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1.
Parasite Immunol ; 46(4): e13034, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38625016

RESUMO

Scavenger receptors participate in a wide range of biological functions after binding to multiple non-self or altered self-ligands. Among them, CD5 and CD6 are lymphocyte scavenger receptors known to interact with different microbial-associated molecular patterns, and the administration of the recombinant soluble ectodomains of human CD5 (rshCD5) and/or CD6 (rshCD6) has shown therapeutic/prophylactic potential in experimental models of fungal, bacterial and echinococcal infections. The latter is a zoonosis caused by the larval stage of the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato, which in humans can induce secondary cystic echinococcosis (CE) after the spillage of protoscoleces contained within fertile cysts, either spontaneously or during surgical removal of primary hydatid cysts. Herein, we have analysed the mechanisms behind the significant protection observed in the mouse model of secondary CE following prophylactic administration of rshCD5 or rshCD6. Our results show that both molecules exhibit intrinsic antiparasitic activities in vitro, as well as immunomodulatory functions during early secondary CE, mainly through Th1/Th17 cytokine bias and promotion of peritoneal polyreactive antibodies. These data support the relevance of the parasite components bound by rshCD5 and rshCD6, as well as the potential of their prophylactic administration as a useful strategy to reduce secondary CE in patients.


Assuntos
Anti-Infecciosos , Equinococose , Animais , Camundongos , Humanos , Antiparasitários , Zoonoses , Receptores Depuradores
2.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 18(4): e0012067, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38574113

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Anthrax and brucellosis are endemic national priority zoonotic diseases in Ethiopia. This study assess the possible factors explaining the current limited information available on animal and human cases in pastoral communities. METHODS: Two questionnaire surveys gathered data from 509 pastoralists and 51 healthcare providers between February and April 2019 in five districts of Afar and the Somali region (SRS). RESULTS: Among the 51 healthcare providers, 25 (49%) and 38 (74.5%) had heard of brucellosis, and anthrax, respectively. Of those, only 3 (12%) and 14 (36.8%) knew the symptoms of brucellosis and Anthrax. None of the Health Extension Workers knew any disease symptoms. Healthcare providers recalled two human cases of brucellosis and 39 cases of Anthrax in the last 12 months, based on symptom-based diagnosis. Pastoralists had a moderate level of knowledge about diseases in their animals, with over half (52.4%; n = 267/509) understanding that animals can transmit diseases to people. Overall, 280 out of 508 (55.1%) and 333 out of 507 (65.7%) pastoralists had heard of brucellosis and Anthrax, respectively. Among the latter, 282 (51.3%) knew at least one preventive measure for Anthrax. However, disease knowledge among women was poor. Despite their knowledge, pastoralists engaged in risky unprotected animal handling, animal product consumption/usage as well as husbandry behaviors exposing them to pathogens and favoring the spread of diseases. They identified Anthrax as the most important zoonosis (47.6%) and as one of top three diseases suspected to cause mortality in their livestock. Pastoralists highlighted lack of vaccine coverage, availability and their timely administration. Both, pastoralists and healthcare providers stated the lack of disease awareness and the unavailability of drugs in the market as important challenges. Health facilities lacked protocols and standard operating procedures for managing zoonotic diseases, and did not have access to laboratory confirmation of pathogens. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed significant under-reporting of Anthrax and brucellosis, and weak prevention and response in humans, mostly associated with poor disease knowledge of healthcare providers. Ability to respond to animal outbreaks was limited by vaccine and drugs availability, timely vaccine administration and the mobility of pastoralists.


