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1.
Commun Biol ; 7(1): 784, 2024 Jun 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38951577

RESUMO

Spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) are obligate intracellular bacteria that cause spotted fever. The limitations of gene manipulation pose great challenges to studying the infection mechanisms of Rickettsia. By combining bioorthogonal metabolism and click chemistry, we developed a method to label R. heilongjiangensis via azide moieties and achieved rapid pathogen localization without complex procedures. Moreover, we constructed a C57BL/6 mice infection model by simulating tick bites and discovered that the stomach is the target organ of R. heilongjiangensis infection through in vivo imaging systems, which explained the occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms following R. heilongjiangensis infection in some cases. This study offers a unique perspective for subsequent investigations into the pathogenic mechanisms of SFGR and identifies a potential target organ for R. heilongjiangensis.


Assuntos
Química Click , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Rickettsia , Animais , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/fisiologia , Camundongos , Química Click/métodos , Estômago/microbiologia , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Rickettsiose do Grupo da Febre Maculosa/microbiologia , Feminino , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Azidas/química
3.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 33(2): e005324, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958294

RESUMO

The Amblyomma genus (Arachnida: Ixodidae) is widely distributed in South America, with 34 species occurring in Brazil. Amblyomma nodosum Neumann 1889 is a species that predominantly feeds on Passeriformes during immature stages (larvae and nymphs) and anteaters (Myrmecophagidae) during adult stages. The aim of the present study is to report, for the first time, an unusual case of parasitism by adults of A. nodosum on a yellow cururu toad (Rhinella icterica) captured in the city of Nossa Senhora da Glória, Sergipe state (Northeastern Brazil) in the Caatinga biome, and also investigate the presence of DNA of Rickettsia in the collected material. DNA was extracted from all specimens collected (N=8) and subjected to PCR assays based on the tick 16S rRNA endogenous gene and gltA gene for Rickettsia sp. All samples (8/8; 100%) were positive for the 16S rRNA endogenous gene and two amplicons (obtained from one male and one female) were purified and sequenced. The BLASTn analysis of the sequences revealed a high degree of similarity (95-100%) with A. nodosum sequences previously deposited on GenBank, while the phylogenetic analysis clustered the sequences obtained in the same clade as A. nodosum sequences from Brazil.


Assuntos
Amblyomma , Animais , Brasil , Amblyomma/microbiologia , Amblyomma/parasitologia , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia , Infestações por Carrapato/diagnóstico , Masculino , Feminino , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , Bufonidae/parasitologia , Bufonidae/microbiologia
4.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 13(1): 54, 2024 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38982550

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rickettsia and related diseases have been identified as significant global public health threats. This study involved comprehensive field and systematic investigations of various rickettsial organisms in Yunnan Province. METHODS: Between May 18, 2011 and November 23, 2020, field investigations were conducted across 42 counties in Yunnan Province, China, encompassing small mammals, livestock, and ticks. Preliminary screenings for Rickettsiales involved amplifying the 16S rRNA genes, along with additional genus- or species-specific genes, which were subsequently confirmed through sequencing results. Sequence comparisons were carried out using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using the default parameters in the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) program. The chi-squared test was used to assess the diversities and component ratios of rickettsial agents across various parameters. RESULTS: A total of 7964 samples were collected from small mammals, livestock, and ticks through Yunnan Province and submitted for screening for rickettsial organisms. Sixteen rickettsial species from the genera Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Neoehrlichia, and Wolbachia were detected, with an overall prevalence of 14.72%. Among these, 11 species were identified as pathogens or potential pathogens to humans and livestock. Specifically, 10 rickettsial organisms were widely found in 42.11% (24 out of 57) of small mammal species. High prevalence was observed in Dremomys samples at 5.60%, in samples from regions with latitudes above 4000 m or alpine meadows, and in those obtained from Yuanmou County. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis were broadly infecting multiple genera of animal hosts. In contrast, the small mammal genera Neodon, Dremomys, Ochotona, Anourosorex, and Mus were carrying individually specific rickettsial agents, indicating host tropism. There were 13 rickettsial species detected in 57.14% (8 out of 14) of tick species, with the highest prevalence (37.07%) observed in the genus Rhipicephalus. Eight rickettsial species were identified in 2375 livestock samples. Notably, six new Rickettsiales variants/strains were discovered, and Candidatus Rickettsia longicornii was unambiguously identified. CONCLUSIONS: This large-scale survey provided further insight into the high genetic diversity and overall prevalence of emerging Rickettsiales within endemic hotspots in Yunnan Province. The potential threats posed by these emerging tick-borne Rickettsiales to public health warrant attention, underscoring the need for effective strategies to guide the prevention and control of emerging zoonotic diseases in China.


