Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 10.397
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0279724, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36602987

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Child dietary diversity is very low across rural communities in Bihar. Based on the experience of behavior change communication (BCC) module roll out in self-help group (SHG) sessions in rural Bihar, this study aims to assess the impact of the intervention on child dietary diversity levels in the beneficiary groups. METHODS: The study is based on a pre-post study design whereby child dietary diversity is examined for a sample of 300 children (6-23 months old from 60 village organizations) during both pre-intervention as well as post-intervention phase. The latter consists of two types of group viz. a) children whose mothers were directly exposed to BCC module in SHGs sessions and b) those who were non-participants but may have indirect exposure through spillovers of BCC activities. Econometric analysis including logistic regression as well as propensity score matching techniques are applied for estimating the changes in dietary diversity in the post-intervention phase. RESULTS: During the pre-intervention phase, 19% of the children (6-23 months) had adequate dietary diversity (eating from at least 4 out of 7 different food groups) and this increased to 49% among the exposed group and to 28% among the non-exposed group in the post-intervention phase. The exposed group have an odds ratio of 3.81 (95% CI: 2.03, 7.15) for consuming diverse diet when compared to the pre-intervention group. The propensity score matching analysis finds a 33% average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) for the group participating in BCC sessions at SHG events. CONCLUSION: BCC roll out among SHG members is an effective mode to increase dietary diversity among infants and young children. The impact on child dietary diversity was significantly higher among mothers directly exposed to BCC modules. The BCC module also improved knowledge and awareness levels on complementary feeding and child dietary diversity.


Assuntos
Dieta , População Rural , Humanos , Lactente , Comunicação , Comportamento Alimentar , Fenômenos Fisiológicos da Nutrição do Lactente , Grupos de Autoajuda
2.
Bull World Health Organ ; 101(1): 28-35A, 2023 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36593787

RESUMO

Objective: To assess treatment outcomes in tuberculosis patients participating in support group meetings in five districts of Karnataka and Telangana states in southern India. Methods: Tuberculosis patients from five selected districts who began treatment in 2019 were offered regular monthly support group meetings, with a focus on patients in urban slum areas with risk factors for adverse outcomes. We tracked the patients' participation in these meetings and extracted treatment outcomes from the Nikshay national tuberculosis database for the same patients in 2021. We compared treatment outcomes based on attendance of the support groups meetings. Findings: Of 30 706 tuberculosis patients who started treatment in 2019, 3651 (11.9%) attended support groups meetings. Of patients who attended at least one support meeting, 94.1% (3426/3639) had successful treatment outcomes versus 88.2% (23 745/26 922) of patients who did not attend meetings (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 2.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 2.10-2.82). The odds of successful treatment outcomes were higher in meeting participants than non-participants for all variables examined including: age ≥ 60 years (aOR: 3.19; 95% CI: 2.26-4.51); female sex (aOR: 3.33; 95% CI: 2.46-4.50); diabetes comorbidity (aOR: 3.03; 95% CI: 1.91-4.81); human immunodeficiency virus infection (aOR: 3.73; 95% CI: 1.76-7.93); tuberculosis retreatment (aOR: 1.69; 1.22-2.33); and drug-resistant tuberculosis (aOR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.21-3.09). Conclusion: Participation in support groups for tuberculosis patients was significantly associated with successful tuberculosis treatment outcomes, especially among high-risk groups. Expanding access to support groups could improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes at the population level.


Assuntos
Tuberculose , Humanos , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Índia/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Fatores de Risco , Grupos de Autoajuda
3.
Addict Behav ; 139: 107577, 2023 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36528964