Assuntos
Antraz , Brucelose , Vacinas , Animais , Humanos , Feminino , Antraz/epidemiologia , Antraz/prevenção & controle , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Somália/epidemiologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Brucelose/epidemiologia , Brucelose/prevenção & controle
3.
Vet Med Sci ; 10(3): e1441, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613179

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Coxiellosis is a neglected zoonosis for occupationally exposed people in many parts of the world. Sheep and goats are two important small ruminants that act as reservoirs for human contamination; however, there is a lack of comprehensive data on the epidemiological aspects of coxiellosis in sheep and goats at regional and global levels. The aim of this study was to systematically review the available articles on seroprevalence of coxiellosis in sheep and goats and estimate the overall seroprevalence in different regions. METHODS: A systematic search strategy was performed in five electronic repositories for articles published until December 2021. Relevant data were extracted from the selected articles based on the inclusion criteria. A random effect meta-analysis model was used to analyse the data. Results are presented as the prevalence of seropositivity as a percentage and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The global pooled seroprevalence of coxiellosis in sheep was 17.38% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.59%-19.17%). Overall, the regional level pooled prevalence estimates in sheep ranged from 15.04% (95% CI: 7.68%-22.40%) to 19.14% (95% CI: 15.51%-22.77%), depending on region. The global pooled seroprevalence of coxiellosis in goats was 22.60% (95% CI: 19.54%-25.66%). Overall, the regional level pooled prevalence estimates in goats ranged from 6.33% (95% CI: 2.96%-9.71%) to 55.13% (95% CI: 49.61%-60.65%), depending on the region. The prevalence estimates also varied significantly in both sheep and goats depending on age, sex, and rearing systems of the animals (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Seroprevalence of coxiellosis in both sheep and goats is considerable. Routine monitoring of the sheep and goat populations is needed to prevent spillover infection in other livestock and humans.


Assuntos
Doenças das Cabras , Doenças dos Ovinos , Ovinos , Humanos , Animais , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Ruminantes , Cabras , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Gado , Doenças das Cabras/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Ovinos/epidemiologia
4.
Rev Med Liege ; 79(4): 208-214, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38602207

RESUMO

We report the case of a patient who has been hospitalized for dyspnea. Investigations revealed airway obstruction, eosinophilia, elevated IgE and elevated exhaled nitric oxide. Patient improved with oral corticosteroids (OCS). However, the patient presented two exacerbations requiring OCS during the next twelve months. Chest CT scan revealed two multiloculated parenchymal lesions. Lab test was positive for Echinococcus and Western-Blot confirmed infection with Echinococcus granulosus. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed the presence of 6 % eosinophils. Echinococcus granulosis is a zoonotic larval infection caused by a tapeworm larva. Patients with this disease may be asymptomatic for years. Early identification and management, in a multidisciplinary team, are essential and rely mainly on surgical intervention and antiparasitic treatments. This article presents the case of a young patient with pulmonary echinococcosis.


Nous rapportons le cas d'un patient ayant été hospitalisé dans un contexte d'obstruction bronchique, avec une légère éosinophilie, une élévation des IgE et du monoxyde d'azote dans l'air exhalé, qui a évolué favorablement sous corticostéroïdes oraux (CSO). L'évolution est marquée par deux exacerbations d'asthme d'évolution favorable sous CSO dans les douze mois de suivi. Une tomodensitométrie thoracique révèle la présence de deux lésions pulmonaires kystiques. Les sérologies infectieuses mettent en évidence une positivité pour l'espèce -Echinococcus et une confirmation pour l'Echinococcus granulosus. Le lavage broncho-alvéolaire retrouve une hyperéosinophilie à 6 %. L'échinococcose kystique est une infection larvaire zoonotique causée par une larve de taenia. Les patients atteints de cette maladie peuvent être asymptomatiques pendant de nombreuses années. Une identification précoce et une prise en charge adéquate, en équipe pluridisciplinaire, sont primordiales et reposent essentiellement sur une intervention chirurgicale et des traitements anti-parasitaires. Cet article présente le cas d'un jeune patient atteint d'une échinococcose kystique pulmonaire.