Assuntos
Variação Genética , Filogenia , Rickettsiales , Carrapatos , China/epidemiologia , Animais , Prevalência , Rickettsiales/genética , Rickettsiales/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsiales/classificação , Carrapatos/microbiologia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/análise , Gado/microbiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , Mamíferos/microbiologia , Humanos
5.
Parasitol Res ; 123(7): 261, 2024 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38967653

RESUMO

Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods that can transmit pathogens to their host. As insular ecosystems can enhance tick-host interactions, this study aimed to understand tick diversity, pathogen presence, and their respective associations in the Azores and Madeira archipelagos. Unfed or partially engorged ticks (n = 120) were collected from 58 cats and dogs in the Azores (n = 41 specimens) and Madeira (n = 79 specimens) from November 2018 to March 2019. Vector identification was based on morphology and molecular criteria. For pathogen sequencing, 18S gene fragment for Babesia/Hepatozoon and gltA for Rickettsia were performed. Sequence data was explored using BLAST and BLAST and phylogenetic inference tools. In the Azores, Ixodes hexagonus, I. ventalloi, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (n = 6; 14.6%, n = 6; 14.6%, and n = 29; 70.7% respectively) were found and in Madeira I. ricinus and R. sanguineus (n = 78, 98.7%; and n = 1, 1.3%; respectively) were identified. Tick COI markers confirmed species highlighting confirmation of R. sanguineus s.s. and genotype A of I. ventalloi. In the Azores Islands, the detected Rickettsia massiliae was linked to R. sanguineus (dogs and cats) and I. hexagonus (dogs), and in Madeira Island, R. monacensis (dogs) and Hepatozoon silvestris (cats) were found associated with I. ricinus. Further, I. ventalloi presence in the Azores expands west its known range, and Hepatozoon silvestris in Madeira may suggest that I. ricinus could have a role as a potential vector. Finally, as R. massiliae and R. monacensis presence underlines public health risks, surveillance by health authorities is crucial as pathogen-tick interactions may drive disease spread, therefore monitoring remains pivotal for disease prevention.


Assuntos
Babesia , Rickettsia , Animais , Açores , Gatos , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , Babesia/genética , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Babesia/classificação , Cães , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Filogenia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Ixodes/microbiologia , Ixodes/parasitologia , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia , Rhipicephalus sanguineus/microbiologia , Rhipicephalus sanguineus/parasitologia , Coccídios/genética , Coccídios/isolamento & purificação , Coccídios/classificação , Eucoccidiida/genética , Eucoccidiida/isolamento & purificação , Eucoccidiida/classificação
6.
Trop Biomed ; 41(1): 52-63, 2024 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38852134

RESUMO

In tropical regions, numerous tick-borne pathogens (TBPs) play a crucial role as causative agents of infectious diseases in humans and animals. Recently, the population of companion and pet dogs has significantly increased in Vietnam; however, information on the occurrence of TBPs is still limited. The objectives of this investigation were to determine the occurrence rate, risk factors, and phylogenetic characteristics of TBPs in dogs from northern Vietnam. Of 341 blood samples tested by PCR, the total infection of TBPs was 73.9% (252/341). Babesia vogeli (18SrRNA gene - 30.5%) was detected most frequently in studied dogs followed by Rickettsia spp. (OmpA gene - 27%), Anaplasma platys (groEL gene - 22%), Bartonella spp. (16SrRNA - 18.8%), Mycoplasma haemocanis (16SrRNA - 9.4%) and Hepatozoon canis (18SrRNA gene - 1.2%), respectively. All samples were negative for Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophylum. Co-infection was detected in 31.4% of the samples (107/341) of which, A. platys/Bartonella spp. (34/94,10%), Rickettsia spp./B. vogeli (19/94, 5.6%), and M. haemocanis/B. vogeli (19/94, 5.6%) were recorded as the three most frequent two species of co-infection types. Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between TBP infection and several host variables regarding age, breed, and living area in the current study. The recent findings reported herein, for the first time in Vietnam, are essential for local veterinarians when considering the appropriate approaches for diagnosing these diseases. Furthermore, this data can be used to establish control measures for future surveillance and prevention strategies against canine TBPs in Vietnam.


