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1.
s.l; s.n; 2021. 106 p.
Não convencional em Português | HomeoIndex - Homeopatia | ID: biblio-1380660

RESUMO

Os Organoterápicos são matrizes de órgãos sadios retirados de animais sadios, especialmente o porco e o carneiro. Este livro resume, em um protocolo de prescrição de Organoterápicos, sempre associados ao Medicamento Constitucional, a experiência bem sucedida de 9 anos de controle de doenças degenerativas graves. Este protocolo já representa assim, um modo de prescrever Organoterápicos, livre dos erros cometidos nestes anos.


Assuntos
Organoterapia/normas , Terapêutica Homeopática
2.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 249: 112386, 2020 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31730891

RESUMO

AIM OF THE STUDY: The indigenous people of Sikkim Himalaya possess indispensable traditional knowledge including the use of flora and fauna due to their close association with nature. The present study aims to explore the rich and undocumented ethnozoological practices of different indigenous communities of the Sikkim Himalaya. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaire interviews among the traditional healers and indigenous communities of Sikkim. A total of 91 respondents covering all four districts of Sikkim were interviewed from September 2017-April 2018. RESULTS: This study recorded a total of 59 species belonging to nine taxonomic groups used for traditional ethnozoological practices by the indigenous communities of Sikkim. Mammals represented 58% of the total animals followed by birds (22%). Among the total, 71% of animal species were used for zootherapy whereas 29% were used for religious customs or shamanistic practices. Almost 64% species were used for treatment of more than one disease and the chief mode of preparation was by boiling the body parts. Among different parts used in traditional medicine, meat was most preferred while horns and hairs were mostly used for religious purposes. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that traditional medicine including zootherapy still serves as a source of primary healthcare in rural areas of Sikkim and provides an identity to the culture of a region. We recommend documentation of more such traditional medicinal systems along with scientific validation of traditional practices with modern tools. Biodiversity Management Committees (BMCs), the legally formed bodies at local level, may be entrusted in documentation of such practices which might contribute significantly in the conservation of traditional practices and also preserves the associated traditional knowledge as per the provision of Biological Diversity Act of India.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Organoterapia/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Animais , Etnofarmacologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Populacionais , Siquim , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
3.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 14(1): 60, 2018 Sep 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30223856

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hunting wildlife for medicinal purposes is a widespread practice throughout Brazil; however, studies about the animals used for zootherapeutic practices have been performed almost exclusively with traders (herbalists) and end consumers, and not hunters. This makes it difficult to completely understand the market chain, trade strategies, and drivers of this practice. The present study investigated the species hunted or trapped for traditional medicinal uses by collecting data about the use and trade of the zootheurapeutic species. METHODS: We collected data through semi-structured questionnaires complemented by free interviews and informal conversations with hunters in five municipalities of semiarid region of the NE Brazil. We calculated the Use-Value (UV) index to determine the relative importance of each species reported by interviewees. The Multiple Linear Regression model was used to assess the influence of socioeconomic factors (age, schooling, residence zone, trade of zootherapeutic species) on species richness exploited by hunters. RESULTS: Hunters reported a significant richness of species (n = 39) intentionally or opportunistically captured for use as remedies for treatment of 92 diseases or conditions in humans or livestock. Respondents also reported trade strategies that were well-organized and quickly directed the selling of wild animals or byproducts via modern technology. We found a weak positive relationship only between species richness and hunters' age via MLR model. CONCLUSIONS: The hunting and use of wild species for medicinal purposes are culturally disseminated activities among hunters. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying hunters in order to understanding the dynamics of bushmeat exploitation and to develop more efficient strategies for wildlife use and conservation.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Carne , Medicina Tradicional , Organoterapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Animais , Brasil , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
4.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 14(1): 37, 2018 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29792196

