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1.
BMJ Open ; 14(2): e075066, 2024 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38307538

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Like many countries, England has a national shortage of registered nurses. Employers strive to retain existing staff, to ease supply pressures. Disproportionate numbers of nurses leave the National Health Services (NHS) both early in their careers, and later, as they near retirement age. Research is needed to understand the job preferences of early-career and late-career nurses working in the NHS, so tailored policies can be developed to better retain these two groups. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will collect job preference data for early-career and late-career NHS nurses, respectively using two separate discrete choice experiments (DCEs). Findings from the literature, focus groups, academic experts and stakeholder discussions will be used to identify and select the DCE attributes (ie, job features) and levels. We will generate an orthogonal, fractional factorial design using the experimental software Ngene. The DCEs will be administered through online surveys distributed by the regulator Nursing and Midwifery Council. For each group, we expect to achieve a final sample of 2500 registered NHS nurses working in England. For early-career nurses, eligible participants will be registered nurses who graduated in the preceding 5 years (ie, 2019-2023). Eligible participants for the late-career survey will be registered nurses aged 55 years and above. We will use conditional and mixed logit models to analyse the data. Specifically, study 1 will estimate the job preferences of early-career nurses and the possible trade-offs. Study 2 will estimate the retirement preferences of late-career NHS nurses and the potential trade-offs. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The research protocol was reviewed and approved by the host research organisation Ethics Committees Research Governance (University of Southampton, number 80610) (https://www.southampton.ac.uk/about/governance/regulations-policies/policies/ethics). The results will be disseminated via conference presentations, publications in peer-reviewed journals and annual reports to key stakeholders, the Department of Health and Social Care, and NHS England/Improvement retention leaders. REGISTRATION DETAILS: Registration on OSF http://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/RDN9G.


Assuntos
Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Medicina Estatal , Humanos , Grupos Focais , Projetos de Pesquisa , Inglaterra
2.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0298391, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38421985

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: A positive work environment (WE) is paramount for healthcare employees to provide good quality care. To stimulate a positive work environment, employees' perceptions of the work environment need to be assessed. This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Dutch version of the Culture of Care Barometer (CoCB-NL) survey in hospitals. METHODS: This longitudinal validation study explored content validity, structural validity, internal consistency, hypothesis testing for construct validity, and responsiveness. The study was conducted at seven departments in two Dutch university hospitals. The departments were included based on their managers' motivation to better understand their employees' perception of their WE. All employees of participating departments were invited to complete the survey (n = 1,730). RESULTS: The response rate was 63.2%. The content of the CoCB-NL was considered relevant and accessible by the respondents. Two factor models were found. First, confirmative factor analysis of the original four-factor structure showed an acceptable fit (X2 2006.49; df 399; p = <0.001; comparative fit index [CFI] 0.82; Tucker-Lewis index [TLI] 0.80; root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] 0.09). Second, explanatory factor analysis revealed a five-factor model including 'organizational support', 'leadership', 'collegiality and teamwork', 'relationship with manager', and 'employee influence and development'. This model was confirmed and showed a better fit (X2 1552.93; df 395; p = < 0.00; CFI 0.87; TLI 0.86; RMSEA 0.07). Twelve out of eighteen hypotheses were confirmed. Responsiveness was assumed between the measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The CoCB-NL is a valid and reliable instrument for identifying areas needing improvement in the WE. Furthermore, the CoCB-NL appears to be responsive and therefore useful for longitudinal evaluations of healthcare employees' work environments.


Assuntos
Etnicidade , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Hospitais Universitários , Atenção à Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários , Psicometria
3.
J Adv Nurs ; 2023 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37986547

