Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 51
Filtrar
1.
Port-au-Prince; PAHO; 2022-09-26. (OPS/HTI/22-0001).
Não convencional em Francês | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-56333

RESUMO

En 2022, l’Organisation panaméricaine de la Santé (OPS) célèbre son 120e anniversaire. L’OPS agit en tant qu’agence de santé spécialisée indépendante du système interaméricain et fournit une coopération technique à ses États Membres pour lutter contre les maladies transmissibles et non transmissibles, ainsi que leurs causes, renforcer les systèmes de santé et répondre aux urgences et aux catastrophes dans l’ensemble de la Région des Amériques. En outre, en sa qualité de Bureau régional pour les Amériques de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, l’OPS participe à l’équipe de pays des Nations Unies et collabore avec d’autres organismes, fonds et programmes des Nations Unies pour contribuer à la réalisation des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) dans les pays de la Région. Au niveau infrarégional, l’OPS travaille avec les mécanismes d’intégration pour positionner la santé et ses déterminants à l’ordre du jour politique. Les rapports annuels par pays 2021 reflètent la coopération technique de l’OPS dans les pays et territoires pour la mise en œuvre des stratégies de coopération par pays, la réponse à leurs besoins et priorités, et le fonctionnement dans le cadre des mandats régionaux et mondiaux de l’OPS et des ODD. Sous le thème général de la riposte à la COVID-19 et la préparation pour l’avenir, ils mettent en évidence les mesures prises par l’OPS face à la pandémie de COVID-19 et ses efforts continus dans des domaines prioritaires tels que les urgences sanitaires, les systèmes et services de santé, les maladies transmissibles, les maladies non transmissibles et la santé mentale, la santé tout au long du parcours de vie et l’équité en santé. Ils fournissent également un résumé financier pour l’exercice biennal 2020-2021.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Haiti
2.
Cureus ; 14(8): e27690, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36072217

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Much to the surprise of the global community, Haiti has had far fewer COVID-19 cases and deaths than initially expected. In this study, we sought to estimate the seroprevalence of COVID-19 in a convenience cohort based in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to elucidate potential reasons for the apparently low burden of COVID-19 in Haiti. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of SARS-CoV-2 antibody prevalence in patients aged one to 89 years old who were seen at the Haiti Adventist Hospital (HAH) laboratory between December 17, 2020, and July 3, 2021, with an order requiring a blood draw. We excluded patients outside of the age range and those who did not verbally consent to the study. We tested residual patient serum samples using the Biosys PlusTM COVID-19 IgM/IgG Rapid Test. FINDINGS: Of 9,740 patients seen by the HAH laboratory from December 2020 to July 2021, 538 consented to have antibody testing and answer survey questions. 529 were included in the final analysis. We excluded nine participants who were aged greater than 89 (n=3), aged less than one (n=2), or had results that were not properly recorded (n=4). Three of the tested patients were repeat testers, with one who had been tested three times. These repeat results were included for a final seroprevalence analysis of 533 samples. In the final participant pool, 142 (26.6%) of 533 samples tested positive for either IgM, IgG, or both antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Adjustment for test sensitivity resulted in an estimated seroprevalence of 28.7% (95% CI 24.9-32.9). We observed significant differences in seroprevalences among age groups, with seroprevalence increasing with age. INTERPRETATION: The SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence in Haiti appears to be greater than the publicly reported statistics by several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, a reduced fatality rate relative to high-income countries points to uncertain factors that may confer immunologic resistance in the Haitian population.

3.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0274760, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36129879