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted rapid, reflexive transition from face-to-face to online healthcare. For group-based addiction services, evidence for the impact on service delivery and participant experience is limited. METHODS: A 12-month (plus 2-month follow-up) pragmatic evaluation of the upscaling of online mutual-help groups by SMART Recovery Australia (SRAU) was conducted using The Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Data captured by SRAU between 1st July 2020 and 31st August 2021 included participant questionnaires, Zoom Data Analytics and administrative logs. RESULTS: Reach: The number of online groups increased from just 6 pre-COVID-19 to 132. These groups were delivered on 2786 (M = 232.16, SD = 42.34 per month) occasions, to 41,752 (M = 3479.33, SD = 576.34) attendees. EFFECTIVENESS: Participants (n = 1052) reported finding the online group meetings highly engaging and a positive, recovery supportive experience. 91 % of people with experience of face-to-face group meetings rated their online experience as equivalent or better. Adoption: Eleven services (including SRAU) and five volunteers delivered group meetings for the entire 12-months. IMPLEMENTATION: SRAU surpassed their goal of establishing 100 groups. Maintenance: The average number of meetings delivered [t(11.14) = -1.45, p = 0.1737] and attendees [t(1.95) = -3.28, p = 0.1880] per month were maintained across a two-month follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: SRAU scaled-up the delivery of online mutual-help groups in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings support the accessibility, acceptability and sustainability of delivering SMART Recovery mutual-help groups online. Not only are these findings important in light of the global pandemic and public safety, but they demonstrate the potential for reaching and supporting difficult and under-served populations.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Humanos , Pandemias , Grupos de Autoajuda , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/terapia , Atenção à Saúde
4.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 26(1): 57-64, 2023 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36520602

RESUMO

Online support groups (OSGs) provide caregivers of children with mental disorders, information, and advice, as well as the opportunity to exchange social support. This research explores the effects of social support on caregivers when they participate in OSGs. The research survey was conducted on OSGs for parents of children with mental disorders, including developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This study collected 204 questionnaires from caregivers for analysis. The results found that informational support and tangible support positively affect members' self-efficacy (SEF), while offering esteem support, emotional support, and companionship support, influencing positive affect (PA). Both SEF and PA improve with members' knowledge-sharing intentions and subjective well-being. In addition, PA impacts the release of stress and recovery from self-stigma. This study provides insights into members' behavior toward support groups. The findings also provide preliminary guidelines for health professionals in adopting strategies to support caregivers.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista , Criança , Humanos , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/psicologia , Cuidadores/psicologia , Apoio Social , Grupos de Autoajuda , Rede Social
5.
Nurs Adm Q ; 47(1): 31-40, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36469372

RESUMO

Retention and burnout have always been a challenge for nurse leaders, but the pandemic brought these concerns to a whole new level. And now the Great Resignation is affecting health care. So how can nurse leaders at hospitals and health care systems create a supportive environment for staff during a public health emergency? Structured support groups are a viable option for emphasizing self-care and wellness. We explain why we decided to form a structured support group for our intensive care unit nurses and illustrate the results from our clinical research team. In addition, we share feedback we received from participating nurses and offer advice on forming a structured support group in acute care settings. This strategy resulted in a change in the participant's behaviors after attending the structured emotional support group. This finding aligns with the literature, which supports strategies to protect nurses' mental well-being and to take preventive measures in critical situations. Using this as a foundation, a structured emotional support group can change nurse engagement and involvement in their process and practice, during times of crisis. Many other benefits could be realized from this strategy such as improved nursing practice and processes, improved nurse satisfaction, and improved recruitment and retention.


Assuntos
Esgotamento Profissional , COVID-19 , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital , Humanos , Pandemias , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Reorganização de Recursos Humanos , Esgotamento Profissional/prevenção & controle , Grupos de Autoajuda , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital/psicologia , Satisfação no Emprego
6.
Br J Community Nurs ; 27(Sup12): S36-S38, 2022 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36519487
8.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(1): 7, 2022 Dec 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36512095

