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1.
Am J Public Health ; 114(6): 548-549, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718334
3.
Sci Adv ; 10(18): eadm8680, 2024 May 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38701214

RESUMO

Gas and propane stoves emit nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution indoors, but the exposures of different U.S. demographic groups are unknown. We estimate NO2 exposure and health consequences using emissions and concentration measurements from >100 homes, a room-specific indoor air quality model, epidemiological risk parameters, and statistical sampling of housing characteristics and occupant behavior. Gas and propane stoves increase long-term NO2 exposure 4.0 parts per billion volume on average across the United States, 75% of the World Health Organization's exposure guideline. This increased exposure likely causes ~50,000 cases of current pediatric asthma from long-term NO2 exposure alone. Short-term NO2 exposure from typical gas stove use frequently exceeds both World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks. People living in residences <800 ft2 in size incur four times more long-term NO2 exposure than people in residences >3000 ft2 in size; American Indian/Alaska Native and Black and Hispanic/Latino households incur 60 and 20% more NO2 exposure, respectively, than the national average.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados , Dióxido de Nitrogênio , Propano , Dióxido de Nitrogênio/análise , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/análise , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Habitação , Culinária , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise
4.
Lancet ; 403(10438): 1723, 2024 May 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38704156
5.
Environ Health Perspect ; 132(5): 54001, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38717751

RESUMO

Few studies on these concurrent health risks account for individuals without housing, yet they often experience greater exposure than other people-along with exacerbation of existing health issues.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar , Temperatura Alta , Pessoas Mal Alojadas , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Temperatura Alta/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental , Habitação
6.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303439, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38739626

RESUMO

Young adults experiencing homelessness (YAEH) are faced with instabilities in many areas of their lives, including their living situation, employment, and income. Little is known about how the experience of instability in these different domains might be associated with substance use. Leveraging data collected on 276 YAEH in Los Angeles County, regression analyses examine associations between three distinct types of instability (housing, employment, income) and participants' self-reported alcohol use, alcohol consequences, non-cannabis drug use, and substance use symptoms. Results indicated that recent instability in income, employment, and secure housing for those with access to it (but not housing in general or non-secure housing) were significantly associated with greater alcohol/drug use or substance use symptoms. Depression was also found to moderate the association between employment instability and alcohol use. Our findings suggest that efforts to reduce instability in income, employment, and secure housing may have positive benefits for substance using YAEH, especially those with depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
Emprego , Habitação , Pessoas Mal Alojadas , Renda , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Humanos , Pessoas Mal Alojadas/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas Mal Alojadas/psicologia , Masculino , Feminino , Emprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Depressão/epidemiologia , Los Angeles/epidemiologia , Adolescente
7.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303295, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38758751

RESUMO

This study addresses the satisfaction of housing-related needs in single-person households across European countries. The primary objective is to assess the housing satisfaction of single-person households in European countries, specifically within the Visegrad Group. The study seeks to identify trends in housing conditions, create a ranking of countries based on these conditions, and categorize countries with similar levels of unmet housing needs. The study employs statistical measures and methods to achieve its objectives. Time series are constructed for European countries, and linear trends are analyzed to identify statistically significant changes in selected housing aspects from 2005 to 2022. Various research tasks, including ranking countries and grouping them based on housing conditions, are accomplished using established methods like linear ranking and Ward's cluster analysis. Key findings include significant variations in financial burdens related to housing costs, thermal comfort, environmental pollution, and safety issues across European countries. The study reveals both improvements and challenges in housing conditions from 2005 to 2022 in one-person households. For instance, financial stress due to housing costs decreased in some countries, while thermal comfort issues improved in several nations. The results also highlight the heterogeneity within the Visegrad Group. The study concludes that there is a need for targeted actions to address housing-related issues in single-person households. The findings underscore the importance of investments in building energy efficiency, initiatives for affordable housing construction, and environmental policies. The research emphasizes the impact of housing conditions on health, well-being, and overall community life, urging policymakers to consider these factors for holistic improvement in the housing sector.