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Haiti's first COVID-19 cases were confirmed on March 18, 2020, and subsequently spread throughout the country. The objective of this study was to describe clinical manifestations of COVID-19 in Haitian outpatients and to identify risk factors for severity of clinical manifestations. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of COVID-19 outpatients diagnosed from March 18-August 4, 2020, using demographic, epidemiological, and clinical data reported to the Ministry of Health (MoH). We used univariate and multivariate analysis, including multivariable logistic regression, to explore the risk factors and specific symptoms related to persons with symptomatic COVID-19 and the severity of symptomatic COVID-19 disease. RESULTS: Of 5,389 cases reported to MOH during the study period, 1,754 (32.5%) were asymptomatic. Amongst symptomatic persons 2,747 (75.6%) had mild COVID-19 and 888 (24.4%) had moderate-to-severe disease; the most common symptoms were fever (69.6%), cough (51.9%), and myalgia (45.8%). The odds of having moderate-to-severe disease were highest among persons with hypertension (aOR = 1.72, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] (1.34, 2.20), chronic pulmonary disease (aOR = 3.93, 95% CI (1.93, 8.17)) and tuberculosis (aOR = 3.44, 95% CI (1.35, 9.14)) compared to persons without those conditions. The odds of having moderate-to-severe disease increased with age but was also seen among children aged 0-4 years (OR: 1.73, 95% CI (0.93, 3.08)), when using 30-39 years old as the reference group. All of the older age groups, 50-64 years, 65-74 years, 75-84 years, and 85+ years, had significantly higher odds of having moderate-to-severe COVID-19 compared with ages 30-39 years. Diabetes was associated with elevated odds of moderate-to-severe disease in bivariate analysis (OR = 2.17, 95% CI (1.58,2.98) but, this association did not hold in multivariable analyses (aOR = 1.22,95%CI (0.86,1.72)). CONCLUSION: These findings from a resource-constrained country highlight the importance of surveillance systems to track emerging infections and their risk factors. In addition to co-morbidities described elsewhere, tuberculosis was a risk factor for moderate-to-severe COVID-19 disease.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Adulto , Idoso , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 77, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36132278

RESUMO

Background: Migrant and seasonal farmworkers face enormous barriers to health and have been a particularly vulnerable population during the COVID-19 pandemic, but their pandemic experiences and potential inequities have not been well studied. Objectives: We aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 in Immokalee, Florida, a community with a significant population of migrant and seasonal farmworkers. We evaluated for differences in pandemic experience by language, a known barrier to healthcare, to inform and strengthen future public health efforts. Methods: First, to estimate the burden of COVID in the area, we conducted a descriptive analysis of data on COVID-19 deaths for Collier County from May-August 2020. We then surveyed a cross-sectional, randomized representative sample of 318 adults living in Immokalee from March-November 2020 to assess socio-demographics, workplace conditions, sources of information, ability to follow guidelines, and experiences with testing and contact tracing programs. Results were compared across language groups. Findings: Average excess mortality in Collier County was 108%. The majority surveyed in Immokalee had socio-demographic factors associated with higher COVID risk. Non-English speakers had higher workplace risk due to less ability to work from home. Haitian Creole speakers were less likely to be tested, though all participants were willing to get symptomatic testing and quarantine. Those participants who tested positive or had COVID-19 exposures had low engagement with the contact tracing program, and Spanish-speakers reported lower quality of contact tracing than English speakers. Conclusions: The community of Immokalee, FL is a vulnerable population that suffered disproportionate deaths from COVID-19. This study reveals language inequities in COVID testing and contact tracing that should be targeted in future pandemic response in Immokalee and other migrant farmworker communities.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Migrantes , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Teste para COVID-19 , Busca de Comunicante , Estudos Transversais , Fazendeiros , Florida/epidemiologia , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias
5.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(8)2022 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36011085

RESUMO

Low-income countries, such as Haiti, are facing challenges in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic due to resource shortages and fragile healthcare systems. This study assessed the functional capacity and preparedness of the Haitian healthcare system regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. It employed a narrative review approach to analyze secondary data and used the Donabedian model and the global health security index as the theoretical frameworks to evaluate preparedness. The findings reveal that Haiti faces challenges in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic due to a lack of biosafety and biosecurity regulations, inadequate laboratory systems for COVID-19 testing, and shortages of human resources and personal protective equipment. Moreover, poverty remains widespread, and people lack access to clean water and sanitation services, resulting in a high risk of COVID-19 infection. Furthermore, a lack of communication, rumors, the circulation of fake news regarding COVID-19, and stigmatization cause distrust and reduce the number of people seeking healthcare services. Haiti faces challenges with respect to tackling the pandemic. The Haitian government can strengthen and improve the capacity of the healthcare system to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and infectious diseases emerging in the future.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36011611

