As an example, we used anthropologist Victor Turner's (1970; 1977) theory of liminality and communitas to identify five key areas for fostering a sense of social connection in dance for PwPD contexts: (1) selecting a meaningful dance space (2) creating a joyous atmosphere (3) marking entrance into the liminal time and space with rituals (4) embodying liminality and anti-structure and (5) inverting power relations and embracing fluid roles.


Assuntos
Dança , Doença de Parkinson , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Humanos , Doença de Parkinson/psicologia , Dança/psicologia , Dançaterapia/métodos , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Exercício Físico/psicologia
17.
Sportverletz Sportschaden ; 38(2): 79-88, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38663438

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During their training, pre-professional ballet students are confronted with physical stresses comparable to those of competitive sports. In competitive sports, there are mandatory and binding aptitude tests to ensure that the growing athlete meets the requirements. In ballet, there are no such mandatory examinations preceding the start of training. For adult professional dancers, musculoskeletal ideals could be isolated from the dance medicine literature. However, only a few studies describe musculoskeletal characteristics of pre-professional ballet students. It is neither known at what age a student should meet the ideal measurements for an adult nor what deviations from the ideal can be considered normal. This study aims to describe sociodemographic and musculoskeletal characteristics of pre-professional ballet students and discusses to what extent they already meet or deviate from dance-specific eligibility criteria for adult professional ballet dancers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study, n = 414 female and n = 192 male students of John Cranko School (JCS) were seen by an experienced orthopaedist and dance physician. Mean age was 13.9 years (SD 3.5, range 5-22 years). Their medical history was taken (age; nationality; start of ballet/training) and a physical examination was performed (height/weight; symmetry of shoulder girdle, spine, waist triangles; pelvic tilt; tibial torsion; range of motion of base of index finger joint, spine, hips, ankle and base of great toe joint). Subsequently, the results of this study were compared with suitability criteria for adult professional ballet dancers that had been isolated from the dance medicine literature for a previous article. RESULTS: Examinees were from 49 different nations. 34.6% of the female subjects (≥16 years) were between 165 and 170 cm and 33.3% of the male subjects (≥18 years) were between 178 and 185 cm tall. 45.0% of those examined showed low body weight (<10th percentile, BMI <18.5 kg/m²). The trunk of 61.0-84.8% of those examined was erect and symmetrical. 25.2% had scoliosis. Half (53.5%) were found to have a bilateral external rotation of the hips of at least 60°, and 68.7% had a bilateral internal rotation between 20 and 50°. 87.3% exhibited a bilateral tibial torsion between 15 and 40°. A bilateral en dehors of 90° was calculated for 25.0%. In 9.1% of those examined, the upper ankle joints presented a dorsiflexion of at least 25°, and in 70.2%, a plantarflexion of at least 70° was seen. In 88.0%, the metatarsophalangeal joint of the great toe was 90° (f) and 80° (m) on both sides. CONCLUSION: The results of this study showed that pre-professional ballet students fulfil many characteristics of adult professional ballet dancers. High values already among young age groups suggest a ballet-specific selection. Nevertheless, not all students fulfil the theoretical "ideal measurements" for professional classical ballet. These anatomical limits should be considered individually in training to protect the growing pre-professional ballet dancer. The high ballet-specific anatomical demands, but especially the large number of students with a low body weight, underline the necessity of mandatory aptitude tests at the beginning and regular check-ups in the course of training to avert compensatory mechanisms and their consequential damage and to screen for eating disorders and disorders of eating behaviour.


Assuntos
Dança , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Masculino , Adolescente , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Alemanha , Criança , Educação Vocacional , Estudantes , Exame Físico
18.
J Biomech ; 168: 112119, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38669794

RESUMO

This study aimed to investigate the associations between peak plantarflexion ankle joint moments and vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) during jump landings, and static ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), three-dimensional ankle excursions, and lower extremity strength in professional ballet dancers. Twenty-seven professional ballet dancers volunteered to participate (men = 14, women = 13). Participants attended one data collection session to measure dorsiflexion ROM and isometric lower extremity strength. Two further sessions were used to establish ankle mechanics and vGRFs during countermovement jump landings in seven foot positions, via a seven-camera motion capture system and piezoelectric force platform. Two linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between the target variables and strength, dorsiflexion ROM, and ankle excursions. Dancer identification, sex, and foot position were entered as random effects. Model fit, when considered independent of random effects, was generally poor with the predictor variables explaining little of the variance of peak plantarflexion ankle joint moments (R2 = 0.02) or vGRF (R2 = 0.01). Model fit improved when random effects were considered (R2 = 0.65 & 0.34). Frontal plane ankle excursion was the only predictor variable with a significant negative association with peak plantarflexion ankle joint moments (p = .016), although coefficient estimates were small. Strength, static ankle dorsiflexion ROM, and three-dimensional ankle excursions are poor predictors of load experienced at a joint and system level in professional ballet dancers. Differences between individuals, sex, and foot position may be better indicators of the load experienced during jump landings.