Assuntos
Anaplasma , Babesia , Doenças do Cão , Filogenia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos , Animais , Cães , Vietnã/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Fatores de Risco , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/veterinária , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/parasitologia , Anaplasma/genética , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Babesia/genética , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Feminino , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Bartonella/genética , Bartonella/isolamento & purificação , Bartonella/classificação , Mycoplasma/genética , Mycoplasma/isolamento & purificação , Mycoplasma/classificação , Coinfecção/veterinária , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/parasitologia , Coinfecção/microbiologia
7.
Zhongguo Xue Xi Chong Bing Fang Zhi Za Zhi ; 36(2): 154-158, 2024 Mar 25.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38857958

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of tick-borne rickettsial infections in selected areas of Liupanshui City, Guizhou Province, 2023, so as to provide insights into the management of tick-borne rickettsioses in the city. METHODS: Ticks were captured from the body surface of bovines and sheep in Gaoxing Village, Dashan Township, Liupanshui City, Guizhou Province during the period between April and June, 2023, and tick species were identified using morphological and molecular biological techniques. In addition, tick-borne Rickettsia was identified using a nested PCR assay, including spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR), Coxiella spp., Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., and Orientia spp., and positive amplified fragments were sequenced and aligned with known sequences accessed in the GenBank database. RESULTS: A total of 200 ticks were collected and all tick species were identified as Rhipicephalus microplus. Nestle PCR assay combined with sequencing identified ticks carrying Candidatus Rickettsia jingxinensis (40.50%), Coxiella burnetii (1.50%), and Coxiella-like endosymbionts (27.00%), and Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp. or Orientsia spp. was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: R. microplus carried Candidatus R. jingxinensis, C. burnetii, and Coxiella-like endosymbionts in selected areas of Liupanshui City, Guizhou Province. Intensified monitoring of tickborne rickettsial infections is needed in livestock and humans to reduce the damages caused by rickettsioses.


Assuntos
Rickettsia , Animais , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , China/epidemiologia , Ovinos , Bovinos , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia
8.
Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports ; 52: 101041, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38880564

RESUMO

Tick-borne diseases are important for animal and human health, because they can cause death if not diagnosed and treated early. Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) can cause high morbidity in dog populations. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is among the most virulent infectious in humans; dogs are also susceptible to infection. The aims of this study were to evaluate the presence of Ehrlichia canis and Rickettsia spp. infections in domestic dogs, and to identify tick species parasitizing dogs among urban areas of two municipalities (Sobral and Alcântaras) in the Ceará State, Northeastern Brazil. A total of 208 domiciled dogs was sampled. After clinical evaluation, blood samples and ticks were collected and submitted to Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) targeting E. canis DNA. Serum samples were screened by Indirect Immunofluorescence Assays (IFA) for antibodies against different strains of Rickettsia spp. previously recognized in Brazil. The results of this study indicate the molecular detection of E. canis in the state of Ceará, Brazil, where the proportion of canine infection in Sobral (9.9%) was higher than in Alcântaras (5.6%). Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato was the prevalent tick species infesting the dogs in both municipalities (43.5 and 53.3%, respectively). Our serological results indicate that dogs of the study area were at low risk of exposure to these tick-borne Rickettsia spp. of the spotted fever group. Our study offers epidemiological data of these diseases to better understanding Rickettsiales epidemic and enzootic cycles in the Brazilian semiarid region, improving prevention and control measures.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão , Ehrlichia canis , Ehrlichiose , Rickettsia , Animais , Cães , Brasil/epidemiologia , Ehrlichia canis/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichiose/veterinária , Ehrlichiose/epidemiologia , Ehrlichiose/microbiologia , Masculino , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Feminino , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/veterinária , Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/veterinária , Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia , Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/microbiologia , Prevalência
9.
Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports ; 52: 101044, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38880575