Assuntos
Características da Família , Habitação , Habitação/economia , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Satisfação Pessoal
8.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 21: E33, 2024 May 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38753527

RESUMO

Introduction: Homeownership is crucial for stability and healthy life. We examined the role of homeownership in predicting the prevalence of common chronic health conditions in the United States. Methods: We used 2020 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (N = 401,958) to assess the association between homeownership and self-reported diagnosed diabetes, asthma, cancer, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and kidney disease. We analyzed data by using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, education, employment, and income and computed odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% CIs. Results: Most survey participants (66.8%) owned their residences. Age, marital status, education, and income significantly influenced homeownership. Odds of homeownership progressively increased with age, reaching a peak at 17.45 (95% CI, 16.21-18.79) for adults aged 65 years or older, and non-Hispanic White adults had the highest odds (OR = 3.34; 95% CI, 3.18-3.52). Compared with renters, homeowners generally had lower prevalence of chronic health conditions, especially among those aged 45 to 64 years. After adjusting for age, sex, and race and ethnicity, the odds of having chronic health conditions among renters were higher than those of homeowners: CHD, 1.39 (1.27-1.52); diabetes, 1.27 (1.20-1.35); asthma, 1.29 (1.23-1.36); stroke, 1.89 (1.71-2.09); and kidney disease, 1.59 (1.44-1.77). Conclusion: Homeownership can be used to predict the prevalence of several chronic health conditions. Considering its significant influence, public health initiatives should focus on housing-related interventions to improve population health.


Assuntos
Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental , Propriedade , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Propriedade/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevalência , Idoso , Adulto , Habitação , Adolescente , Adulto Jovem
9.
Malar J ; 23(1): 148, 2024 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38750468

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Vector control using insecticides is a key prevention strategy against malaria. Unfortunately, insecticide resistance in mosquitoes threatens all progress in malaria control. In the perspective of managing this resistance, new insecticide formulations are being tested to improve the effectiveness of vector control tools. METHODS: The efficacy and residual activity of Pirikool® 300 CS was evaluated in comparison with Actellic® 300 CS in experimental huts at the Tiassalé experimental station on three substrates including cement, wood and mud. The mortality, blood-feeding inhibition, exiting behaviour and deterrency of free-flying wild mosquitoes was evaluated. Cone bioassay tests with susceptible and resistant mosquito strains were conducted in the huts to determine residual efficacy. RESULTS: A total of 20,505 mosquitoes of which 10,979 (53%) wild female Anopheles gambiae were collected for 112 nights. Residual efficacy obtained from monthly cone bioassay was higher than 80% with the susceptible, laboratory-maintained An. gambiae Kisumu strain, from the first to the tenth study period on all three types of treated substrate for both Actellic® 300CS and Pirikool® 300CS. This residual efficacy on the wild Tiassalé strain was over 80% until the 4th month of study on Pirikool® 300CS S treated substrates. Overall 24-h mortalities of wild free-flying An. gambiae sensu lato which entered in the experimental huts over the 8-months trial on Pirikool® 300CS treatment was 50.5%, 75.9% and 52.7%, respectively, on cement wall, wood wall and mud wall. The positive reference product Actellic® 300CS treatment induced mortalities of 42.0%, 51.8% and 41.8% on cement wall, wood wall and mud wall. CONCLUSION: Pirikool® 300CS has performed really well against resistant strains of An. gambiae using indoor residual spraying method in experimental huts. It could be an alternative product for indoor residual spraying in response to the vectors' resistance to insecticides.