Assuntos
Asma , Echinococcus granulosus , Eosinofilia , Animais , Humanos , Eosinofilia/complicações , Asma/complicações , Asma/diagnóstico , Eosinófilos , Zoonoses/complicações
5.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 13(1): 28, 2024 Apr 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38610035

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing focus on strengthening One Health capacity building on global level, challenges remain in devising and implementing real-world interventions particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. Recognizing these gaps, the One Health Action Commission (OHAC) was established as an academic community for One Health action with an emphasis on research agenda setting to identify actions for highest impact. MAIN TEXT: This viewpoint describes the agenda of, and motivation for, the recently formed OHAC. Recognizing the urgent need for evidence to support the formulation of necessary action plans, OHAC advocates the adoption of both bottom-up and top-down approaches to identify the current gaps in combating zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance, addressing food safety, and to enhance capacity building for context-sensitive One Health implementation. CONCLUSIONS: By promoting broader engagement and connection of multidisciplinary stakeholders, OHAC envisions a collaborative global platform for the generation of innovative One Health knowledge, distilled practical experience and actionable policy advice, guided by strong ethical principles of One Health.


Assuntos
Saúde Única , Animais , Ásia , Fortalecimento Institucional , Políticas , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle
6.
Vet Med Sci ; 10(3): e1446, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38595033

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cross-border livestock mobility through transhumance is mainly practiced in West African countries for seasonal access to resources and market. Cross-border herds are involved in the dynamic of transboundary animal diseases among them brucellosis taken as model. Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease causing abortion. OBJECTIVES: This study explores the seroprevalence of brucellosis according to mobility and infection spread between Mali and Côte d'Ivoire in the context of seasonal cross-border transhumance. METHODS: From February to April 2021, a transversal serological survey of brucellosis was conducted on 521 cattle from 111 transhumant herds and 283 cattle from 59 sedentary herds, all from Mali. RESULTS: The global individual seroprevalence for Brucella spp. in transhumant and sedentary cattle from Mali was 8.2% (95% CI = 6.0-10.5). At herd level, seroprevalence was 21.2% with a significant variation between transhumant (11.7%) and sedentary (39.0%) herds. For herds in transhumance, cattle seropositivity was associated with a previous infection suspected by herdsmen odds ratio (OR = 4.4; 95% CI = 1.1-18.1) and unknown abortion aetiology (OR = 4.3; 95% CI = 1.0-17.3). The departure region (coming from Sikasso) and previous brucellosis infection or unexplained abortion could be used to predict Brucella infection in transhumant herds with a probability of around 60%. The risk of brucellosis introduction in host regions was high despite the individual animal seroprevalence of 3.6% and a low sale rate in transhumant cattle. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that testing transhumant during border control and survey of cattle markets and sales could improve risk control of the spread of disease at regional scale.


Assuntos
Brucella , Brucelose , Gravidez , Feminino , Animais , Bovinos , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Brucelose/epidemiologia , Brucelose/veterinária , Zoonoses , Fatores de Risco
7.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 57: e00805, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38597526

RESUMO

Streptococcus suis has been widely reported as a pathogen in animals, especially pigs. In terms of human health implications, it has been characterized as a zoonosis associated with the consumption of pork products and occupational exposure, particularly in Southeast Asian countries. Here, we present a rare case of human S. suis infection in Brazil, diagnosed in an older adult swine farmer, a small rural producer residing in the semi-arid region of Bahia, Brazil.


Assuntos
Meningites Bacterianas , Infecções Estreptocócicas , Streptococcus suis , Animais , Humanos , Suínos , Brasil/epidemiologia , Zoonoses , Infecções Estreptocócicas/diagnóstico , Meningites Bacterianas/diagnóstico
9.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1386382, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38585270