RESUMO

AIM: To evaluate the impact of usual care plus a fundamental nursing care guideline compared to usual care only for patients in hospital with COVID-19 on patient experience, care quality, functional ability, treatment outcomes, nurses' moral distress, patient health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness. DESIGN: Parallel two-arm, cluster-level randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Between 18th January and 20th December 2021, we recruited (i) adults aged 18 years and over with COVID-19, excluding those invasively ventilated, admitted for at least three days or nights in UK Hospital Trusts; (ii) nurses caring for them. We randomly assigned hospitals to use a fundamental nursing care guideline and usual care or usual care only. Our patient-reported co-primary outcomes were the Relational Aspects of Care Questionnaire and four scales from the Quality from the Patient Perspective Questionnaire. We undertook intention-to-treat analyses. RESULTS: We randomized 15 clusters and recruited 581 patient and 418 nurse participants. Primary outcome data were available for 570-572 (98.1%-98.5%) patient participants in 14 clusters. We found no evidence of between-group differences on any patient, nurse or economic outcomes. We found between-group differences over time, in favour of the intervention, for three of our five co-primary outcomes, and a significant interaction on one primary patient outcome for ethnicity (white British vs. other) and allocated group in favour of the intervention for the 'other' ethnicity subgroup. CONCLUSION: We did not detect an overall difference in patient experience for a fundamental nursing care guideline compared to usual care. We have indications the guideline may have aided sustaining good practice over time and had a more positive impact on non-white British patients' experience of care. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROFESSION AND/OR PATIENT CARE: We cannot recommend the wholescale implementation of our guideline into routine nursing practice. Further intervention development, feasibility, pilot and evaluation studies are required. IMPACT: Fundamental nursing care drives patient experience but is severely impacted in pandemics. Our guideline was not superior to usual care, albeit it may sustain good practice and have a positive impact on non-white British patients' experience of care. REPORTING METHOD: CONSORT and CONSERVE. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Patients with experience of hospitalization with COVID-19 were involved in guideline development and writing, trial management and interpretation of findings.

4.
Future Healthc J ; 10(1): 3-6, 2023 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37786501

RESUMO

10 years on from the publication of the Francis report, the nursing profession is facing unprecedented challenges; Robert Francis has recently sounded the alarm that the NHS is currently facing 'the Mid Staffordshire scandal playing out on a national level'. In this perspective, we consider the opportunities missed in the last decade in the attempt to secure safe staffing in nursing.

5.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 147: 104586, 2023 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37672970

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether implicit or explicit, professional judgement is a central component of the many nurse staffing systems implemented in high-income countries to inform workforce planning and staff deployment. Whilst a substantial body of research has evaluated the technical and operational elements of nurse staffing systems, no studies have systematically examined the role of professional judgement and its contribution to decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To explore nurses' use of professional judgement in nurse staffing systems in England and Wales. METHODS: A cross-case comparative design centred on adult in-patient services in three University Health Boards in Wales and three National Health Service Trusts in England. Data generation was undertaken between January 2021 and March 2023 through stakeholder interviews, observations of staffing meetings, and analysis of documents and artefacts. Observations were undertaken in clinical areas but limited to three cases by COVID-19 restrictions. Analysis was informed by translational mobilisation theory. FINDINGS: Two kinds of professional judgement were deployed in the nurse staffing systems: the judgement of clinical nurses and the judgement of senior nurse managers. The research highlighted the reflexive relationship between professional judgement and data, and the circumstances in which organisations placed trust in people and when they placed trust in numbers. Nurses' professional judgement was central to the generation of data, its interpretation and contextualisation. Healthcare organisations relied on the professional judgements of clinical nurses and senior nurse managers in making operational decisions to mitigate risk, where real-world understanding of the status of the organisation was privileged over formal data. Professional judgement had attenuated authority for the purposes of workforce planning, where data was a master actor. Nurses expressed concerns that strategic decision-making prioritised safety and efficiency, and formal measurement systems did not capture important aspects of care quality or staff wellbeing, which made it difficult to articulate their professional judgement. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of staffing systems is resource intensive. Given limited evidence on which to recommend any specific methodology, the priority for future research is to optimise existing systems. If nurses are to deploy their professional judgement to proactively influence the conditions for care, as well as responding to the challenges of risk mitigation, there is a need for robust systems of nursing measurement aligned with agreed standards of care and a vocabulary through which these judgements can be articulated. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Health systems depend on nurses' professional judgement for operational staffing decisions, but data is privileged over professional judgement for workforce planning.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital , Adulto , Humanos , Julgamento , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Medicina Estatal , País de Gales , Recursos Humanos
6.
Med Educ ; 2023 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37655437