RESUMO

This paper explores the migration experiences, perceived COVID-19 impacts, and depression symptoms among Haitian migrants living in Santiago, Chile. Ninety-five participants from eight neighborhoods with a high density of Haitian migrants were recruited. Descriptive statistics, univariate analysis, and logistic regression analysis were conducted. Chi-squared tests were used to confirm univariate results. We found that 22% of participants had major depressive symptoms based on the CESD-R-20 scale, 87% reported major life changes due to COVID-19, and 78% said their migration plans had changed due to the pandemic. Factors associated with more depressive symptoms were being in debt (OR = 3.43) and experiencing discrimination (ORs: 0.60 to 6.19). Factors associated with less odds of depressive symptoms were social support (ORs: 0.06 to 0.25), change in migration plans due to COVID-19 (OR = 0.30), and planning to leave Chile (OR = 0.20). After accounting for relevant factors, planning to leave Chile is significantly predictive of fewer symptoms of depression. Haitian migrants living in Chile had a high prevalence of depression. Planning to leave Chile was a significant protector against depressive symptoms. Future studies should explore how nuanced experiences of uncertainty play out in migrants' lives, mental well-being, and planning for their future.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Migrantes , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Chile/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos
7.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273482, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36006976

RESUMO

Few data are available on frequency of SARS-CoV-2 infection among very young children in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), with the studies that are available biased towards higher income countries with low reported infection and seroconversion rates. Between February 2019 and March 2021, 388 dried blood spot (DBS) samples were obtained from 257 children less than 30 months of age as part of a prospective observational cohort study of pregnant women and their infants in Haiti; longitudinal samples were available for 107 children. In a subsequent retrospective analysis, DBS samples were tested by ELISA for antibody targeting the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein. Over the course of the study, 16·7% of the infants became seropositive. All seropositive samples were collected after March 19, 2020 (the date of the first reported COVID-19 case in Haiti) with the highest hazards measured in August 2020. Sampling date was the only covariate associated with the hazard of seroconversion. Our data provide an estimate of SARS-CoV-2 infection rates among very young children without prior SARS-CoV-2 exposure during the initial pandemic waves in Haiti, and demonstrate that these children mount a detectable serological response which is independent of patient age.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Anticorpos Antivirais , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Imunoglobulina G , Lactente , Gravidez , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Linacre Q ; 89(2): 178-183, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35619885

RESUMO

Understanding the resource limitations in developing countries, a community health worker (CHW) project was developed to help educate, provide materials, and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Haiti. CHWs have shown to be an evidence-driven alternative in resource-limited settings. Pwojé Bon Vwazen (The Good Neighbor Project) took place from May 2020 to September 2020 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Through the project, 9 CHWs were trained. The project had two coordinators in Haiti. The CHWs, over the period of 4 months, were able to reach 1350 individuals and provide them with education regarding spread and prevention of COVID-19 and distribute materials including soap, hand sanitizers, and masks which were sewn in Haiti. Access to affordable health care presents a unique challenge in resource-limited countries. Training of CHWs and implementation of a CHW program can be an alternative in certain situations.

9.
ATS Sch ; 3(1): 112-124, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35634008

RESUMO

Background: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an important component of respiratory therapy for a range of cardiopulmonary conditions. The World Health Organization recommends NIV use to decrease the use of intensive care unit resources and improve outcomes among patients with respiratory failure during periods of high patient capacity from coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, healthcare providers in many low- and middle-income countries, including Haiti, do not have experience with NIV. We conducted NIV training and evaluation in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Objectives: To design and implement a multimodal NIV training program in Haiti that would improve confidence and knowledge of NIV use for respiratory failure. Methods: In January 2021, we conducted a 3-day multimodal NIV training consisting of didactic sessions, team-based learning, and multistation simulation for 36 Haitian healthcare workers. The course included 5 didactic session and 10 problem-based and simulation sessions. All course material was independently created by the study team on the basis of Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education-approved content and review of available evidence. All participants completed pre- and post-training knowledge-based examinations and confidence surveys, which used a 5-point Likert scale. Results: A total of 36 participants were included in the training and analysis, mean age was 39.94 years (standard deviation [SD] = 9.45), and participants had an average of 14.32 years (SD = 1.21) of clinical experience. Most trainees (75%, n = 27) were physicians. Other specialties included nursing (19%, n = 7), nurse anesthesia (3%, n = 1), and respiratory therapy (3%, n = 1). Fifty percent (n = 18) of participants stated they had previous experience with NIV. The majority of trainees (77%) had an increase in confidence survey score; the mean confidence survey score increased significantly after training from 2.75 (SD = 0.77) to 3.70 (SD = 0.85) (P < 0.05). The mean knowledge examination score increased by 39.63% (SD = 15.99%) after training, which was also significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This multimodal NIV training, which included didactic, simulation, and team-based learning, was feasible and resulted in significant increases in trainee confidence and knowledge with NIV. This curriculum has the potential to provide NIV training to numerous low- and middle-income countries as they manage the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and rising burden of noncommunicable disease. Further research is necessary to ensure the sustainability of these improvements and adaptability to other low- and middle-income settings.