RESUMO

Xenotransplantation is emerging as a vital solution to the critical shortage of organs available for transplantation, significantly propelled by advancements in genetic engineering and the development of sophisticated immunosuppressive treatments. Specifically, the transplantation of kidneys from genetically engineered pigs into human patients has made significant progress, offering a potential clinical solution to the shortage of human kidney supply. Recent trials involving the transplantation of these modified porcine kidneys into deceased human bodies have underscored the practicality of this approach, advancing the field towards potential clinical applications. However, numerous challenges remain, especially in the domains of identifying suitable donor-recipient matches and formulating effective immunosuppressive protocols crucial for transplant success. Critical to advancing xenotransplantation into clinical settings are the nuanced considerations of anesthesia and surgical practices required for these complex procedures. The precise genetic modification of porcine kidneys marks a significant leap in addressing the biological and immunological hurdles that have traditionally challenged xenotransplantation. Yet, the success of these transplants hinges on the process of meticulously matching these organs with human recipients, which demands thorough understanding of immunological compatibility, the risk of organ rejection, and the prevention of zoonotic disease transmission. In parallel, the development and optimization of immunosuppressive protocols are imperative to mitigate rejection risks while minimizing side effects, necessitating innovative approaches in both pharmacology and clinical practices. Furthermore, the post-operative care of recipients, encompassing vigilant monitoring for signs of organ rejection, infectious disease surveillance, and psychological support, is crucial for ensuring post-transplant life quality. This comprehensive care highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach involving transplant surgeons, anesthesiologists, immunologists, infectiologists and psychiatrists. The integration of anesthesia and surgical expertise is particularly vital, ensuring the best possible outcomes of those patients undergoing these novel transplants, through safe procedural practices. As xenotransplantation moving closer to clinical reality, establishing consensus guidelines on various aspects, including donor-recipient selection, immunosuppression, as well as surgical and anesthetic management of these transplants, is essential. Addressing these challenges through rigorous research and collective collaboration will be the key, not only to navigate the ethical, medical, and logistical complexities of introducing kidney xenotransplantation into mainstream clinical practice, but also itself marks a new era in organ transplantation.


Assuntos
Anestesia , Transplante de Órgãos , Animais , Humanos , Suínos , Transplante Heterólogo/efeitos adversos , Zoonoses , Rim , Imunossupressores
10.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301195, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38574109

RESUMO

Understanding the evolution of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and its relationship to other coronaviruses in the wild is crucial for preventing future virus outbreaks. While the origin of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic remains uncertain, mounting evidence suggests the direct involvement of the bat and pangolin coronaviruses in the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 genome. To unravel the early days of a probable zoonotic spillover event, we analyzed genomic data from various coronavirus strains from both human and wild hosts. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis was performed using multiple datasets, using strict and relaxed clock evolutionary models to estimate the occurrence times of key speciation, gene transfer, and recombination events affecting the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 and its closest relatives. We found strong evidence supporting the presence of temporal structure in datasets containing SARS-CoV-2 variants, enabling us to estimate the time of SARS-CoV-2 zoonotic spillover between August and early October 2019. In contrast, datasets without SARS-CoV-2 variants provided mixed results in terms of temporal structure. However, they allowed us to establish that the presence of a statistically robust clade in the phylogenies of gene S and its receptor-binding (RBD) domain, including two bat (BANAL) and two Guangdong pangolin coronaviruses (CoVs), is due to the horizontal gene transfer of this gene from the bat CoV to the pangolin CoV that occurred in the middle of 2018. Importantly, this clade is closely located to SARS-CoV-2 in both phylogenies. This phylogenetic proximity had been explained by an RBD gene transfer from the Guangdong pangolin CoV to a very recent ancestor of SARS-CoV-2 in some earlier works in the field before the BANAL coronaviruses were discovered. Overall, our study provides valuable insights into the timeline and evolutionary dynamics of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Quirópteros , Animais , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2/genética , Filogenia , Pangolins/genética , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Teorema de Bayes , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
14.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0295287, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38489285