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Using animals for different purposes goes back to the dawn of mankind. Animals served as a source of food, medicine, and clothing for humans and provided other services. This study was designed to undertake a cross-sectional ethnozoological field survey among the residents of Metema Woreda from November 2015 to May 2016. METHODS: Data were collected through studied questionnaires, interviews, and focus group discussions with 36 purposively selected respondents. RESULTS: Ethnozoological data were collected of the local name of the animals, part of the animal used, mode of preparation and administration, and of additional information deemed useful. A total of 51 animal species were identified to treat around 36 different ailments. Of the animals used therapeutically, 27 species were mammals, 9 were birds, 7 arthropods, 6 reptiles, and 1 species each represented fish and annelids. Furthermore, the honey of the bee Apis mellifera was used to relieve many ailments and scored the highest fidelity value (n = 35.97%). The snake (Naja naja) and the teeth of crocodiles (Crocodylus spp.) had the lowest fidelity value (n = 2.56%). CONCLUSION: The results show that there is a wealth of ethnozoological knowledge to be documented which could be of use in developing new drugs. Hence, it is hoped that the information contained in this paper will be useful in future ethnozoological, ethnopharmacological, and conservation-related research of the region.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional Africana , Organoterapia , Zoologia , Adulto , Idoso , Animais , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Estudos Transversais , Etiópia , Feminino , Humanos , Conhecimento , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
5.
Women Birth ; 31(4): e245-e257, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29174274

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent studies show that human placenta, processed and encapsulated for postpartum consumption, contains a host of trace minerals and hormones that could conceivably affect maternal physiology. Our objective was to investigate whether salivary hormone concentrations of women ingesting their own encapsulated placenta during the early postpartum differed from those of women consuming a placebo. METHODS: Randomly assigned participants (N=27) were given a supplement containing either their dehydrated and homogenized placenta (n=12), or placebo (n=15). Saliva samples were collected during late pregnancy and early postpartum. Samples of participants' processed placenta, and the encapsulated placebo, were also collected. Hormone analyses were conducted on all samples utilizing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in salivary hormone concentrations between the placenta and placebo groups post-supplementation that did not exist pre-supplementation. There were, however, significant dose-response relationships between the concentration of all 15 detected hormones in the placenta capsules and corresponding salivary hormone measures in placenta group participants not seen in the placebo group. The higher salivary concentrations of these hormones in the placenta group reflects the higher concentrations of these hormones in the placenta supplements, compared to the placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Some hormones in encapsulated placenta lead to small but significant differences in hormonal profiles of women taking placenta capsules compared to those taking a placebo, although these dose-response changes were not sufficient to result in significant hormonal differences between groups. Whether modest hormonal changes due to placenta supplementation are associated with therapeutic postpartum effects, however, awaits further investigation.


Assuntos
Ingestão de Alimentos , Hormônios/análise , Organoterapia , Placenta , Período Pós-Parto , Saliva/química , Adulto , Terapias Complementares , Feminino , Humanos , Organoterapia/efeitos adversos , Organoterapia/métodos , Organoterapia/psicologia , Projetos Piloto , Cuidado Pós-Natal , Gravidez , Adulto Jovem
6.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 218(4): 401.e1-401.e11, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28859955

RESUMO

Placentophagy or placentophagia, the postpartum ingestion of the placenta, is widespread among mammals; however, no contemporary human culture incorporates eating placenta postpartum as part of its traditions. At present, there is an increasing interest in placentophagy among postpartum women, especially in the United States. The placenta can be eaten raw, cooked, roasted, dehydrated, or encapsulated or through smoothies and tinctures. The most frequently used preparation appears to be placenta encapsulation after steaming and dehydration. Numerous companies offer to prepare the placenta for consumption, although the evidence for positive effects of human placentophagy is anecdotal and limited to self-reported surveys. Without any scientific evidence, individuals promoting placentophagy, especially in the form of placenta encapsulation, claim that it is associated with certain physical and psychosocial benefits. We found that there is no scientific evidence of any clinical benefit of placentophagy among humans, and no placental nutrients and hormones are retained in sufficient amounts after placenta encapsulation to be potentially helpful to the mother postpartum. In contrast to the belief of clinical benefits associated with human placentophagy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued a warning due to a case in which a newborn infant developed recurrent neonatal group B Streptococcus sepsis after the mother ingested contaminated placenta capsules containing Streptococcus agalactiae. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that the intake of placenta capsules should be avoided owing to inadequate eradication of infectious pathogens during the encapsulation process. Therefore, in response to a woman who expresses an interest in placentophagy, physicians should inform her about the reported risks and the absence of clinical benefits associated with the ingestion. In addition, clinicians should inquire regarding a history of placenta ingestion in cases of postpartum maternal or neonatal infections such as group B Streptococcus sepsis. In conclusion, there is no professional responsibility on clinicians to offer placentophagy to pregnant women. Moreover, because placentophagy is potentially harmful with no documented benefit, counseling women should be directive: physicians should discourage this practice. Health care organizations should develop clear clinical guidelines to implement a scientific and professional approach to human placentophagy.