Assuntos
Anopheles , Inseticidas , Controle de Mosquitos , Anopheles/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Controle de Mosquitos/métodos , Inseticidas/farmacologia , Feminino , Mosquitos Vetores/efeitos dos fármacos , Habitação , Resistência a Inseticidas , Malária/prevenção & controle
10.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1313, 2024 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38750473

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The current study is a case study of a Maori (Indigenous people of New Zealand) organisation and their developmental processes in creating a kaumatua (older people) housing village for health and social wellbeing. This study identifies how a set of established co-design and culturally-centred principles were enacted when creating and developing the village. METHOD: A mixed-method concurrent design was used in creating the case with interviews (n = 4), focus groups (N = 4 with 16 total participants) and survey questionnaires (n = 56) involving kaumatua and organisation members. RESULTS: Survey results illustrate that suitable and affordable housing are associated with self-rated health, loneliness, and life satisfaction. The primary purpose of the housing village was to enable kaumatua to be connected to the marae (community meeting house) as part of a larger vision of developing intergenerational housing around the marae to enhance wellbeing. Further, key themes around visioning, collaborative team and funding, leadership, fit-for-purpose design, and tenancy management were grounded in cultural elements using te ao Maori (Maori worldview). CONCLUSION: This case study illustrates several co-design and culturally-centred principles from a previously developed toolkit that supported the project. This case study demonstrates how one community enacted these principles to provide the ground for developing a housing project that meets the health and social wellbeing of kaumatua.


Assuntos
Nível de Saúde , Habitação , Bem-Estar Psicológico , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Focais , Entrevistas como Assunto , Povo Maori , Nova Zelândia , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 121(20): e2306287121, 2024 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709927

RESUMO

This study examines the impact of residential mobility on electoral participation among the poor by matching data from Moving to Opportunity, a US-based multicity housing-mobility experiment, with nationwide individual voter data. Nearly all participants in the experiment were Black and Hispanic families who originally lived in high-poverty public housing developments. Notably, the study finds that receiving a housing voucher to move to a low-poverty neighborhood decreased adult participants' voter participation for nearly two decades-a negative impact equal to or outpacing that of the most effective get-out-the-vote campaigns in absolute magnitude. This finding has important implications for understanding residential mobility as a long-run depressant of voter turnout among extremely low-income adults.


Assuntos
Pobreza , Humanos , Adulto , Masculino , Feminino , Dinâmica Populacional , Populações Vulneráveis/estatística & dados numéricos , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Depressão/epidemiologia , Hispânico ou Latino/estatística & dados numéricos , Habitação Popular/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos , Negro ou Afro-Americano , Votação
12.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e075194, 2024 May 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38740498

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Canada, the Public Health Agency surveillance of new HIV cases has demonstrated annual increasing rates since 2020. The rates of new HIV cases are highest in the province of Saskatchewan. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the project was to conduct a resident-oriented realist evaluation of an innovative supportive housing programme, Sanctum, for people living with HIV/AIDS who also face social care issues, such as homelessness. This project took place in Saskatchewan, a province that is seeking innovative approaches to improve quality of life and HIV/AIDS management for its citizens. Our evaluation addressed how and why participants were successful (or not) within the Sanctum programme. DESIGN AND SETTING: Sanctum is a housing programme located in an inner-city location within the province of Saskatchewan. A unique component of this evaluation was the inclusion of an individual with lived experience, a resident partner, as a member of the research team. PARTICIPANTS: 11 recent Sanctum graduates, seven men and four women, were recruited for client partner-led in-depth, semistructured interviews. INTERVENTIONS: Prior to the evaluation, we developed a realist programme theory with potential causal explanations, known as context-mechanism-outcomes (CMO) configurations. Interview data from the evaluation and ongoing discussions with Sanctum board members and our resident partner were used to test, refine and validate the final programme theory and CMO configurations. RESULTS: CMO configurations at the micro (individual), meso (interpersonal) and macro (community) levels complement the over-arching programme theory. Key findings were the importance of Sanctum's harm reduction philosophy, accompanied by a non-judgmental and patient-oriented approach. Participants were supported to reduce risky behaviour, improve self-care management and develop healthier relationships within a 'safe' home-like setting. Underlying mechanisms that contributed to participants' success in the programme included: intrinsic motivation, self-worth, belongingness, empowerment and self-efficacy. Evidence-informed recommendations are offered to support Sanctum-like programme development for individuals with holistic health needs related to HIV/AIDS diagnoses and lack of access to necessary social determinants of health. CONCLUSIONS: Stigma associated with HIV/AIDS and living circumstances, such as homelessness, were successfully addressed using harm reduction principles and judgement-free approaches within a family-like environment.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Pessoas Mal Alojadas , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Qualidade de Vida , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Saskatchewan , Adulto , Pessoas Mal Alojadas/psicologia , Habitação , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
13.
Med Care ; 62(6): 359-366, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728676