10.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(5): 2050121, 2022 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35349382

RESUMO

COVID-19 vaccination is an effective intervention preventing individuals from contracting SARS-CoV-2 or transmitting the virus to others. However, in many countries, vaccine hesitancy has impeded the progress of mass vaccination to reach herd immunity. This study aimed to understand the similarities and differences in the determinants of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Taiwan, the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. A qualitative study was conducted by face-to-face interviews with participants in Taiwan and remote online interviews with participants in the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. In total, 47 interviews were conducted. A reflective thematic analysis was employed to analyze the collected data. Distrust of COVID-19 vaccines was reported by the participants in all countries. A perception of a lack of necessity or urgency to be vaccinated was reported by the Taiwanese and Haitian participants. Lack of knowledge regarding COVID-19 vaccines was reported by the Taiwanese, U.S. and Haitian participants, contributing to hesitation or refusal to vaccination. Regarding misinformation and rumors, misinformation was found among a few Taiwanese and Dutch participants. Additionally, rumors concerning COVID-19 vaccines were mentioned by the Dutch and Haitian participants. Furthermore, a lack of verified information was reported by the participants in all four countries. Overall, the current study suggests that vaccine hesitancy exists among participants in Taiwan, the United States, the Netherlands, and Haiti. Building trust in the COVID-19 vaccine, cultivating vaccine literacy, clarifying misinformation and rumors concerning COVID-19 vaccines, and providing verified information are critical for increasing public acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Vacinas , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Países Baixos , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan , Confiança , Estados Unidos , Vacinação , Hesitação Vacinal
11.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 340, 2022 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35291985

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Since climate change, pandemics and population mobility are challenging healthcare systems, an empirical and integrative research to studying and help improving the health systems resilience is needed. We present an interdisciplinary and mixed-methods research protocol, ClimHB, focusing on vulnerable localities in Bangladesh and Haiti, two countries highly sensitive to global changes. We develop a protocol studying the resilience of the healthcare system at multiple levels in the context of climate change and variability, population mobility and the Covid-19 pandemic, both from an institutional and community perspective. METHODS: The conceptual framework designed is based on a combination of Levesque's Health Access Framework and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's Resilience Framework to address both outputs and the processes of resilience of healthcare systems. It uses a mixed-method sequential exploratory research design combining multi-sites and longitudinal approaches. Forty clusters spread over four sites will be studied to understand the importance of context, involving more than 40 healthcare service providers and 2000 households to be surveyed. We will collect primary data through questionnaires, in-depth and semi-structured interviews, focus groups and participatory filming. We will also use secondary data on environmental events sensitive to climate change and potential health risks, healthcare providers' functioning and organisation. Statistical analyses will include event-history analyses, development of composite indices, multilevel modelling and spatial analyses. DISCUSSION: This research will generate inter-disciplinary evidence and thus, through knowledge transfer activities, contribute to research on low and middle-income countries (LMIC) health systems and global changes and will better inform decision-makers and populations.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Projetos de Pesquisa , Bangladesh/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias
12.
Fam Process ; 2022 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35272392

RESUMO

We examine how juvenile justice-involved youth of Haitian descent in Miami-Dade County cope with structural racism and its impact on their mental health. Drawing on longitudinal ethnography, psychosocial assessment data, and a family-based clinical intervention funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, this article explores youth narratives of discrimination prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We use critical race theory and theory of practice to understand youths' perceptions as racialized bodies and stigmatized selves, highlighting the experiences and perspectives of a particular black immigrant group, ethnic beings caught up in the everyday practices of racialization, sociocultural marginalization, and racism. We frame these experiences as a variation of the complex continuum of structural racism and racial domination in the US. These experiences have caused anger, fear, anxiety, chronic anticipatory distress, and hopelessness among youth of Haitian descent. We conclude with some recommendations for therapeutic support that encourages youth to process their experiences, promotes their development of a positive self-concept, and provides them with mind-body techniques to attenuate the physical impacts of discriminatory events. The clinical trial registration number for this study intervention is NCT03876171.