Assuntos
Ingestão de Alimentos , Organoterapia , Placenta , Período Pós-Parto , Feminino , Humanos , Resíduos de Serviços de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Organoterapia/efeitos adversos , Gravidez
7.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 191: 135-151, 2016 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27288756

RESUMO

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: This review documents the wide and varied repertoire of traditional practices based on the use of wild vertebrates in Spanish ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) from the early 20th century to the present. Empirical practices, both ritual and magical, are recorded, and these EVM data are compared with those of other countries in the Mediterranean Region and Latin America. The data collected here could form a scientific foundation for future inventories of traditional knowledge and help in the discovery of new drugs for livestock. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative systematic review of international and national databases in the fields of ethnobiology, ethnoveterinary medicine, folklore and ethnography was made. Information was obtained from more than 60 documentary sources. RESULTS: We recorded the use of 30 wild vertebrates and a total of 84 empirical remedies based on the use of a single species. The two most relevant zoological groups are reptiles and mammals. A wide diversity of body parts or products have been and are used. The meat and skin of snakes are the animal products most commonly used. These zootherapeutic resources have been and are used to treat or prevent ca. 50 animal diseases or conditions, in particular digestive and reproductive ailments, together with some infectious diseases. Sheep, cattle and equines form the group of domestic animals in which the greatest number of useful species are employed. In addition, many remedies and practices of the magical type are documented. In comparison with other culturally related areas, this is a rich heritage. CONCLUSIONS: Contemporary Spanish EVM practices amass a great richness of wild animal-based remedies. A diversity of animal parts or products have been used, offering a cultural heritage that could be a fundamental step in the discovery of new and low-cost drugs for treating livestock and alternative materials for pharmaceutical purposes. This overview contributes to the inventory of some uses and rituals seriously threatened by the progressive loss of local veterinary knowledge.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens/classificação , Etnofarmacologia , Gado , Medicina Tradicional , Organoterapia , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Comportamento Ritualístico , Comparação Transcultural , Características Culturais , Espécies em Perigo de Extinção , Humanos , Organoterapia/efeitos adversos , Espanha
8.
Rev. clín. esp. (Ed. impr.) ; 216(3): 157-164, abr. 2016. tab, ilus
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-150043

RESUMO

A diferencia de la insuficiencia cardiaca (IC) crónica, el tratamiento de la IC aguda no ha cambiado en la última década. Los fármacos empleados han demostrado controlar los síntomas, pero no han conseguido una protección orgánica ni una reducción de la morbimortalidad a medio y largo plazo. Los avances en el conocimiento de la fisiopatología de la IC aguda sugieren que el tratamiento debe dirigirse no solo a corregir las alteraciones hemodinámicas y a conseguir un alivio sintomático, sino sobre todo a prevenir el daño orgánico, contrarrestando el remodelado miocárdico y las alteraciones cardiacas y extracardiacas. Las moléculas que en la fase aguda de la IC puedan ejercer acciones vasodilatadoras y antiinflamatorias —y que sean capaces de detener la muerte celular, favoreciendo los mecanismos de reparación— podrían tener un papel esencial en la protección orgánica (AU)


Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Insuficiência Cardíaca/prevenção & controle , Insuficiência Cardíaca/terapia , Organoterapia/métodos , Organoterapia , Cardiotônicos/uso terapêutico , Insuficiência Cardíaca/fisiopatologia , Hemodinâmica/fisiologia , Morte Celular , Morte Celular/fisiologia , Miocárdio/patologia , Natriuréticos/uso terapêutico
9.
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs ; 45(1): 78-89, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26815801

RESUMO

Postpartum women are consuming their placentas to achieve claimed health benefits, including improved mood, energy, and lactation. Strong scientific evidence to substantiate these claims is lacking. Self-reported benefits from some women include improved mood and lactation; animal models suggest there may be an analgesic effect. Possible risks include infection, thromboembolism from estrogens in placental tissue, and accumulation of environmental toxins. Women's health care providers should be aware of this practice to help women make informed decisions.