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study aims to assess whether cancer-specific knowledge (CSK) is associated with membership in a cancer peer support group (PSG) and other factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study investigated the CSK of 1121 cancer patients of various entities across Germany. CSK was measured with the BCKS-14, a 14-item knowledge instrument which was previously participatory developed with patient representatives and oncologists. Associations between CSK and PSG membership, sociodemographic factors, internet use, and preferences in medical decision-making were analysed with t-tests and multiple linear regressions. RESULTS: The t-test showed a statistically significant difference in CSK between members and non-members of PSGs. Knowledge for PSG members was on average 0.97 points higher (p < 0.001) and varied between 2 and 14 points compared to 0-14 points for non-members. Regression analysis revealed age, gender, time since diagnosis, education, internet use, and PSG activity to be statistically significant predictors. Younger (ß = - 0.15; p < 0.001), female (ß = 0.10; p = 0.001), higher educated patients (ß = 0.27; p < 0.001) with and a diagnosis longer ago (ß = 0.10; p = 0.002) who use the internet frequently for information seeking (ß = 0.20; p ≤ 0.001) and members of cancer PSGs (ß = 0.18; p ≤ 0.001) showed a higher CSK. CONCLUSION: Overall, CSK of the participants shows a high degree of variance. CSK should be promoted for all patients and especially for older, newly diagnosed patients with low educational levels and PSGs introduced early on as they contribute to improving CSK among other benefits.


Assuntos
Neoplasias , Grupos de Autoajuda , Humanos , Feminino , Estudos Transversais , Alemanha , Grupo Associado , Neoplasias/terapia
9.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(11)2022 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36384950

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: With less than 20% of people with hypertension achieving their target blood pressure (BP) goals, uncontrolled hypertension remains a major public health problem in India. We conducted a study to assess the effectiveness of a community-based education and peer support programme led by women's self-help group (SHG) members in reducing the mean systolic BP among people with hypertension in urban slums of Kochi city, Kerala, India. METHODS: A cluster randomised controlled pragmatic trial was conducted where 20 slums were randomised to either the intervention or the control arms. In each slum, participants who had elevated BP (>140/90) or were on antihypertensive medications were recruited. The intervention was delivered through women's SHG members (1 per 20-30 households) who provided (1) assistance in daily hypertension management, (2) social and emotional support to encourage healthy behaviours and (3) referral to the primary healthcare system. Those in the control arm received standard of care. The primary outcome was change in mean systolic BP (SBP) after 6 months. RESULTS: A total of 1952 participants were recruited-968 in the intervention arm and 984 in the control arm. Mean SBP was reduced by 6.26 mm Hg (SE 0.69) in the intervention arm compared with 2.16 mm Hg (SE 0.70) in the control arm; the net difference being 4.09 (95% CI 2.15 to 4.09), p<0.001. CONCLUSION: This women's SHG members led community intervention was effective in reducing SBP among people with hypertension compared with those who received usual care, over 6 months in urban slums of Kerala, India. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CTRI/2019/12/022252.


Assuntos
Hipertensão , Áreas de Pobreza , Humanos , Feminino , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/terapia , Índia , Pressão Sanguínea/fisiologia , Grupos de Autoajuda
11.
Elife ; 112022 11 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36317963

RESUMO

Humans are social animals who engage in a variety of collective activities requiring coordinated action. Among these, music is a defining and ancient aspect of human sociality. Human social interaction has largely been addressed in dyadic paradigms, and it is yet to be determined whether the ensuing conclusions generalize to larger groups. Studied more extensively in non-human animal behavior, the presence of multiple agents engaged in the same task space creates different constraints and possibilities than in simpler dyadic interactions. We addressed whether collective dynamics play a role in human circle drumming. The task was to synchronize in a group with an initial reference pattern and then maintain synchronization after it was muted. We varied the number of drummers from solo to dyad, quartet, and octet. The observed lower variability, lack of speeding up, smoother individual dynamics, and leader-less inter-personal coordination indicated that stability increased as group size increased, a sort of temporal wisdom of crowds. We propose a hybrid continuous-discrete Kuramoto model for emergent group synchronization with a pulse-based coupling that exhibits a mean field positive feedback loop. This research suggests that collective phenomena are among the factors that play a role in social cognition.