RESUMO

Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world. The disease is more prevalent in tropical regions where the majority of developing countries are located. Leptospirosis is considered a protean manifestation zoonosis with severity of the disease ranging from a mild febrile illness to a severe and life-threatening illness. Clinical symptoms of leptospirosis overlap with other tropical febrile illnesses. Early, rapid, and definitive diagnosis is important for effective patient management. Since Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based assays are not readily available in most clinical settings, there is a need for an affordable, simple, and rapid diagnostic test. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) were implemented at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, and a prospective study to evaluate RPA for diagnosis of acute phase of leptospirosis was conducted. Results indicate that RPA and qPCR were positive in 81% (98/121) of the total positive and acute clinical samples. Of the 81 positive MAT confirmed patients 60 (74%) and 53 (65%) were positive with qPCR and RPA respectively. Retrospective evaluation revealed a high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity-70% and specificity-87%) of RPA compared to MAT as the reference gold standard. Results further suggest that there is no significant difference between the two assays, qPCR and RPA-SwiftX (P = 0.40). Laboratory procedures for the extraction and detection by qPCR in the laboratory have been optimized to obtain results within 6 hours. However, the RPA-SwiftX method under field conditions took 35 minutes. The RPA-SwiftX method could replace the qPCR which shows similar sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, RPA established under the current study presents a powerful tool for the early and rapid diagnosis of leptospirosis at point-of-care.


Assuntos
Leptospira , Leptospirose , Animais , Humanos , Leptospira/genética , Recombinases , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estudos Prospectivos , Sri Lanka , Leptospirose/diagnóstico , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , Nucleotidiltransferases , Zoonoses , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/métodos , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/métodos
16.
Trends Immunol ; 45(3): 198-210, 2024 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38453576

RESUMO

Bats are among the most diverse mammalian species, representing over 20% of mammalian diversity. The past two decades have witnessed a disproportionate spillover of viruses from bats to humans compared with other mammalian hosts, attributed to the viral richness within bats, their phylogenetic likeness to humans, and increased human contact with wildlife. Unique evolutionary adaptations in bat genomes, particularly in antiviral protection and immune tolerance genes, enable bats to serve as reservoirs for pandemic-inducing viruses. Here, we discuss current limitations and advances made in understanding the role of bats as drivers of pandemic zoonoses. We also discuss novel technologies that have revealed spatial, dynamic, and physiological factors driving virus and host coevolution.


Assuntos
Quirópteros , Vírus , Animais , Humanos , Reservatórios de Doenças , Filogenia , Zoonoses , Mamíferos
17.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 22(1): 37, 2024 Mar 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38520018

RESUMO

The 2022 multi-country Monkeypox (Mpox) outbreak has added concerns to scientific research. However, unanswered questions about the disease remain. These unanswered questions lie in different aspects, such as transmission, the affected community, clinical presentations, infection and prevention control and treatment and vaccination. It is imperative to address these issues to stop the spread and transmission of disease. We documented unanswered questions with Mpox and offered suggestions that could help put health policy into practice. One of those questions is why gay, bisexual or other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) are the most affected community, underscoring the importance of prioritizing this community regarding treatment, vaccination and post-exposure prophylaxis. In addition, destigmatizing gbMSM and implementing community-based gbMSM consultation and action alongside ethical surveillance can facilitate other preventive measures such as ring vaccination to curb disease transmission and track vaccine efficacy. Relevant to that, vaccine and drug side effects have implied the questionability of their use and stimulated the importance of health policy development regarding expanded access and off-label use, expressing the need for safe drug and vaccine development manufacturing. The possibility of reverse zoonotic has also been raised, thus indicating the requirement to screen not only humans, but also their related animals to understand the real magnitude of reverse zoonosis and its potential risks. Implementing infection prevention and control measures to stop the virus circulation at the human-animal interface that includes One Health approach is essential.


Assuntos
Varíola dos Macacos , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Animais , Masculino , Humanos , Homossexualidade Masculina , Política de Saúde , Zoonoses
18.
Life Sci Alliance ; 7(6)2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38514188

RESUMO

Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic strains of the genus Leptospira and is considered the most widespread zoonotic bacterial disease. The genus is characterized by the large number of serology variants, which challenges developing effective serotyping methods and vaccines with a broad spectrum. Because knowledge on the genetic basis of the serological diversity among leptospires is still limited, we aimed to explore the genetic structure and patterns of the rfb locus, which is involved in the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides, the major surface antigen that defines the serovar in leptospires. Here, we used genomic data of 722 pathogenic samples and compared the gene composition of their rfb locus by hierarchical clustering. Clustering analysis showed that the rfb locus gene composition is species-independent and strongly associated with the serological classification. The samples were grouped into four well-defined classes, which cluster together samples either belonging to the same serogroup or from different serogroups but sharing serological affinity. Our findings can assist in the development of new strategies based on molecular methods, which can lead to better tools for serological identification in this zoonosis.


