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The Influence of Simulated Sunlight on the Inactivation of Influenza Virus in Aerosols.
Schuit, Michael; Gardner, Sierra; Wood, Stewart; Bower, Kristin; Williams, Greg; Freeburger, Denise; Dabisch, Paul.
Afiliação
  • Schuit M; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Gardner S; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Wood S; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Bower K; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Williams G; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Freeburger D; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
  • Dabisch P; National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Operated by BNBI for the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, Frederick, MD, USA.
J Infect Dis ; 221(3): 372-378, 2020 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31778532
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Environmental parameters, including sunlight levels, are known to affect the survival of many microorganisms in aerosols. However, the impact of sunlight on the survival of influenza virus in aerosols has not been previously quantified.

METHODS:

The present study examined the influence of simulated sunlight on the survival of influenza virus in aerosols at both 20% and 70% relative humidity using an environmentally controlled rotating drum aerosol chamber.

RESULTS:

Measured decay rates were dependent on the level of simulated sunlight, but they were not significantly different between the 2 relative humidity levels tested. In darkness, the average decay constant was 0.02 ± 0.06 min-1, equivalent to a half-life of 31.6 minutes. However, at full intensity simulated sunlight, the mean decay constant was 0.29 ± 0.09 min-1, equivalent to a half-life of approximately 2.4 minutes.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results are consistent with epidemiological findings that sunlight levels are inversely correlated with influenza transmission, and they can be used to better understand the potential for the virus to spread under varied environmental conditions.

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Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: J Infect Dis Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: Estados Unidos