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based education (SBE) is crucial to prepare nursing students prior to their clinical learning experience. Theory-based simulation learning is increasingly important for analysing how students learn. This study describes and analyses how nursing students learn through simulation in the context of palliative care communication under a socio-material approach and explores the transfer of their knowledge and skills from simulation to clinical practice. METHODS: Twenty-seven final-year nursing students in six groups participated in two simulated scenarios, followed by a debriefing and post-clinical focus groups to capture their reflections and learning. Fourteen of them joined the post-clinical focus groups after completing their clinical placements. Video recordings of the simulation, and the audio recordings from the debriefing, and post-clinical focus groups were transcribed and coded based on the human and non-human elements that were observed. These were triangulated with data collected through team participant observations, an analysis of the existing syllabi and curriculum, and a participant mapping exercise after the simulation. These various data sources illustrate how student learning and reflections took place. RESULTS: The three themes of student learning derived from the results and analysis were (1) students' expanded learning of health care communication through a socio-material approach in the context of palliative care; 2) students' discovery of the diverse and complex relations and interactions between humans and materials and (3) students' new perspectives on health care communication and the transfer of knowledge and skills through a socio-material approach in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights how SBE can be further expanded using a socio-material approach to prepare students to learn beyond standardised and cognitively driven approaches and procedures. Student learning demonstrates that SBE may develop beyond high fidelity and standardisation to leave room for emergent learning and increased awareness in learning for students and teachers to optimise learning outcomes and competence.

7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 751, 2023 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37443003

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pandemics such as COVID-19 pose threats to the physical safety of healthcare workers and students. They can have traumatic experiences affecting their personal and professional life. Increasing rates of burnout, substance abuse, depression, and suicide among healthcare workers have already been identified, thus making mental health and psychological wellbeing of the healthcare workers a major issue. The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize the characteristics of emotional support programs and interventions targeted to healthcare workers and students since the onset of COVID-19 and other SARS-CoV pandemics and to describe the effectiveness and experiences of these programs. METHOD: This was a mixed method systematic review. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and the review was registered on PROSPERO [CRD42021262837]. Searches were conducted using Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases. The COVIDENCE systematic review management system was used for data selection and extraction by two independent reviewers. The JBI (Joanna Briggs Institute) critical appraisal tools were used to assess the quality of selected studies by two additional reviewers. Finally, data extraction and narrative analysis were conducted. RESULTS: The search retrieved 3161 results including 1061 duplicates. After screening, a total of 19 articles were included in this review. Participants in studies were nurses, physicians, other hospital staff, and undergraduate medical students mostly working on the front-line with COVID-19 patients. Publications included RCTs (n = 4), quasi-experimental studies (n = 2), cross-sectional studies (n = 6), qualitative interview studies (n = 3), and systematic reviews (n = 4). Most (63.4%) of the interventions used online or digital solutions. Interventions mostly showed good effectiveness (support-seeking, positive emotions, reduction of distress symptoms etc.) and acceptance and were experienced as helpful, but there were some conflicting results. CONCLUSION: Healthcare organizations have developed support strategies focusing on providing emotional support for these healthcare workers and students, but it is difficult to conclude whether one program offers distinct benefit compared to the others. More research is needed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of emotional support interventions for health workers.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Coronavírus Relacionado à Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Pessoal de Saúde , Adaptação Psicológica , Estudantes
8.
Health Soc Care Deliv Res ; 11(6): 1-130, 2023 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37469292