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Housing is a critical social determinant of health that can be addressed through hospital-supported community benefit programming. OBJECTIVES: To explore the prevalence of hospital-based programs that address housing-related needs, categorize the specific actions taken to address housing, and determine organizational and community-level factors associated with investing in housing. RESEARCH DESIGN: This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined a nationally representative dataset of administrative documents from nonprofit hospitals that addressed social determinants of health in their federally mandated community benefit implementation plans. We conducted descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses to examine hospital and community characteristics associated with whether a hospital invested in housing programs. Using an inductive approach, we categorized housing investments into distinct categories. MEASURES: The main outcome measure was a dichotomous variable representing whether a hospital invested in one or more housing programs in their community. RESULTS: Twenty percent of hospitals invested in one or more housing programs. Hospitals that addressed housing in their implementation strategies were larger on average, less likely to be in rural communities, and more likely to be serving populations with greater housing needs. Housing programs fell into 1 of 7 categories: community partner collaboration (34%), social determinants of health screening (9%), medical respite centers (4%), community social determinants of health liaison (11%), addressing specific needs of homeless populations (16%), financial assistance (21%), and targeting high-risk populations (5%). CONCLUSIONS: Currently, a small subset of hospitals nationally are addressing housing. Hospitals may need additional policy support, external partnerships, and technical assistance to address housing in their communities.


Assuntos
Habitação , Organizações sem Fins Lucrativos , Determinantes Sociais da Saúde , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos , Organizações sem Fins Lucrativos/estatística & dados numéricos , Organizações sem Fins Lucrativos/organização & administração
15.
Chemosphere ; 358: 142095, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38663681

RESUMO

Exposure to indoor dust is of concern since dust may be contaminated by various toxic chemicals and people spend considerable time indoors. Factors impacting human exposure risks to contaminants in indoor dust may differ from those affecting the loadings of contaminants, but the dominant factors have not yet been well clarified. In this study, the occurrence, human exposure, and related influencing factors of several classes of legacy and emerging contaminants in residential dust across Beijing were investigated, including per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and three types of flame retardants (FRs), i.e., organophosphate esters (OPEs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and novel halogenated FRs (NHFRs). OPEs (median: 3847 ng/g) were the most abundant group, followed by PBDEs (1046 ng/g) and NHFRs (520 ng/g). PFASs (14.3 ng/g) were one to two orders of magnitude lower than FRs. The estimated daily intakes of these contaminants were relatively higher for toddlers than other age groups, with oral ingestion being the main exposure pathway compared with dermal contact. Higher human exposure risks were found in new buildings or newly finished homes due to the elevated intake of emerging contaminants (such as OPEs). Furthermore, higher risks were also found in homes with wooden floors, which were mainly associated with higher levels of PFASs, chloroalkyl and alkyl OPEs, compared with tile floors. Citizens in the urban area also showed higher exposure risks than those in the suburban area. The quantity of household appliances and finishing styles (simple or luxurious) showed an insignificant impact on overall human exposure risks despite their significant effect on the levels of some of the dust contaminants. Results in this study are of importance in understanding human exposure to the co-existence of multiple contaminants in indoor dust.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados , Poeira , Exposição Ambiental , Monitoramento Ambiental , Retardadores de Chama , Éteres Difenil Halogenados , Habitação , Poeira/análise , Humanos , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/análise , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/estatística & dados numéricos , Pequim , Retardadores de Chama/análise , Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Éteres Difenil Halogenados/análise , Criança , Adulto , Pré-Escolar , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise , Organofosfatos/análise , Lactente , China , Adolescente
16.
Environ Pollut ; 350: 124010, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38648964