RESUMO

Soft ticks pose significant health risks as vectors of various pathogens. This study explored the spatio-temporal distribution and genetic relationships of the soft tick species Argas persicus infesting domestic hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) across different districts in Pakistan. An examination of 778 hens revealed a notable tick infestation prevalence of 70.82%, with a total of 1299 ticks collected from 551 hens. The overall mean intensity was 2.19 soft ticks per infested chicken, and the overall mean abundance was 1.61 soft ticks per examined hen. Morphological identification confirmed all collected ticks (n = 1210) as A. persicus, comprising 719 males, 333 females, 121 nymphs, and 38 larvae. The Haveli, Muzaffarabad, and Kotli districts had the highest infestation rates, while Bagh had the lowest. Molecular analyses of tick DNA, focusing on 16S rDNA and 12S rDNA sequences, revealed genetic similarities among A. persicus soft ticks from Pakistan and other regions, providing insights into their evolutionary history. Importantly, no Babesia, Rickettsia, or Anaplasma infections were detected in the examined samples. These findings enhance the understanding of soft tick infestation patterns and the genetic diversity of A. persicus in the studied region.


Assuntos
Argas , Galinhas , Filogenia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas , Infestações por Carrapato , Animais , Paquistão/epidemiologia , Galinhas/parasitologia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/parasitologia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/epidemiologia , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia , Feminino , Prevalência , Masculino , Análise Espaço-Temporal , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Babesia/genética , Babesia/classificação , Ninfa , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , RNA Ribossômico 16S/análise , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Larva/classificação
10.
Acta Trop ; 256: 107282, 2024 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38861832

RESUMO

The hard tick clade (Ixodidae) currently comprises 762 species worldwide (266 Prostriata and 496 Metastriata). A quarter of hard ticks are found in the Neotropical region, and 42 species have been documented in Colombia. Ixodidae species are important vectors of pathogens such as bacteria, helminths, protozoa, and viruses. In tick-borne diseases, vertebrate hosts perform an important role in the transmission, maintenance, and spread of pathogens. Colombia ranks sixth among countries with the highest mammal biodiversity, with a total of 548 species, where some of these species may be involved in pathogen transmission cycles with ticks as vectors. This research evaluated the presence of two genera of bacteria (Borrelia and Rickettsia) and the protozoan (Babesia) in ticks and mammals in the Orinoquia region of Colombia, establishing interaction networks. The information comes from 734 mammals (655 wild and 79 domestic), belonging to 59 species. Tick infestation (n = 1,805) was found with 14.85 % (n = 109) of the examined mammals and corresponds to nine tick species confirmed morphologically and molecularly. To detect pathogens 272 ticks were collected while feeding on 96 mammals; samples from 93 mammals were analyzed. The presence of borreliae from the relapsing fever group (RFG) and the Lyme disease group (LDG) were detected. Rickettsia spp. was detected in ticks and mammals, while Babesia bigemina was only detected in ticks. This research is the first to address the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in domestic and wild mammals infested with hard ticks in the Department of Arauca, Colombia. Considering that reporting cases of infections with Babesia, Borrelia, and Rickettsia in Colombia is not mandatory, their impact on public health cannot be estimated. This highlights the importance of continuously detecting, confirming, and identifying these and other important pathogens within the "One Health" framework, as they have a significant economic and medical-veterinary impact globally.


Assuntos
Babesia , Borrelia , Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno , Ixodidae , Mamíferos , Rickettsia , Animais , Colômbia , Mamíferos/parasitologia , Mamíferos/microbiologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Ixodidae/microbiologia , Ixodidae/parasitologia , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Borrelia/isolamento & purificação , Borrelia/patogenicidade , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/transmissão , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/parasitologia
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 121(25): e2406788121, 2024 Jun 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865267

RESUMO

Heritable symbionts are common among animals in nature, but the molecular mechanisms underpinning symbiont invasions of host populations have been elusive. In this study, we demonstrate the spread of Rickettsia in an invasive agricultural pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean (MED), across northeastern China from 2018 to 2023. Here, we show that the beneficial symbiont Rickettsia spreads by manipulating host hormone signals. Our analyses suggest that Rickettsia have been horizontally acquired by B. tabaci MED from another invasive whitefly B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 during periods of coexistence. Rickettsia is transmitted maternally and horizontally from female B. tabaci MED individuals. Rickettsia infection enhances fecundity and results in female bias among whiteflies. Our findings reveal that Rickettsia infection stimulates juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis, in turn enhancing fecundity, copulation events, and the female ratio of the offspring. Consequently, Rickettsia infection results in increased whitefly fecundity and female bias by modulating the JH pathway. More female progeny facilitates the transmission of Rickettsia. This study illustrates that the spread of Rickettsia among invasive whiteflies in northeastern China is propelled by host hormone regulation. Such symbiont invasions lead to rapid physiological and molecular evolution in the host, influencing the biology and ecology of an invasive species.