RESUMO

Background: Interorganisational collaboration is currently being promoted to improve the performance of NHS providers. However, up to now, there has, to the best of our knowledge, been no systematic attempt to assess the effect of different approaches to collaboration or to understand the mechanisms through which interorganisational collaborations can work in particular contexts. Objectives: Our objectives were to (1) explore the main strands of the literature about interorganisational collaboration and to identify the main theoretical and conceptual frameworks, (2) assess the empirical evidence with regard to how different interorganisational collaborations may (or may not) lead to improved performance and outcomes, (3) understand and learn from NHS evidence users and other stakeholders about how and where interorganisational collaborations can best be used to support turnaround processes, (4) develop a typology of interorganisational collaboration that considers different types and scales of collaboration appropriate to NHS provider contexts and (5) generate evidence-informed practical guidance for NHS providers, policy-makers and others with responsibility for implementing and assessing interorganisational collaboration arrangements. Design: A realist synthesis was carried out to develop, test and refine theories about how interorganisational collaborations work, for whom and in what circumstances. Data sources: Data sources were gathered from peer-reviewed and grey literature, realist interviews with 34 stakeholders and a focus group with patient and public representatives. Review methods: Initial theories and ideas were gathered from scoping reviews that were gleaned and refined through a realist review of the literature. A range of stakeholder interviews and a focus group sought to further refine understandings of what works, for whom and in what circumstances with regard to high-performing interorganisational collaborations. Results: A realist review and synthesis identified key mechanisms, such as trust, faith, confidence and risk tolerance, within the functioning of effective interorganisational collaborations. A stakeholder analysis refined this understanding and, in addition, developed a new programme theory of collaborative performance, with mechanisms related to cultural efficacy, organisational efficiency and technological effectiveness. A series of translatable tools, including a diagnostic survey and a collaboration maturity index, were also developed. Limitations: The breadth of interorganisational collaboration arrangements included made it difficult to make specific recommendations for individual interorganisational collaboration types. The stakeholder analysis focused exclusively on England, UK, where the COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges for fieldwork. Conclusions: Implementing successful interorganisational collaborations is a difficult, complex task that requires significant time, resource and energy to achieve the collaborative functioning that generates performance improvements. A delicate balance of building trust, instilling faith and maintaining confidence is required for high-performing interorganisational collaborations to flourish. Future work: Future research should further refine our theory by incorporating other workforce and user perspectives. Research into digital platforms for interorganisational collaborations and outcome measurement are advocated, along with place-based and cross-sectoral partnerships, as well as regulatory models for overseeing interorganisational collaborations. Study registration: The study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42019149009. Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Health and Social Care Delivery Research programme and will be published in full in Health and Social Care Delivery Research; Vol. 11, No. 6. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.


How can the collaboration between health-care providers be improved? There are continuing concerns about poor patient care across the NHS. One of the ways in which governments have tried to solve these issues is by getting services to work together, rather than separately, to solve any problems. The aim of our review is to learn about how, why and when different approaches to working together ­ which we call interorganisational collaboration ­ can be used to improve the performance of NHS providers. We reviewed published evidence and carried out interviews with NHS staff. We also carried out interviews and a focus group with patient and public representatives. Our review finds that interorganisational collaborations can work well when a series of elements are in place, which includes the need to build trust between everyone involved. Having a belief in the collaboration is also needed to help inspire others to get involved. To try and reduce possible problems, setting priorities and having clear methods to show how improvements can be achieved are important, as well as having an agreed contract in place to ensure that any conflicts are resolved. If done well, collaboration can improve resource allocation, coordination, communication and shared learning about best practice. Our review provides valuable evidence of how different approaches to interorganisational collaboration can be used by NHS providers to work together to improve services in different situations. Our review provides different options for organisations to reflect on how well they are collaborating, which includes the involvement of key stakeholders, such as patients, the public and communities.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Humanos , Pandemias , Pessoal de Saúde , Academias e Institutos , Pessoal Administrativo
9.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286207, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37343030