Assuntos
Leptospira , Leptospirose , Animais , Leptospira/genética , Leptospirose/genética , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Sorogrupo , Estruturas Genéticas
19.
Eur J Protistol ; 93: 126066, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38442435

RESUMO

The zoonotic potential of the protist parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in amphibians and reptiles raises public health concerns due to their growing popularity as pets. This review examines the prevalence and diversity of these parasites in wild and captive amphibians and reptiles to better understand the zoonotic risk. Research on Giardia in both groups is limited, and zoonotic forms of Cryptosporidium or Giardia have not been reported in amphibians. Host-adapted Cryptosporidium species dominate in reptiles, albeit some reptiles have been found to carry zoonotic (C. hominis and C. parvum) and rodent-associated (C. tyzzeri, C. muris and C. andersoni) species, primarily through mechanical carriage. Similarly, the limited reports of Giardia duodenalis (assemblages A, B and E) in reptiles may also be due to mechanical carriage. Thus, the available evidence indicates minimal zoonotic risk associated with these organisms in wild and captive frogs and reptiles. The exact transmission routes for these infections within reptile populations remain poorly understood, particularly regarding the importance of mechanical carriage. Although the risk appears minimal, continued research and surveillance efforts are necessary to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the transmission dynamics and ultimately improve our ability to safeguard human and animal health.


Assuntos
Criptosporidiose , Cryptosporidium , Giardia lamblia , Giardíase , Animais , Humanos , Giardíase/epidemiologia , Giardíase/veterinária , Giardíase/parasitologia , Criptosporidiose/epidemiologia , Criptosporidiose/parasitologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Anuros , Répteis , Prevalência , Fezes/parasitologia
20.
Prev Vet Med ; 226: 106166, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38484427

RESUMO

The close relationship between human and companion animals like cats and dogs raises public health concerns regarding the potential transmission of zoonotic diseases in Bangladesh. The study aimed to evaluate the cat and dog owners' knowledge, attitudes, practices, and risk perception concerning zoonotic diseases for designing effective interventions and reducing disease transmission. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 480 pet owners in various region of Bangladesh. For data collection, a structured, closed-ended questions were implemented. The data collection was anonymous and individuals were chosen through a random selection method. Responses were classified to evaluate comprehensive knowledge, using a threshold value of ≥65%. Quantitative score was created to measure Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices, and these scores were divided into categories of good and poor knowledge, positive and negative attitudes, as well as correct and incorrect practices. The analysis included the application of both descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. The findings showed that females made up more than half of the survey participants (55.2%), with the predominant pet owned being cats (73.1%). Overall, only a small portion (21.25%) of the survey respondents demonstrated good knowledge about the topic as measured by a dichotomous outcome. A larger proportion of participants (84.58%) exhibited a positive attitude towards zoonotic diseases. However, when it came to correct practices, about one-third (29.79%) of performed satisfactorily. It is noteworthy that 90.4% of the participants exhibited a high level of understanding regarding the transmission of rabies through dog bites. The knowledge and practices of owners were markedly impacted by their education, occupation, and geographic location. Furthermore, 48.1% identified 'social media' as their primary source of information, and 80.0% regarded vaccination as a preventive measure. The study reveals gaps in knowledge and practices of risks regarding zoonotic diseases among pet owners in Bangladesh. It is crucial to implement focused educational initiatives and preventative measures to effectively tackle gaps in knowledge concerning zoonotic diseases and to avert potential infections.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Feminino , Animais , Humanos , Cães , Gatos , Masculino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Estudos Transversais , Bangladesh/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Inquéritos e Questionários , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle
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