Assuntos
Fertilidade , Hemípteros , Rickettsia , Razão de Masculinidade , Simbiose , Animais , Rickettsia/fisiologia , Hemípteros/microbiologia , Hemípteros/fisiologia , Feminino , Masculino , Hormônios Juvenis/metabolismo , China
12.
BMC Vet Res ; 20(1): 279, 2024 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38937767

RESUMO

Rickettsia occurs worldwide and rickettsiosis is recognized as an emerging infection in several parts of the world. Ticks are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Rickettsia species in humans and domestic animals. Most pathogenic Rickettsia species belong to the spotted Fever Group (SFG). This study aimed to identify and diagnose tick fauna and investigate the prevalence of Rickettsia spp. in ticks collected from domestic animals and dogs in the rural regions of Kerman Province, Southeast Iran. In this study, tick species (fauna) were identified and 2100 ticks (350 pooled samples) from two genera and species including Rhipicephalus linnaei (1128) and Hyalomma deteritum (972) were tested to detect Rickettsia genus using Real-time PCR. The presence of the Rickettsia genus was observed in 24.9% (95%CI 20.28-29.52) of the pooled samples. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of Rickettsia aeschlimannii (48.98%), Rickettsia conorii israelensis (28.57%), Rickettsia sibirica (20.41%), and Rickettsia helvetica (2.04%) in the positive samples. The results showed a significant association between county variables and the following variables: tick spp. (p < 0.001), Rickettsia genus infection in ticks (p < 0.001) and Rickettsia spp. (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant association between tick species and host animals (dogs and domestic animals) (p < 0.001), Rickettsia spp infection in ticks (p < 0.001), and Rickettsia spp. (p < 0.001). This study indicates a high prevalence of Rickettsia spp. (SFG) in ticks of domestic animals and dogs in rural areas of Kerman Province. The health system should be informed of the possibility of rickettsiosis and the circulating species of Rickettsia in these areas.


Assuntos
Rickettsia , Animais , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Cães , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Filogenia , Ixodidae/microbiologia , Bovinos , Ovinos , Cavalos , Gatos , Feminino , Cabras , Masculino , Doenças dos Bovinos/microbiologia , Doenças dos Bovinos/epidemiologia , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Animais Domésticos , Doenças dos Ovinos/microbiologia , Doenças dos Ovinos/epidemiologia , Carneiro Doméstico
13.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 30(7): 1459-1462, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38916804

RESUMO

Spotted fever rickettsiosis is rarely observed in solid organ transplant recipients, and all previously reported cases have been associated with tick bite months to years after transplantation. We describe a kidney transplant recipient in North Carolina, USA, who had a moderately severe Rickettsia parkeri infection develop during the immediate posttransplant period.


Assuntos
Transplante de Rim , Infecções por Rickettsia , Rickettsia , Humanos , Transplante de Rim/efeitos adversos , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , North Carolina , Infecções por Rickettsia/diagnóstico , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Masculino , Transplantados , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Feminino
14.
Res Vet Sci ; 176: 105316, 2024 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38875889

RESUMO

To improve the knowledge on the role of bats in the maintenance and transmission of tick-borne pathogens, a molecular approach was used to characterize Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., piroplasmids, Hepatozoon spp., flaviviruses and nairoviruses in ticks collected from Iberian bats. A total of 732 bats from 25 species were captured at 38 sampling sites distributed in seven provinces of Spain between 2018 and 2022. Seventy-nine Ixodes simplex ticks were collected from 31 bats (Eptesicus isabellinus, Hypsugo savii, Myotis capaccini, Myotis emarginatus, Myotis myotis, Miniopterus schreibersii, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). Sixty of 79 I. simplex were positive for at least one pathogen tested and were collected from 23 bats captured in southeast Spain. We detected the presence of Rickettsia slovaca in 12 ticks collected from M. emarginatus, H. savii, M. schreibersii and E. isabellinus; Rickettsia aeschlimannii in 1 tick from M. schreibersii; Anaplasma ovis in 3 ticks from H. savii and M. schreibersii; C. burnetii in 2 ticks from H. savii; Occidentia massiliensis in 1 tick from H. savii; piroplasmids in 12 ticks from H. savii, M. schreibersii and E. isabellinus; and a novel nairovirus in 1 tick from M. schreibersii. Furthermore, blood samples obtained from 14 of the 31 tick-infested bats were negative in all PCR analyses. This study describes new host and pathogen associations for the bat-specialist I. simplex, highlights the risk of spread of these pathogens, and encourages further research to understand the role of Iberian bats in the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens.