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, concern has been raised about suicide risk among healthcare workers (HCWs). We investigated the incidence risk and prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviour (STB), and their relationship with occupational risk factors, among National Health Service HCWs in England between April 2020 and August 2021. METHODS: In this longitudinal study, we analysed online survey data completed by 22,501 HCWs from 17 NHS Trusts at baseline (Time 1) and six months (Time 2). The primary outcome measures were suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and non-suicidal self-injury. We used logistic regression to investigate the relationship between these outcomes and demographic characteristics and occupational factors. Results were stratified by occupational role (clinical/non-clinical). RESULTS: Time 1 and Time 2 surveys were completed by 12,514 and 7,160 HCWs, respectively. At baseline, 10.8% (95% CI = 10.1%, 11.6%) of participants reported having experienced suicidal thoughts in the previous two months, whilst 2.1% (95% CI = 1.8%, 2.5%) of participants reported having attempted suicide over the same period. Among HCWs who had not experienced suicidal thoughts at baseline (and who completed the Time 2 survey), 11.3% (95%CI = 10.4%, 12.3%) reported such thoughts six months later. Six months after baseline, 3.9% (95% CI = 3.4%, 4.4%) of HCWs reported attempting suicide for the first time. Exposure to potentially morally injurious events, lack of confidence about raising safety concerns and these concerns being addressed, feeling unsupported by managers, and providing a reduced standard of care were all associated with increased suicidal ideation among HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic. At six months, among clinicians, a lack of confidence about safety concerns being addressed, independently predicted suicidal ideation. CONCLUSION: Suicidal thoughts and behaviour among healthcare workers could be reduced by improving managerial support and enhancing the ability of staff to raise safety concerns.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Ideação Suicida , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Pandemias , Medicina Estatal , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
10.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(10): 3809-3823, 2023 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37232468

RESUMO

AIM: To explore the challenges and opportunities facing executive nurse directors in the UK and identify factors to strengthen their role and support more effective nurse leadership. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study using reflexive thematic analysis. METHODS: Semi-structured, telephone interviews were carried out with 15 nurse directors and 9 nominated colleagues. RESULTS: Participants described a uniquely complex role with a broader scope than any other executive board member. Seven themes were identified: preparation for the role, length of time in role, role expectations, managing complexity, status, being political and influencing. Strengthening factors included successful working relationships with other board colleagues, development of political skills and personal status, coaching and mentoring, working within a supportive team culture and having strong professional networks. CONCLUSION: Executive nurse leaders are key to the transmission of nursing values and the delivery of safety and quality in healthcare settings. To strengthen this role, the limiting factors and the recommended shared learning identified here should be recognized and addressed at an individual, organizational and professional level. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROFESSION AND PATIENT CARE: Given the pressure on all health systems to retain nurses, the role of executive nurse leaders needs to be seen as an important source of professional leadership and their value in actioning health policy into practice recognized. IMPACT: New insights have been provided into the executive nurse director role across the UK. Findings have demonstrated challenges and opportunities to strengthen the executive nurse director role. These include recognition of the need for support, preparation, networking and more realistic expectations of this unique nursing role. REPORTING METHOD: The study adhered to the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: There was no patient or public contribution.


Assuntos
Tutoria , Enfermeiras Administradoras , Humanos , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Liderança
11.
J Health Psychol ; 28(9): 818-831, 2023 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36597919

RESUMO

Staff in the National Health Service (NHS) are under considerable strain, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic; whilst NHS Trusts provide a variety of health and wellbeing support services, there has been little research investigating staff perceptions of these services. We interviewed 48 healthcare workers from 18 NHS Trusts in England about their experiences of workplace health and wellbeing support during the pandemic. Reflexive thematic analysis identified that perceived stigma around help-seeking, and staffing shortages due to wider socio-political contexts such as austerity, were barriers to using support services. Visible, caring leadership at all levels (CEO to line managers), peer support, easily accessible services, and clear communication about support offers were enablers. Our evidence suggests Trusts should have active strategies to improve help-seeking, such as manager training and peer support facilitated by building in time for this during working hours, but this will require long-term strategic planning to address workforce shortages.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Saúde Mental , Humanos , Medicina Estatal , Pandemias , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia
12.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(3): 1003-1017, 2023 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35467757