RESUMO

Microenvironments, such as student dormitories, differ from general residential environments. They are characterized by small spaces, poor air circulation, high personnel densities, and electronic products, such as computers that are turned on for extended periods, leading to increased pollution concentrations. The limited space and poor air circulation reduce migration of contaminants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), making it easier for PBDEs to accumulate. However, few studies have been conducted on small group dwellings, including student dormitory dwellings. We collected dust samples from student dormitories of a university to analyze the characteristics and traceability of PBDEs in dormitory microenvironments. The results showed that PBDE congeners were widely present in university dormitories and the order of median concentration of ∑10PBDEs was as follows: male old-fashioned dormitory (273 ng/g) > female four-person dormitory (132 ng/g) > female two-person dormitory (132 ng/g) > male two-person dormitory (96.2 ng/g) > female old-fashioned dormitory (91.6 ng/g) > male four-person apartment (51.8 ng/g). BDE-209 was the most abundant PBDE congener, followed by BDE-47, and BDE-28. PBDEs were also found in typical electrical appliances, with higher concentrations in laptops than in desktops, and higher concentrations in desktops than in idle ones. According to Spearman correlation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we also found that boards and wallpaper materials were common sources of contamination in the microenvironment of student dormitories, and that female dormitories had more sources of PBDE emissions. Human exposure to PBDEs in students is below the US Environmental Protection Agency reference dose. Although exposure to PBDEs generated in dormitories does not pose a significant health risk, the potential hazards of PBDEs to the reagent environment remain to be investigated.


Assuntos
Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados , Exposição Ambiental , Monitoramento Ambiental , Éteres Difenil Halogenados , Habitação , Estudantes , Éteres Difenil Halogenados/análise , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/análise , Poluição do Ar em Ambientes Fechados/estatística & dados numéricos , Poeira/análise , Universidades , Poluentes Atmosféricos/análise
17.
Perspect Public Health ; 144(3): 187-198, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38616280

RESUMO

AIMS: Addressing fuel poverty is a critical public health issue given its recent rise in prevalence across Europe. Although previous research identifies national risk markers of fuel poverty, evidence is lacking on whether these are consistent across local geographies, and the equity of local interventions. In the UK's current economic climate, it is more crucial than ever that services benefit households in greatest need. This study aimed to determine significant predictors of fuel poverty among households in Bradford, England, comparing them to national-level predictors, and evaluate if households possessing significant fuel poverty predictors were equitably referred to a local fuel poverty service (Warm Homes Healthy People, WHHP). METHODS: A multivariate logistic regression model determined significant fuel poverty predictors in Bradford using household-level data from the Energy Saving Trust and the Low Income High Costs fuel poverty definition. Statistical testing highlighted significant differences in predictors of fuel poverty between households referred to WHHP and all Bradford households. RESULTS: Significant (p < .05) predictors of fuel poverty included: living in an area with lower average household incomes and higher proportion of ethnic minority individuals, and living in a property with a lower energy efficiency rating. Households living in a detached or older property, and homeowners were more likely to be fuel poor. Differences in the direction of the relationship with fuel poverty were identified between some national and local predictors. Most predictors were significantly (p < .05) overrepresented among WHHP households, suggesting equitable service reach. Ethnic minorities, younger people, and multiperson households were underrepresented. CONCLUSIONS: Local fuel poverty predictors were similar to many national-level predictors, but identified differences in the direction of the relationship between some national and local predictors reaffirm the value of locally focused research. WHHP successfully targeted households possessing key predictors, but should ensure that ethnic minorities, younger people, and multiperson households are equitably referred.