13.
J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care ; 21: 23259582221084536, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35243926

RESUMO

The Ryan White Program (RWP) in Miami-Dade County, Florida made several modifications to keep HIV care accessible during the COVID-19 Pandemic, including expanding telehealth services, increasing access to HIV medications, and waiving required lab tests for service recertification. We assessed ease of access to medical providers, medical case managers, and antiretroviral medications during the COVID-19 Pandemic among 298 Non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and Haitian people with HIV (PWH) served by the RWP Part A, Miami-Dade County, Florida using a telephone-administered survey between October 2020 and January 2021. Overall, most clients reported similar or better access compared to before the Pandemic. Use of videocalls to communicate with HIV medical providers varied by race/ethnicity: Hispanics (49.6%), Non-Hispanic Blacks (37.7%), and Haitian clients (16.0%). Results suggest the modifications helped maintain access to care during an unprecedented health crisis. Permanently adopting many of these modifications should be considered to continue to facilitate access to care.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Infecções por HIV , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Minorias Étnicas e Raciais , Etnicidade , Florida/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Grupos Minoritários , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(2): 115-126C, 2022 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35125536

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in vaccination of children younger than 1 year during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic (March 2020-August 2021) in Haiti, Lesotho, Liberia and Malawi. METHODS: We used data from health management information systems on vaccination of children aged 12 months or younger in districts supported by Partners In Health. We used data from January 2016 to February 2020 and a linear model with negative binomial distribution to estimate the expected immunization counts for March 2020-August 2021 with 95% prediction intervals, assuming no pandemic. We compared these expected levels with observed values and estimated the immunization deficits or excesses during the pandemic months. FINDINGS: Baseline vaccination counts varied substantially by country, with Lesotho having the lowest count and Haiti the highest. We observed declines in vaccination administration early in the COVID-19 pandemic in Haiti, Lesotho and Liberia. Continued declines largely corresponded to high rates of COVID-19 infection and discrete stock-outs. By August 2021, vaccination levels had returned to close to or above expected levels in Haiti, Liberia and Lesotho; in Malawi levels remained below expected. CONCLUSION: Patterns of childhood immunization coverage varied by country over the course of the pandemic, with significantly lower than expected vaccination levels seen in one country during subsequent COVID-19 waves. Governments and health-care stakeholders should monitor vaccine coverage closely and consider interventions, such as community outreach, to avoid or combat the disruptions in childhood vaccination.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Criança , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Imunização , Programas de Imunização , Lactente , Lesoto/epidemiologia , Libéria/epidemiologia , Malaui/epidemiologia , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Vacinação
15.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(11): 2057-2060, 2022 06 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34471930

RESUMO

After an initial wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Haiti in summer 2020 (primarily lineage B.1), seropositivity for anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunoglobulin G (IgG) was ~40%. Variant P.1 (gamma) was introduced in February 2021, with an initially limited introduction followed by exponential local dissemination within this unvaccinated population with prior exposure to earlier SARS-CoV-2 lineages.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Teste para COVID-19 , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2/genética
16.
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot ; 29(1): 66-75, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34758707

RESUMO

Considering the recent sociopolitical and environmental stress in Haiti, from the COVID pandemic to repeated natural disasters, we aimed to identify risk and protective factors associated with childhood physical violence (CPV) after the 2010 earthquake. A population-based national survey was administered to 13-24-year-old Haitians in 2012. A three-stage clustered sample design was utilized. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and risk ratios (aRR). 64% of survey respondents experienced CPV were estimated. Respondents who reported emotional and/or sexual abuse prior to age 12 were twice as likely to be victims of physical violence later during childhood (emotional aRR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.7; sexual aRR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.1). Feeling close or very close to one's mother was protective (aPR 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92). This study is the first to describe risk and protective factors and also delineate temporality of exposures associated with CPV.Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/17457300.2021.1996398.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Abuso Físico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco
17.
MEDICC Rev ; 24(1): 19-20, 2022 01 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34653117