Assuntos
Ingestão de Alimentos , Organoterapia , Placenta/fisiologia , Animais , Suplementos Nutricionais/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Comportamento Materno , Organoterapia/efeitos adversos , Organoterapia/métodos , Organoterapia/psicologia , Período Pós-Parto/psicologia , Gravidez , Medição de Risco
10.
Rev. homeopatia (Säo Paulo) ; 79(1/2): 49-58, 2016.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: lil-788868

RESUMO

Organoterápicos (OT) são medicamentos diluídos e agitados, produzidos a partir de órgãos de animais saudáveis e utilizados como complemento ao tratamento homeopático ou convencional. As matérias-primas (matrizes) disponíveis no país não ofereciam rastreabilidade ou informações como a origem do material preparado. Este artigo apresenta um relato etnográfico e descreve a produção de matrizes de OTs a partir de tecidos de carneiro nas proporções (escalas) decimal, centesimal e cinquenta milesimal. Foram obtidos 70 diferentes órgãos, partes de órgãos e algumas composições, com informações completas sobre a origem e rastreabilidade...


Organotherapy (OT) employs serially diluted and agitated medicines prepared with organs of healthy animals as adjuvant to homeopathic or conventional treatment. The starting-substances for OT available in Brazil have no traceability and there is no information as to their origin. In the present article we present an ethnographic report of organ collection and preparation of 70 new OT medicines from sheep tissue in the decimal, centesimal and 50 milesimal scales which meet all traceability requirements...


Assuntos
Animais , Dinamização , Farmacotécnica Homeopática , Organoterapia/normas , Antropologia Cultural , Ovinos
11.
Rev. homeopatia (São Paulo) ; 79(1/2): 49-58, 2016.
Artigo em Português | HomeoIndex - Homeopatia | ID: hom-11261

RESUMO

Organoterápicos (OT) são medicamentos diluídos e agitados, produzidos a partir de órgãos de animais saudáveis e utilizados como complemento ao tratamento homeopático ou convencional. As matérias-primas (matrizes) disponíveis no país não ofereciam rastreabilidade ou informações como a origem do material preparado. Este artigo apresenta um relato etnográfico e descreve a produção de matrizes de OTs a partir de tecidos de carneiro nas proporções (escalas) decimal, centesimal e cinquenta milesimal. Foram obtidos 70 diferentes órgãos, partes de órgãos e algumas composições, com informações completas sobre a origem e rastreabilidade. (AU)


Organotherapy (OT) employs serially diluted and agitated medicines prepared with organs of healthy animals as adjuvant to homeopathic or conventional treatment. The starting-substances for OT available in Brazil have no traceability and there is no information as to their origin. In the present article we present an ethnographic report of organ collection and preparation of 70 new OT medicines from sheep tissue in the decimal, centesimal and 50 milesimal scales which meet all traceability requirements. (AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Organoterapia/normas , Dinamização , Farmacotécnica Homeopática , Antropologia Cultural , Ovinos
12.
Rio de Janeiro; s.n; 2016. 213 p. ilus.
Tese em Português | HISA - História da Saúde | ID: his-37214

RESUMO

A investigação tratou das controvérsias em torno da opoterapia, terapêutica recomendada ao tratamento endocrinológico de pessoas homossexuais. Neste trabalho analisamos as prisões de 195 homossexuais, detidos, por volta de 1930, nas dependências do Laboratório de Antropologia Criminal, anexo ao Instituto de Identificação da Policia Civil do Rio de Janeiro. Tais presos, identificados como “pederastas passivos” foram colocados à disposição do médico legista Dr. Leonídio Ribeiro (1893-1976), então Diretor do Instituto, entre 1931 e 1946. Para a exploração do tema, abordamos as técnicas de identificação disponíveis, entre fins do século XIX e primeiras décadas do século XX, bem como procuramos entender a utilização de saberes biomédicos que subsidiaram diferentes mutações do olhar médico em relação aos corpos, conformando-os sob a perspectiva de teses biodeterministas, como a biotipologia, então em voga. Além destes, a obra de Leonídio – Homossexualismo e Endocrinologia (1938) – foi analisada numa perspectiva crítica, mormente quando colocada em contato com as querelas endereçadas à prática da opoterapia e da eugenia, companhando as principais diretrizes teóricas que alimentaram o debate em torno dos usos da endocrinologia para fins criminológicos. Através da busca de embates teóricos, nessas condições históricas, acompanhamos o fluxo das idéias do professor Thales Martins (1876 - 1979), no rol das discussões dos usos da opoterapia, por meio de seu tratado Glândulas Sexuais e Hipófise Anterior (1936) e artigos publicados nos Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia (1951), com fins de expor argumentos em conflito com os simpatizantes da endocriminologia. (AU)