RESUMO

AIMS: To identify strategies used by registered nurses and non-registered nursing care staff in overcoming barriers when providing fundamental nursing care for non-invasively ventilated inpatients with COVID-19. DESIGN: Online survey with open-ended questions to collect qualitative data. METHODS: In August 2020, we asked UK-based nursing staff to describe any strategies they employed to overcome barriers to delivering care in 15 fundamental nursing care categories when providing care to non-invasively ventilated patients with COVID-19. We analysed data using Framework Analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1062 nurses consented to participate in our survey. We derived four themes. 1) Communication behaviours included adapting verbal and non-verbal communication with patients, using information technology to enable patients' significant others to communicate with staff and patients, and establishing clear information-sharing methods with other staff. 2) Organizing care required clustering interventions, carefully managing supplies, encouraging patient self-care and using 'runners' and interdisciplinary input. 3) Addressing patients' well-being and values required spending time with patients, acting in loco familiae, providing access to psychological and spiritual support, obtaining information about patients' wishes early on and providing privacy and comforting/meaningful items. 4) Management and leadership behaviours included training, timely provision of pandemic information, psychological support, team huddles and facilitating regular breaks. CONCLUSIONS: Our respondents identified multiple strategies in four main areas of clinical practice. Management and leadership are crucial to both fundamental care delivery and the well-being of nurses during pandemics. Grouping strategies into these areas of action may assist nurses and leaders to prepare for pandemic nursing. IMPACT: As these strategies are unlikely to be exclusive to the COVID-19 pandemic, their global dissemination may improve patient experience and help nurses deliver fundamental care when planning pandemic nursing. However, their effectiveness is unknown. Therefore, we are currently evaluating these strategies in a cluster randomized controlled trial.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Cuidados de Enfermagem , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemias , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
J Cancer Surviv ; 17(1): 254-277, 2023 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33710510

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) can result in functional difficulties. Pharmacological interventions used to prevent CIPN either show low efficacy or lack evidence to support their use and to date, duloxetine remains the only recommended treatment for painful CIPN. Non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise and behavioural interventions for CIPN exist. PURPOSE: The aims were to (1) identify and appraise evidence on existing behavioural and exercise interventions focussed on preventing or managing CIPN symptoms, (2) describe psychological mechanisms of action by which interventions influenced CIPN symptoms, (3) determine the underpinning conceptual models that describe how an intervention may create behaviour change, (4) identify treatment components of each intervention and contextual factors, (5) determine the nature and extent of patient and clinician involvement in developing existing interventions and (6) summarise the relative efficacy or effectiveness of interventions to lessen CIPN symptoms and to improve quality of life, balance and muscle strength. METHODS: A systematic search of Ovid Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health Management Information Consortium, Global Health and CINAHL was performed to identify articles published between January 2000 to May 2020, followed by OpenGrey search and hand-searching of relevant journals. Studies that explored behavioural and/or exercise interventions designed to prevent or improve symptoms of CIPN in adults who had received or were receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy for any type of cancer, irrespective of when delivered within the cancer pathway were included. RESULTS: Nineteen randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies which explored behavioural (n=6) and exercise (n=13) interventions were included. Four studies were rated as methodologically strong, ten were moderate and five were weak. Ten exercise and two behavioural interventions, including those that improved CIPN knowledge and self-management resources and facilitated symptom self-reporting, led to reduced CIPN symptoms during and/or after chemotherapy treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The extent of potential benefits from the interventions was difficult to judge, due to study limitations. Future interventions should incorporate a clear theoretical framework and involve patients and clinicians in the development process. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Our findings show exercise interventions have beneficial effects on CIPN symptoms although higher quality research is warranted. Behavioural interventions that increase patient's CIPN knowledge, improve self-management capacity and enable timely access to symptom management led to reduced CIPN symptoms.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos , Sobreviventes de Câncer , Neoplasias , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico , Adulto , Humanos , Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Qualidade de Vida , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/induzido quimicamente , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico , Terapia por Exercício
14.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 32(5): 254-263, 2023 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36167797