RESUMO

Soaring summer temperatures, systematic urban and political violence, unreliable infrastructure-power outages, water shortages, sporadic transportation and interruption of other basic services-plus the illness, death and economic straits wrought by COVID-19, are what Haitians awake to every day. On the morning of August 14, 2021, they also woke to the earth in the throes of violent, lethal convulsions caused by a 7.2-magnitude earthquake, along the same fault line responsible for the devastating 2010 disaster and stronger still. As if this weren't enough, Tropical Storm Grace was bearing down on the nation, about to dump biblical amounts of rain on the heels of Tropical Storm Fred. When the Haitian President was assassinated on July 7, Haiti still had not received a single dose of any COVID-19 vaccine-indeed, it was the last country in the Americas to receive vaccines. Later that month, 500,000 doses arrived in the country, donated by the United States via COVAX, the WHO-led initiative to assure at least some vaccines reached low- and middle-income countries. In Haiti, getting those vaccines into the arms of the population is beset by cold chain, distribution and bureaucratic problems, and compounded by widespread vaccine hesitancy; when the earthquake struck, only 14,074 of those doses had been administered.[1,2] Suddenly there was a new, more urgent tragedy, the earthquake leaving thousands of dead, injured and displaced-perhaps hundreds of thousands once the real tally emerges. As in the 2010 quake, the doctors, nurses and technicians comprising Cuba's medical team in Haiti-a commitment Cuba has maintained with its Caribbean neighbor since 1998-were among the first responders. The 2010 relief effort included an additional 1500 health professionals and specialists from Cuba's Henry Reeve Emergency Medical Contingent. Just 24 hours after the August 14th quake, MEDICC Review spoke by phone with Dr Luis Orlando Oliveros-Serrano in Port-au-Prince, where he coordinates Cuba's medical team in Haiti. His disaster response experience had already taken him to Haiti twice before and to Pakistan, Bolivia and beyond.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Socorristas , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , Cuba , Haiti , Humanos , Masculino , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos
18.
Nature ; 600(7887): 133-137, 2021 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34789872

RESUMO

Coronaviruses have caused three major epidemics since 2003, including the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. In each case, the emergence of coronavirus in our species has been associated with zoonotic transmissions from animal reservoirs1,2, underscoring how prone such pathogens are to spill over and adapt to new species. Among the four recognized genera of the family Coronaviridae, human infections reported so far have been limited to alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses3-5. Here we identify porcine deltacoronavirus strains in plasma samples of three Haitian children with acute undifferentiated febrile illness. Genomic and evolutionary analyses reveal that human infections were the result of at least two independent zoonoses of distinct viral lineages that acquired the same mutational signature in the genes encoding Nsp15 and the spike glycoprotein. In particular, structural analysis predicts that one of the changes in the spike S1 subunit, which contains the receptor-binding domain, may affect the flexibility of the protein and its binding to the host cell receptor. Our findings highlight the potential for evolutionary change and adaptation leading to human infections by coronaviruses outside of the previously recognized human-associated coronavirus groups, particularly in settings where there may be close human-animal contact.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Deltacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Suínos/virologia , Zoonoses Virais/epidemiologia , Zoonoses Virais/virologia , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Animais , Teorema de Bayes , Criança , Chlorocebus aethiops , Sequência Conservada , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Deltacoronavirus/classificação , Deltacoronavirus/genética , Deltacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Feminino , Haiti/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Moleculares , Mutação , Filogenia , Células Vero , Zoonoses Virais/sangue
19.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2021 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34718467

RESUMO

We isolated a novel coronavirus from a medical team member presenting with fever and malaise after travel to Haiti. The virus showed 99.4% similarity with a recombinant canine coronavirus recently identified in a pneumonia patient in Malaysia, suggesting that infection with this virus and/or recombinant variants occurs in multiple locations.

20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34596889

RESUMO

Haitians are the fourth largest Afro-Caribbean immigrant group in the USA, and there is a dearth of research focusing on the factors impacting their lives. As a marginalized group with extensive pre-existing conditions, Haitian immigrants are disproportionately affected by the pandemic in areas such as education, health, and economics. This paper provides a summary of existing disparities among Haitians in the USA and how COVID-19 has significantly impacted this group. It concludes with an analysis of how the Strategic Framework for Improving Racial and Ethnic Minority Health and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities can be used to guide, organize, and coordinate systematic planning for sustainable changes to address these disparities. Addressing immigrant and minority health in the USA requires a deeper dive into the various immigrant groups. This paper concludes with recommendations for research and policy changes necessary to eliminate disparities in the USA.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...