Assuntos
Identidade de Gênero , Homossexualidade , Hormônios , Eugenia , Organoterapia
13.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 11: 38, 2015 May 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25947365

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Faunal resources have played an extensive range of roles in human life from the initial days of recorded history. In addition to their importance, animals have been acknowledged in religion, art, music and literature and several other different cultural manifestations of mankind. Human beings are acquainted with use of animals for foodstuff, cloth, medicine, etc. since ancient times. Huge work has been carried out on ethnobotany and traditional medicine. Animal and their products are also holding medicinal properties that can be exploited for the benefit of human beings like plants. In Tanzania, many tribal communities are spread all over the country and these people are still totally depended on local customary medicinal system for their health care. In the world Tanzania is gifted with wide range of floral and faunal biodiversity. The use of traditional medicine from animals by Sukuma ethnic group of Busega district is the aim of the present study. METHOD: In order to collect the information on ethnozoological use about animal and their products predominant among this tribe in Busega district, a study was carried out from August 2012, to July 2013. Data were collected through semi-structured questionnaire and open interview with 180 (118 male and 62 females) selected people. The people from whom the data were collected comprise old age community members, traditional health practicener, fishermen and cultural officers. The name of animal and other ethnozoological information were documented. Pictures and discussion were also recorded with the help of camera and voice recorder. RESULT: A total of 42 various animal species were used in nearly 30 different medicinal purposes including STD, stoppage of bleeding, reproductive disorders, asthma, weakness, tuberculosis, cough, paralysis and wound and for other religious beliefs. It has been noticed that animal used by Sukuma tribe, comprise of seventeen mammals, seven birds, four reptiles, eight arthropods and two mollusks. Some of the protected species were also used as important medicinal resources. We also found that cough, tuberculosis, asthma and other respiratory diseases are the utmost cited disease, as such, a number of traditional medicines are available for the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The present work indicates that 42 animal species were being used to treat nearly 30 different ailments and results show that ethnozoological practices are an important alternative medicinal practice by the Sukuma tribe living in Bungesa district. The present study also indicates the very rich ethnozoological knowledge of these people in relation to traditional medicine. So there is a critical need to properly document to keep a record of the ethnozoological information. We hope that the information generated in this study will be useful for further research in the field of ethnozoology, ethnopharmacology and conservation approach.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Organoterapia/métodos , Grupos Populacionais , Adulto , Animais , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Tanzânia
14.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 11: 15, 2015 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25608977

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Wild and domestic animals and their by-products are important ingredients in the preparation of curative, protective and preventive medicines. Despite the medicinal use of animals worldwide, this topic has received less attention than the use of medicinal plants. This study assessed the medicinal use of animals by mestizo communities living near San Guillermo MaB Reserve by addressing the following questions: What animal species and body parts are used? What ailments or diseases are treated with remedies from these species? To what extent do mestizo people use animals as a source of medicine? Is the use related to people's age? METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 171 inhabitants (15-93 years old) of four villages close to the Reserve: Tudcúm, Angualasto, Malimán and Colangüil. We calculated the informant consensus factor and fidelity level to test homogeneity of knowledge and to know the importance of different medicinal uses for a given species. RESULTS: The medicinal use of animals was reported by 57% of the surveyed people. Seven species were mentioned: Rhea pennata, Lama guanicoe, Puma concolor, Pseudalopex sp., Lama vicugna, Lepus europaeus and Conepatus chinga. Several body parts were used: fat, leg, bezoar-stone, stomach, feather, meat, blood, feces, wool, and liver. The fat of R. pennata was the most frequently used animal part, followed by the bezoar stone and the leg of L. guanicoe. Animals were used to treat 22 ailments, with respiratory and nervous system disorders being the most frequently treated diseases with a high degree of consensus. Old people used animals as remedies more frequently than young residents, showing some differences among villages. CONCLUSIONS: A low number of animal species was mentioned as used for medicinal purposes, which could be explained by the perception of strong control related the legislation that bans hunting and the erosion of traditional knowledge produced by mestizaje. However, the presence of a traditional medicine is deeply rooted in the community culture. Management strategy for protected areas should focus not only on the conservation and sustainability of biological resources, but also on the ancestral knowledge of local communities, such as the medicinal use of animals.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Organoterapia/métodos , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Argentina , Características Culturais , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Bases de Conhecimento , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , População Rural , Adulto Jovem
16.
Rev. homeopatia (Säo Paulo) ; 78(1/2): 1-7, 2015.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: lil-767349