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of nursing team size and composition on inpatient hospital mortality. DESIGN: A retrospective longitudinal study using linked nursing staff rostering and patient data. Multilevel conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for patient characteristics, day and time-invariant ward differences estimated the association between inpatient mortality and staffing at the ward-day level. Two staffing measures were constructed: the fraction of target hours worked (fill-rate) and the absolute difference from target hours. SETTING: Three hospitals within a single National Health Service Trust in England. PARTICIPANTS: 19 287 ward-day observations with information on 4498 nurses and 66 923 hospital admissions in 53 inpatient hospital wards for acutely ill adult patients for calendar year 2017. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: In-hospital deaths. RESULTS: A statistically significant association between the fill-rate for registered nurses (RNs) and inpatient mortality (OR 0.9883, 95% CI 0.9773 to 0.9996, p=0.0416) was found only for RNs hospital employees. There was no association for healthcare support workers (HCSWs) or agency workers. On average, an extra 12-hour shift by an RN was associated with a reduction in the odds of a patient death of 9.6% (OR 0.9044, 95% CI 0.8219 to 0.9966, p=0.0416). An additional senior RN (in NHS pay band 7 or 8) had 2.2 times the impact of an additional band 5 RN (fill-rate for bands 7 and 8: OR 0.9760, 95% CI 0.9551 to 0.9973, p=0.0275; band 5: OR 0.9893, 95% CI 0.9771 to 1.0017, p=0.0907). CONCLUSIONS: RN staffing and seniority levels were associated with patient mortality. The lack of association for HCSWs and agency nurses indicates they are not effective substitutes for RNs who regularly work on the ward.


Assuntos
Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital , Medicina Estatal , Adulto , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estudos Longitudinais , Pacientes Internados , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Recursos Humanos
15.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1474, 2022 Dec 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36463187

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medication errors regardless of the degree of patient harm can have a negative emotional impact on the healthcare staff involved. The potential for self-victimization of healthcare staff following medication errors can add to the moral distress of healthcare staff. The stigma associated with errors and their disclosure often haunts healthcare professionals, leading them to question their own professional competence. This paper investigates the negative emotions expressed by healthcare staff in their reported medication administration error incidents along with the immediate responses they received from their seniors and colleagues after the incident. METHOD: This is a retrospective study using a qualitative descriptive design and text mining. This study includes free-text descriptions of medication administration error incidents (n = 72,390) reported to National Reporting & Learning System in 2016 from England and Wales. Text-mining by SAS text miner and content analysis was used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Analysis of data led to the extraction of 93 initial codes and two categories i.e., 1) negative emotions expressed by healthcare staff which included 4 sub-categories of feelings: (i) fear; (ii) disturbed; (iii) sadness; (iv) guilt and 2) Immediate response from seniors and colleagues which included 2 sub-categories: (i) Reassurance and support and (ii) Guidance on what to do after an error. CONCLUSION: Negative emotions expressed by healthcare staff when reporting medication errors could be a catalyst for learning and system change. However, negative emotions when internalized as fear, guilt, or self-blame, could have a negative impact on the mental health of individuals concerned, reporting culture, and opportunities for learning from the error. Findings from this study, hence, call for future research to investigate the impact of negative emotions on healthcare staff well-being and identify ways to mitigate these in practice.


Assuntos
Mineração de Dados , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Emoções , Atenção à Saúde
16.
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1126, 2022 Sep 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36068564

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Resilient Healthcare research centres on understanding and improving quality and safety in healthcare. The Concepts for Applying Resilience Engineering (CARE) model highlights the relationships between demand, capacity, work-as-done, work-as-imagined, and outcomes, all of which are central aspects of Resilient Healthcare theory. However, detailed descriptions of the nature of misalignments and the mechanisms used to adapt to them are still unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objectives were to identify and classify types of misalignments between demand and capacity and types of adaptations that were made in response to misalignments. METHODS: The study involved 88.5 hours of non-participant ethnographic observations in a large, teaching hospital in central London. The wards included in the study were: two surgical wards, an older adult ward, a critical care unit, and the Acute Assessment Unit (AAU), an extension unit created to expedite patient flow out of the Emergency Department. Data were collected via observations of routine clinical work and ethnographic interviews with healthcare professionals during the observations. Field notes were transcribed and thematically analysed using a combined deductive-inductive approach based on the CARE model. RESULTS: A total of 365 instances of demand-capacity misalignment were identified across the five wards included in the study. Of these, 212 had at least one observed corresponding work adaptation. Misalignments identified include equipment, staffing, process, communication, workflow, and space. Adaptations identified include process, resource redistribution, and extra-role performance. For all misalignment types observed across the five in-patient settings, process adaptations were the most frequently used adaptations. The exception to this was for staffing misalignments, which were most frequently responded to with extra-role performance adaptations. Of the three process adaptations, hospital workers most often adapted by changing how the process was done. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes a new version of the CARE model that includes types of misalignments and corresponding adaptations, which can be used to better understand work-as-done. This affords insight into the complexity of the system and how it might be improved by reducing misalignments via work system redesign or by enhancing adaptive capacity.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Atenção à Saúde , Idoso , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Hospitais , Humanos , Recursos Humanos em Hospital
18.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(6): e13671, 2022 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35959639