Assuntos
Quirópteros , Ixodes , Animais , Quirópteros/microbiologia , Quirópteros/virologia , Ixodes/microbiologia , Ixodes/virologia , Espanha/epidemiologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasma/genética , Borrelia burgdorferi/isolamento & purificação , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Coxiella burnetii/isolamento & purificação , Coxiella burnetii/genética
15.
BMC Res Notes ; 17(1): 171, 2024 Jun 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38902784

RESUMO

OBJETIVE: this study was to determine the relationship between acute febrile illness and bacterial pathogens with zoonotic potential that cause emerging and re-emerging diseases in a central-eastern region of Peru. RESULTS: Out of the 279 samples analyzed, 23 (8.2%) tested positive for infection by Rickettsia spp., while a total of 15 (5.4%) tested positive for Leptospira spp. Women had a higher frequency of infection by Rickettsia spp., with 13 cases (53.3%), while men had a higher frequency of infection by Leptospira spp., with 10 cases (66.7%). The most frequently reported general symptom was headache, with 100.0% (n = 23) of patients with Rickettsia (+) and 86.7% (n = 13) of patients with Leptospira (+) experiencing it. Arthralgia was the second most frequent symptom, reported by 95.6% (n = 22) and 60% (n = 9) of patients with Rickettsia (+) and Leptospira (+), respectively. Myalgia was reported by 91.3% (n = 21) and 66.7% (n = 10) of patients with Rickettsia (+) and Leptospira (+), respectively. Retroocular pain, low back pain, and skin rash were also present, but less frequently. Among the positives, no manifestation of bleeding was recorded, although only one positive case for Leptospira spp. presented a decrease in the number of platelets.


Assuntos
Leptospira , Leptospirose , Infecções por Rickettsia , Rickettsia , Humanos , Peru/epidemiologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Masculino , Leptospira/isolamento & purificação , Leptospira/patogenicidade , Leptospirose/epidemiologia , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Leptospirose/complicações , Leptospirose/diagnóstico , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/diagnóstico , Adulto , Animais , Febre/microbiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/diagnóstico , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Mialgia/microbiologia , Mialgia/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem , Adolescente , Cefaleia/microbiologia , Cefaleia/etiologia , Cefaleia/epidemiologia , Artralgia/microbiologia , Artralgia/etiologia
16.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0301685, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38748697

RESUMO

Amblyomma ticks are vectors of both Rickettsia rickettsii and R. parkeri in the Americas, where capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) are the main hosts in urban areas, thus contributing to the transmission of spotted fever. Herein, we studied: (i) the seasonal dynamics and abundance of ticks in areas where capybaras live, (ii) the effect of environmental variables on tick abundance, and (iii) the presence of Rickettsia-infected ticks. Between September 2021 and September 2022, we sampled ticks using cloth-dragging at 194 sites on the shore of Lake Paranoá in Brasília, Brazil. We measured environmental data (season, vegetation type, canopy density, temperature, humidity, and presence or vestige of capybara) at each site. Nymphs and adults were morphologically identified to the species level, and a selected tick sample including larvae was subjected to genotypic identification. We investigated Rickettsia-infected ticks by PCR (gltA, htrA, ompB, and ompA genes) and associations between tick abundance and environmental variables using Generalized Linear Models. A total of 30,334 ticks (96% larvae) were captured. Ticks were identified as Amblyomma, with A. sculptum comprising 97% of the adult/nymphs. Genotype identification of a larval sample confirmed that 95% belonged to A. dubitatum. Seasonal variables showed significant effects on tick abundance. Most larvae and nymphs were captured during the early dry season, while the adults were more abundant during the wet season. Vegetation variables and the presence of capybaras showed no association with tick abundance. Rickettsia parkeri group and R. bellii were identified in A. dubitatum, while A. sculptum presented R. bellii. We conclude that: (i) Amblyomma ticks are widely distributed in Lake Paranoá throughout the year, especially larvae at the dry season, (ii) the abundance of Amblyomma ticks is explained more by climatic factors than by vegetation or presence of capybaras, and (iii) A. dubitatum ticks are potential vectors of R. parkeri in Brasília.