RESUMO

O presente artigo descreve uma série de 9 casos de pacientes, de sexo feminino, idade de 31 a 56 anos, com diagnóstico de tireoidite autoimune, cujos títulos de anticorpos antitireoidianos diminuíram ou negativaram depois de ratamento homeopático. Além disso, em alguns casos foi possível recuperar o equilíbrio funcional da glândula. O acompanhamento foi variável, de 30 dias até 18 anos.


The present article describes a series of 9 cases corresponding to female patients, age 31 to 56 old, diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis, who exhibited reduced or negative anti-thyroid antibodies after homeopathic treatment. In some cases, normal function of thyroid was additionally achieved. Follow-up was variable, from 30 days to 18 years.


Assuntos
Humanos , Feminino , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Antitireóideos/uso terapêutico , Terapêutica Homeopática , Hipotireoidismo/terapia , Tireoidite Autoimune/terapia , Autoanticorpos/análise , Calcarea Carbonica , Lachesis muta/uso terapêutico , Lycopodium clavatum/uso terapêutico , Natrium Muriaticum/uso terapêutico , Organoterapia , Pulsatilla nigricans/uso terapêutico , Thyreoidinum/uso terapêutico
17.
Rev. homeopatia (São Paulo) ; 78(1/2): 1-7, 2015.
Artigo em Português | HomeoIndex - Homeopatia | ID: hom-11114

RESUMO

O presente artigo descreve uma série de 9 casos de pacientes, de sexo feminino, idade de 31 a 56 anos, com diagnóstico de tireoidite autoimune, cujos títulos de anticorpos antitireoidianos diminuíram ou negativaram depois de ratamento homeopático. Além disso, em alguns casos foi possível recuperar o equilíbrio funcional da glândula. O acompanhamento foi variável, de 30 dias até 18 anos. (AU)


The present article describes a series of 9 cases corresponding to female patients, age 31 to 56 old, diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis, who exhibited reduced or negative anti-thyroid antibodies after homeopathic treatment. In some cases, normal function of thyroid was additionally achieved. Follow-up was variable, from 30 days to 18 years. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Feminino , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Tireoidite Autoimune/terapia , Antitireóideos/uso terapêutico , Terapêutica Homeopática , Hipotireoidismo/terapia , Pulsatilla nigricans/uso terapêutico , Lycopodium clavatum/uso terapêutico , Calcarea Carbonica , Natrium Muriaticum/uso terapêutico , Lachesis muta/uso terapêutico , Autoanticorpos/análise , Organoterapia , Thyreoidinum/uso terapêutico
18.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 10: 76, 2014 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25412571