Assuntos
Articulação do Tornozelo , Dança , Força Muscular , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Masculino , Feminino , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia , Articulação do Tornozelo/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Adulto , Extremidade Inferior/fisiologia , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Adulto Jovem , Suporte de Carga/fisiologia
19.
Atten Percept Psychophys ; 86(4): 1400-1416, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38557941

RESUMO

Music training is associated with better beat processing in the auditory modality. However, it is unknown how rhythmic training that emphasizes visual rhythms, such as dance training, might affect beat processing, nor whether training effects in general are modality specific. Here we examined how music and dance training interacted with modality during audiovisual integration and synchronization to auditory and visual isochronous sequences. In two experiments, musicians, dancers, and controls completed an audiovisual integration task and an audiovisual target-distractor synchronization task using dynamic visual stimuli (a bouncing figure). The groups performed similarly on the audiovisual integration tasks (Experiments 1 and 2). However, in the finger-tapping synchronization task (Experiment 1), musicians were more influenced by auditory distractors when synchronizing to visual sequences, while dancers were more influenced by visual distractors when synchronizing to auditory sequences. When participants synchronized with whole-body movements instead of finger-tapping (Experiment 2), all groups were more influenced by the visual distractor than the auditory distractor. Taken together, this study highlights how training is associated with audiovisual processing, and how different types of visual rhythmic stimuli and different movements alter beat perception and production outcome measures. Implications for the modality appropriateness hypothesis are discussed.


Assuntos
Atenção , Dança , Música , Desempenho Psicomotor , Humanos , Dança/psicologia , Feminino , Masculino , Adulto Jovem , Atenção/fisiologia , Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia , Adulto , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Percepção do Tempo , Prática Psicológica , Reconhecimento Visual de Modelos/fisiologia , Adolescente , Percepção Visual/fisiologia , Tempo de Reação
20.
Hum Mov Sci ; 95: 103211, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38583276

RESUMO

Consecutive longitudinal axis rotations are very common in dance, ranging from head spins in break dance to pirouettes in ballet. They pose a rather formidable perceptuomotor challenge - and hence form an interesting window into human motor behaviour - yet they have been scarcely studied. In the present study, we investigated dancers' dizziness and postural stability after consecutive rotations. Rotations were performed actively or undergone passively, either with or without the use of a spotting technique in such an order that all 24 ordering options were offered at least once and not more than twice. Thirty-four dancers trained in ballet and/or contemporary dance (aged 27.2 ± 5.1 years) with a mean dance experience of 14.2 ± 7.1 years actively performed 14 revolutions in passé or coupé positions with a short gesture leg "foot down" after each revolution. In addition, they were passively turned through 14 revolutions on a motor-driven rotating chair. Participants' centre-of-pressure (COP) displacement was measured on a force-plate before and after the rotations. Moreover, the dancers indicated their subjective feeling of dizziness on a scale from 0 to 20 directly after the rotations. Both the active and passive conditions were completed with and without the dancers spotting. As expected, dizziness was worse after rotations without the adoption of the spotting technique, both in active and passive rotations. However, the pre-post difference in COP area after active rotations was unaffected by spotting, whereas in the passive condition, spotting diminished this difference. Our results thus suggest that adopting the spotting technique is a useful tool for dizziness reduction in dancers who have to perform multiple rotations. Moreover, spotting appears most beneficial for postural stability when it involves less postural control challenges, such as when seated on a chair and occurs in situations with limited somatosensory feedback (e.g., from the cutaneous receptors in the feet). However, the unexpected finding that spotting did not help postural stability after active rotations needs to be investigated further in future studies, for example with a detailed analysis of whole-body kinematics and eye-tracking.


Assuntos
Dança , Tontura , Equilíbrio Postural , Humanos , Dança/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Tontura/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Adulto , Masculino , Rotação , Adulto Jovem , Fenômenos Biomecânicos/fisiologia
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