Assuntos
Amblyomma , Rickettsia , Estações do Ano , Animais , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Brasil , Amblyomma/microbiologia , Ninfa/microbiologia , Larva/microbiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/transmissão , Infecções por Rickettsia/microbiologia , Vetores Aracnídeos/microbiologia , Roedores/microbiologia , Roedores/parasitologia , Meio Ambiente
17.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 14: 1384284, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38725451

RESUMO

Japanese spotted fever (JSF) is caused by Rickettsia japonica, mainly vectored by hard ticks. However, whether R. japonica can be transmitted by other arthropods remains unknown. Moreover, it is of interest to investigate whether other Rickettsia species cause spotted fever in endemic areas. In this study, a survey of Rickettsia species was performed in hematophagous arthropods (mosquitoes, tabanids, and ticks) from endemic areas for JSF in Hubei Province, central China. The results showed that the diversity and prevalence of Rickettsia species in mosquitoes are low, suggesting that mosquitoes may not be the vector of zoonotic Rickettsia species. A novel Rickettsia species showed a high prevalence (16.31%, 23/141) in tabanids and was named "Candidatus Rickettsia tabanidii." It is closely related to Rickettsia from fleas and mosquitoes; however, its pathogenicity in humans needs further investigation. Five Rickettsia species were identified in ticks. Rickettsia japonica, the agent of JSF, was detected only in Haemaphysalis longicornis and Haemaphysalis hystricis, suggesting that they may be the major vectors of R. japonica. Notably, two novel species were identified in H. hystricis ticks, one belonging to the spotted fever group and the other potentially belonging to the ancestral group. The latter one named "Candidatus Rickettsia hubeiensis" may provide valuable insight into the evolutionary history of Rickettsia.


Assuntos
Filogenia , Rickettsia , Rickettsiose do Grupo da Febre Maculosa , Animais , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Rickettsia/classificação , China/epidemiologia , Rickettsiose do Grupo da Febre Maculosa/microbiologia , Rickettsiose do Grupo da Febre Maculosa/epidemiologia , Carrapatos/microbiologia , Humanos , Artrópodes/microbiologia , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Culicidae/microbiologia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Doenças Endêmicas , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Sifonápteros/microbiologia
18.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 12336, 2024 05 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38811622

RESUMO

Hard ticks are known vectors of various pathogens, including the severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus, Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Borrelia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Ehrlichia spp. This study aims to investigate the distribution and prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in southwestern Korea from 2019 to 2022. A total of 13,280 ticks were collected during the study period, with H. longicornis accounting for 86.1% of the collected ticks. H. flava, I. nipponensis and A. testudinarium comprised 9.4%, 3.6%, and 0.8% of the ticks, respectively. Among 983 pools tested, Rickettsia spp. (216 pools, 1.6% MIR) were the most prevalent pathogens across all tick species, with R. japonica and R. monacensis frequently detected in I. nipponensis and Haemaphysalis spp., respectively. Borrelia spp. (28 pools, 0.2% MIR) were predominantly detected in I. nipponensis (27 pools, 13.8% MIR, P < 0.001). Co-infections, mainly involving Rickettsia monacensis and Borrelia afzelii, were detected in I. nipponensis. Notably, this study identified R. monacensis for the first time in A. testudinarium in South Korea. These findings offer valuable insights into the tick population and associated pathogens in the region, underscoring the importance of tick-borne disease surveillance and prevention measures.


Assuntos
Rickettsia , Animais , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Carrapatos/microbiologia , Carrapatos/virologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/virologia , Prevalência , Borrelia/isolamento & purificação , Borrelia/genética , Anaplasma phagocytophilum/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichia/genética , Coxiella burnetii/isolamento & purificação , Coxiella burnetii/genética , Phlebovirus/isolamento & purificação , Phlebovirus/genética
19.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 14: 1382228, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38698904