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pangolins (Manidae) have long been used for traditional medicinal purposes in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa. However, very little is known about the extent of this use, the body parts that are used and the ailments these practices are attempting to cure or alleviate. Pangolin body parts are used extensively and frequently by traditional medical practitioners in Sierra Leone. METHODS: A total of 63 traditional medical practitioners consented and were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires on the traditional medicinal use of pangolin body parts. The use value, informant agreement ratio and use agreement value for each pangolin part was calculated to ascertain the most sought after body part, the level of knowledge dissemination among traditional medical practitioners about body parts and the most culturally significant body part. RESULTS: It was found that 22 pangolin parts are used to treat various ailments and conditions under 17 international categories of diseases. The highest use value was recorded for scales while eyes had the highest level of consensus among the traditional medical practitioners. The highest use value and informant agreement ratio for scales were recorded for spiritual ailments. Scales were the most culturally significant body part according to the use agreement value. CONCLUSION: This study indicates a high importance value for pangolins as part of these communities' spiritual, cultural and medicinal beliefs. However, the numbers of individuals harvested from the wild remains unknown and unregulated even though pangolins have been listed under Schedule 2 of the Wildlife Conservation Act, 1972, of Sierra Leone, which prohibits any person from hunting or being in possession of pangolins. It is likely that this unregulated harvesting and poaching of this threatened species, for medicinal purposes, is unsustainable and there is an urgent need to determine pangolin population abundance within this region to ensure their sustainable harvesting for cultural use and conservation.


Assuntos
Mamíferos , Medicina Tradicional Africana , Organoterapia , Adulto , Animais , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Serra Leoa
19.
World J Gastroenterol ; 20(29): 9952-75, 2014 Aug 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25110425

RESUMO

Forty-four different animal biles obtained from both invertebrates and vertebrates (including human bile) have been used for centuries for a host of maladies in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) beginning with dog, ox and common carp biles approximately in the Zhou dynasty (c. 1046-256 BCE). Overall, different animal biles were prescribed principally for the treatment of liver, biliary, skin (including burns), gynecological and heart diseases, as well as diseases of the eyes, ears, nose, mouth and throat. We present an informed opinion of the clinical efficacy of the medicinal uses of the different animal biles based on their presently known principal chemical components which are mostly steroidal detergent-like molecules and the membrane lipids such as unesterified cholesterol and mixed phosphatidylcholines and sometimes sphingomyelin, as well as containing lipopigments derived from heme principally bilirubin glucuronides. All of the available information on the ethnopharmacological uses of biles in TCM were collated from the rich collection of ancient Chinese books on materia medica held in libraries in China and United States and the composition of various animal biles was based on rigorous separatory and advanced chemical identification techniques published since the mid-20(th) century collected via library (Harvard's Countway Library) and electronic searches (PubMed and Google Scholar). Our analysis of ethnomedical data and information on biliary chemistry shows that specific bile salts, as well as the common bile pigment bilirubin and its glucuronides plus the minor components of bile such as vitamins A, D, E, K, as well as melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) are salutary in improving liver function, dissolving gallstones, inhibiting bacterial and viral multiplication, promoting cardiac chronotropsim, as well as exhibiting anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, anti-oxidant, sedative, anti-convulsive, anti-allergic, anti-congestive, anti-diabetic and anti-spasmodic effects. Pig, wild boar and human biles diluted with alcohol were shown to form an artificial skin for burns and wounds one thousand years ago in the Tang dynasty (618-907 CE). Although various animal biles exhibit several generic effects in common, a number of biles appear to be advantageous for specific therapeutic indications. We attempt to understand these effects based on the pharmacology of individual components of bile as well as attempting to identify a variety of future research needs.


Assuntos
Bile , Etnofarmacologia , Materia Medica/uso terapêutico , Medicina Tradicional Chinesa/métodos , Organoterapia , Animais , Bile/química , China , Etnofarmacologia/história , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , História Antiga , Humanos , Materia Medica/história , Medicina Tradicional Chinesa/história , Organoterapia/história , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Med Food ; 17(6): 701-6, 2014 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24797662

RESUMO

We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 µm, HDB: 80.7 µm vs. NC: 48.0 µm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 µm, HDB: 81.2 µm vs. NC: 112.0 µm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model.


Assuntos
Artrite Experimental/tratamento farmacológico , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Osso e Ossos/efeitos dos fármacos , Cartilagem Articular/efeitos dos fármacos , Cervos , Organoterapia , Osteoartrite/tratamento farmacológico , Animais , Artrite Experimental/patologia , Produtos Biológicos/farmacologia , Doenças Ósseas/induzido quimicamente , Doenças Ósseas/prevenção & controle , Osso e Ossos/patologia , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Injeções , Iodoacetatos , Masculino , Osteoartrite/induzido quimicamente , Osteoartrite/patologia , Distribuição Aleatória , Ratos Wistar , Microtomografia por Raio-X/métodos
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