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to co-design an evidence- and theory-based behavioural intervention to reduce the impact of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms on patients' quality of life. METHODS: Guided by the Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions, our intervention development process was guided by (a) findings of systematic reviews, (b) inductive analysis of 39 h of observational fieldwork, 12 patient and 11 clinician interviews, (c) deductive analysis using the Common-Sense Model to develop a Self-Regulation Model of CIPN and (d) 17 patients and 18 clinicians co-designing the intervention. RESULTS: CIPN perception and coping behaviours were highlighted as processes to target when co-designing an intervention. The processes targeted in our intervention are CIPN perception and coping behaviours, namely, (a) self-monitoring of symptoms, (b) communicating and early reporting of symptoms to clinicians, (c) participating in making chemotherapy dose reduction decisions with their clinicians and (d) engaging in self-management and safety strategies to reduce impact of CIPN symptoms. To address these, a behavioural intervention was deemed suitable. CONCLUSION: We developed a self-regulation model of CIPN and a logic model for documenting the proposed mechanism of action of our co-designed behavioural intervention for reducing impact of CIPN symptoms.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida , Antineoplásicos/efeitos adversos , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/induzido quimicamente , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/terapia
19.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e059159, 2022 07 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35902190

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The increasing burden of mental distress reported by healthcare professionals is a matter of serious concern and there is a growing recognition of the role of the workplace in creating this problem. Magnet hospitals, a model shown to attract and retain staff in US research, creates positive work environments that aim to support the well-being of healthcare professionals. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Magnet4Europe is a cluster randomised controlled trial, with wait list controls, designed to evaluate the effects of organisational redesign, based on the Magnet model, on nurses' and physicians' well-being in general acute care hospitals, using a multicomponent implementation strategy. The study will be conducted in more than 60 general acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Germany, Ireland, Norway and Sweden. The primary outcome is burnout among nurses and physicians, assessed in longitudinal surveys of nurses and physicians at participating hospitals. Additional data will be collected from them on perceived work environments, patient safety and patient quality of care and will be triangulated with data from medical records, including case mix-adjusted in-hospital mortality. The process of implementation will be evaluated using qualitative data from focus group and key informant interviews. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the Ethics Committee Research UZ/KU Leuven, Belgium; additionally, ethics approval is obtained in all other participating countries either through a central or decentral authority. Findings will be disseminated at conferences, through peer-reviewed manuscripts and via social media. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN10196901.


Assuntos
Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Médicos , Hospitais , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Local de Trabalho
20.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 2093-2102, 2022 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35506434

RESUMO

AIMS: The aim of this study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Culture of Care Barometer in health care organizations. BACKGROUND: There is a lack of tools to gauge the caring culture in Chinese hospitals. The Culture of Care Barometer is a psychometrically sound measure for caring culture developed in Western settings. METHODS: This study was guided by Sousa and Rojjanasrira's methodological approach. A total of 2365 staff were recruited from two tertiary hospitals. The Barometer was administered with the Hospital Culture Evaluation Index and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS: The content validity index was calculated as 0.99. The goodness-of-fit indices, apart from the model chi-square, which was statistically significant, all exceeded established thresholds for adequate fit. The internal consistency was very satisfactory. Pearson's correlation indicated that the tool has good concurrent and convergent validity. CONCLUSIONS: The Barometer is a reliable and valid instrument to assess front-line staff perspectives on a caring culture in Chinese hospitals. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nursing managers can use the Barometer to gauge the caring culture in China. Tailored interventions can be designed to address specific domains, and additional support can be provided to more vulnerable departments or staff groups.


Assuntos
Hospitais , China , Humanos , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Inquéritos e Questionários
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