RESUMO

Background: Tick-borne pathogen (TBP) surveillance studies often use whole-tick homogenates when inferring tick-pathogen associations. However, localized TBP infections within tick tissues (saliva, hemolymph, salivary glands, and midgut) can inform pathogen transmission mechanisms and are key to disentangling pathogen detection from vector competence. Methods: We screened 278 camel blood samples and 504 tick tissue samples derived from 126 camel ticks sampled in two Kenyan counties (Laikipia and Marsabit) for Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Coxiella, Rickettsia, Theileria, and Babesia by PCR-HRM analysis. Results: Candidatus Anaplasma camelii infections were common in camels (91%), but absent in all samples from Rhipicephalus pulchellus, Amblyomma gemma, Hyalomma dromedarii, and Hyalomma rufipes ticks. We detected Ehrlichia ruminantium in all tissues of the four tick species, but Rickettsia aeschlimannii was only found in Hy. rufipes (all tissues). Rickettsia africae was highest in Am. gemma (62.5%), mainly in the hemolymph (45%) and less frequently in the midgut (27.5%) and lowest in Rh. pulchellus (29.4%), where midgut and hemolymph detection rates were 17.6% and 11.8%, respectively. Similarly, in Hy. dromedarii, R. africae was mainly detected in the midgut (41.7%) but was absent in the hemolymph. Rickettsia africae was not detected in Hy. rufipes. No Coxiella, Theileria, or Babesia spp. were detected in this study. Conclusions: The tissue-specific localization of R. africae, found mainly in the hemolymph of Am. gemma, is congruent with the role of this tick species as its transmission vector. Thus, occurrence of TBPs in the hemolymph could serve as a predictor of vector competence of TBP transmission, especially in comparison to detection rates in the midgut, from which they must cross tissue barriers to effectively replicate and disseminate across tick tissues. Further studies should focus on exploring the distribution of TBPs within tick tissues to enhance knowledge of TBP epidemiology and to distinguish competent vectors from dead-end hosts.


Assuntos
Babesia , Camelus , Ehrlichia , Theileria , Carrapatos , Animais , Quênia/epidemiologia , Camelus/parasitologia , Camelus/microbiologia , Theileria/isolamento & purificação , Theileria/genética , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Babesia/genética , Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichia/genética , Carrapatos/microbiologia , Carrapatos/parasitologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/parasitologia , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasma/genética , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Coxiella/isolamento & purificação , Coxiella/genética , Hemolinfa/microbiologia , Hemolinfa/parasitologia , Glândulas Salivares/microbiologia , Glândulas Salivares/parasitologia
20.
Vet Parasitol Reg Stud Reports ; 51: 101033, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38772649

RESUMO

The Garrano is a semi-feral horse breed native to several mountains in the northern Iberian Peninsula. Despite being endangered, this unique breed of pony has managed to survive in the wild and continues to be selectively bred, highlighting their remarkable resilience and adaptability to harsh environments. Wildlife plays a critical role in the survival of tick vectors in their natural habitats and the transfer of tick-borne pathogens, as they can serve as reservoir hosts for many agents and amplifiers for these vectors. The semi-feral lifestyle of the Garrano horses makes them particularly vulnerable to exposure to numerous tick species throughout the year. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Babesia, Theileria, and spotted fever rickettsiae in the Garrano horse ticks to obtain a knowledge of circulating agents in this host population. The collected ticks (n = 455) were identified as Rhipicephalus bursa. DNA specimens were organized in pools of 5 ticks, for molecular screening. Pools PCR results confirmed the presence of Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae (n = 12 for the ompB gene, n = 11 for the ompA gene and n = 6 for the gltA gene), Babesia bigemina (n = 1), Babesia caballi (n = 3), Theileria equi (n = 15) and Theileria haneyi (n = 1).These results confirm the circulation of an emerging rickettsial spotted fever group member, Candidatus R. barbariae, in R. bursa ticks. Our findings demonstrated that Candidatus R. barbariae co-circulates with B. bigemina and T. equi, which are vectored by R. bursa. We are reporting for the first time, the detection of T. haneyi among R. bursa ticks feeding in the Garrano horses in Portugal. Surveillance studies for tick-borne infections are essential to provide information that can facilitate the implementation of preventive and control strategies.


Assuntos
Babesia , Doenças dos Cavalos , Rhipicephalus , Theileria , Animais , Cavalos/parasitologia , Portugal/epidemiologia , Rhipicephalus/microbiologia , Rhipicephalus/parasitologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/parasitologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/epidemiologia , Theileria/isolamento & purificação , Theileria/genética , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Babesia/genética , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/veterinária , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/parasitologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Feminino , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Anaplasma/genética , Theileriose/epidemiologia , Theileriose/parasitologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Rickettsia/genética , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Infestações por Carrapato/parasitologia , Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação , Ehrlichia/genética , Babesiose/epidemiologia , Babesiose/parasitologia
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