Assuntos
Pobreza , Inglaterra , Humanos , Características da Família , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
18.
Public Health Res Pract ; 34(1)2024 Apr 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38569574

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: People living in subsidised low-income housing are more likely to smoke and experience secondhand smoke exposure compared to the general population. While tobacco control interventions have yielded substantial population health benefits, people living in subsidised housing experience a greater burden of tobacco-related harms. We synthesised existing peer-reviewed and grey literature to determine tobacco control interventions that have been implemented in subsidised housing globally, and to understand their impact on smoking and secondhand smoke exposure. METHODS: We searched five databases for peer-reviewed research, and Google Advanced for grey literature. We adhered to the JBI Scoping Review Methodology and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) checklist. RESULTS: Fifty-seven sources met the eligibility criteria. The most common type of intervention was mandatory smoking bans covering all indoor spaces (n = 32), followed by cessation-focused interventions (n = 19). Interventions that indirectly addressed smoking were the least common (n = 6). Our findings suggest smoking bans can increase smoking cessation and reduce secondhand smoke exposure, especially if implemented alongside cessation support strategies. CONCLUSION: Tobacco control interventions targeting subsidised housing demonstrate positive effects on tobacco-related outcomes for residents and provide an important opportunity to address health disparities. Future research should examine the long-term impacts of the interventions, including potential unintended consequences, in varied subsidised housing contexts.


Assuntos
Política Antifumo , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco , Humanos , Habitação , Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco/prevenção & controle , Pobreza
19.
J Emerg Manag ; 22(7): 87-99, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38573732

RESUMO

Manufactured housing communities (MHCs), commonly referred to as mobile home parks, provide an estimated 2.7 million American households with largely unsubsidized, affordable housing. Climate change threatens those who call these communities home by exacerbating known structural and social vulnerabilities associated with this housing type-including but not limited to increased risks to flooding, extreme temperatures, high winds, and wildfires. Climate change requires emergency managers to understand the diverse, integrated, and complex vulnerabilities of MHCs that affect their exposure to climate change risk. This article presents findings from an integrative literature review focused on the climate-related vulnerabilities of these communities described at three levels of scale: household, housing structure, and park community. It then draws on 15 years of engagement and action research with MHC residents and stakeholders in Vermont, including several federally declared flooding disasters, to distill key recommendations for emergency managers for assisting MHCs to prepare for and respond to emergencies. As climate change accelerates, emergency managers can increase efficacy by learning about the MHCs in their jurisdictions by leveraging the best available data to characterize risks, integrating MHCs into planning and mitigation activities, and engaging in conversations with stakeholders, including MHC residents and their trusted partners.


Assuntos
Mudança Climática , Desastres , Humanos , Habitação , Comunicação , Inundações
20.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 931, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38561729

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rising housing prices are becoming a top public health priority and are an emerging concern for policy makers and community leaders. This report reviews and synthesizes evidence examining the association between changes in housing price and health outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature review by searching the SCOPUS and PubMed databases for keywords related to housing price and health. Articles were screened by two reviewers for eligibility, which restricted inclusion to original research articles measuring changes in housing prices and health outcomes, published prior to June 31st, 2022. RESULTS: Among 23 eligible studies, we found that changes in housing prices were heterogeneously associated with physical and mental health outcomes, with multiple mechanisms contributing to both positive and negative health outcomes. Income-level and home-ownership status were identified as key moderators, with lower-income individuals and renters experience negative health consequences from rising housing prices. This may have resulted from increased stress and financial strain among these groups. Meanwhile, the economic benefits of rising housing prices were seen to support health for higher-income individuals and homeowners - potentially due to increased wealth or perception of wealth. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the associations identified in this review, it appears that potential gains to health associated with rising housing prices are inequitably distributed. Housing policies should consider the health inequities born by renters and low-income individuals. Further research should explore mechanisms and interventions to reduce uneven economic impacts on health.


Assuntos
Habitação , Humanos , Habitação/economia
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