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Targeted grazing reduces a widespread wetland plant invader with minimal nutrient impacts, yet native community recovery is limited.
Rohal, Christine B; Duncan, Brittany; Follstad Shah, Jennifer; Veblen, Kari E; Kettenring, Karin M.
Afiliação
  • Rohal CB; Department of Environmental Horticulture and Soil, Water, and Ecosystem Sciences Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA; Department of Watershed Sciences and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322, USA. Electronic address: christine.rohal@ufl.edu.
  • Duncan B; Department of Watershed Sciences and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322, USA; Utah Department of Agriculture and Food, Taylorsville, UT, 84129, USA.
  • Follstad Shah J; School of the Environment, Society & Sustainability, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA.
  • Veblen KE; Department of Wildland Resources and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322, USA.
  • Kettenring KM; Department of Watershed Sciences and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322, USA.
J Environ Manage ; 362: 121168, 2024 Jun.
Article em En | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38823302
ABSTRACT
Targeted grazing to control undesirable plant species is increasingly of interest across a diversity of ecosystems, particularly as an alternative or complement to widely used herbicides. However, there are limited comprehensive evaluations of targeted grazing that evaluate both invasive species management effectiveness and potential negative effects on the ecosystem. Phragmites australis, a tall-statured, dense perennial invasive grass from Eurasia, is a pervasive problem in wetlands across the North American continent. As with many invasive species where management has historically relied on herbicides and resistance is a growing concern, land managers seek viable alternatives that have minimal negative ecosystem impacts. Grazing has been used for millennia to manage native Phragmites in Europe. Similarly, in its invasive range within North America, small-scale studies suggest Phragmites may be suppressed by grazers. Yet, the effectiveness of grazing at large scales and its effects on broader ecosystem properties remain largely unknown. We evaluated the influence of targeted grazing on vegetation, soil nutrients, and water nutrients over two years in large plots (∼300x the size of previous studies). We also tested the effects of mowing, a treatment that can be used to facilitate grazer access to large, dense Phragmites stands. In line with our predictions, we found that cattle grazing effectively suppressed invasive Phragmites over two years. Mowing reduced litter, and moderately reduced standing dead Phragmites, both of which suppress native plant germination in this system. However, these reductions in Phragmites were not accompanied by indications of native plant community recovery, as we had optimistically predicted. Despite the potential for grazing to reduce nutrient sequestration by plants and fertilize soils, we were surprised to find no clear negative effects of grazing on nutrient mobilization to groundwater or floodwater. Taken together, our findings indicate that targeted grazing, when implemented at broad scales over short time frames, is effective at achieving invasive plant management goals without sizable nutrient impacts. However, additional steps will be needed to achieve the restoration of diverse, robust native plant communities.
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Texto completo: 1 Coleções: 01-internacional Base de dados: MEDLINE Assunto principal: Áreas Alagadas / Espécies Introduzidas Limite: Animals Idioma: En Revista: J Environ Manage Ano de publicação: 2024 Tipo de documento: Article

Texto completo: 1 Coleções: 01-internacional Base de dados: MEDLINE Assunto principal: Áreas Alagadas / Espécies Introduzidas Limite: Animals Idioma: En Revista: J Environ Manage Ano de publicação: 2024 Tipo de documento: Article
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