Assuntos
Música , Animais , Comportamento Social , Relações Interpessoais , Comportamento Animal , Grupos de Autoajuda
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36361387

RESUMO

There is a lack of support for mental health professionals who experience a patient suicide or homicide. This is despite a high likelihood of such an occurrence and the heavy professional and personal toll the experience can take. We conducted 15 interviews with members of a facilitated peer support group run for consultant psychiatrists who have experienced a patient homicide or suicide. Our interviews explored the trauma of the experience as well as the effectiveness of the group in helping the clinician heal. Our results echoed previous research that the experience can be profoundly traumatic. A professionally facilitated, consultant-only peer group specifically dedicated to suicide and homicide were the key components helping participants to process their grief. Mental health trusts should consider setting up facilitated peer support groups for clinicians who experience patient suicide or homicide.


Assuntos
Luto , Psiquiatria , Suicídio , Humanos , Homicídio , Suicídio/psicologia , Grupos de Autoajuda , Grupo Associado
13.
Open Heart ; 9(2)2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36252993

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) experience anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life (QoL). OBJECTIVES: This mixed-methods systematic review evaluates whether ICD support groups have a beneficial effect on mental well-being. METHODS: Literature searches were carried out in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Eligible studies investigated patient-led support groups for ICD patients aged 18 years or older, using any quantitative or qualitative design. The Mixed-Methods Assessment Tool was used to assess quality. Meta-analysis of measures of mental well-being was conducted. Thematic synthesis was used to generate analytic themes from the qualitative data. The data were integrated and presented using the Pillar Integration Process. RESULTS: Ten studies were included in this review. All studies bar one were non-randomised or had a qualitative design and patients had self-selected to attend a support group. Five contributed to the quantitative data synthesis and seven to the qualitative synthesis. Meta-analysis of anxiety and QoL measures showed no significant impact of support groups on mental well-being, but qualitative data showed that patients perceived benefit from attendance through sharing experiences and acceptance of life with an ICD. DISCUSSION: ICD support group attendance improved the patients' perceived well-being. Attendees value the opportunity to share their experiences which helps to accept their new life with an ICD. Future research could consider outcomes such as patient acceptance and the role of healthcare professionals at support groups.


Assuntos
Desfibriladores Implantáveis , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Qualidade de Vida , Grupos de Autoajuda
14.
Cad Saude Publica ; 38(9): e00007922, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36287396

RESUMO

Self-help groups (SHGs) for people living with HIV (PLHIV) are organizations created by the community to provide individuals with security, affection, improved self-esteem, and a sense of belonging. However, SHGs have also been used by the government to help implement HIV control policies. This study aimed to identify the characteristics associated with the use of SHGs by PLHIV and the routes and displacement patterns adopted by users. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted based on data collected in six Central American countries during 2012. Using a list of SHGs, a random sampling was conducted in two stages. Firstly, the SHGs were selected. Then, the selected SHGs were visited and every third user who attended the SHG was surveyed. Logistic regression models were used to identify the characteristics associated with the use of SHGs and with attending the nearest SHGs. A spatial analysis was performed to identify the routes followed by users to reach the SHGs from their home communities. We found that the characteristics significantly associated with higher odds of SHG usage were country of residence and schooling level. The average and median distances traveled by users to attend SHGs were 20 and 5 kilometers, respectively. PLHIV do not use the SHGs closest to their locality, perhaps for fear of stigma and discrimination. We recommend that research on this topic use a mixed qualitative-quantitative methodology to better understand utilization decisions, user expectations, and the degree to which these are being met.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Grupos de Autoajuda , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Brasil , Estigma Social
16.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 17(1): 396, 2022 10 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36307891

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: More people with rare diseases likely receive disease education and emotional and practical support from peer-led support groups than any other way. Most rare-disease support groups are delivered outside of the health care system by untrained leaders. Potential benefits may not be achieved and harms, such as dissemination of inaccurate information, may occur. Our primary objective was to evaluate the effects of a rare-disease support group leader education program, which was developed collaboratively by researchers, peer support group leaders, and patient organization leaders, compared to waitlist control, on peer leader self-efficacy among scleroderma support group leaders. METHODS: The trial was a pragmatic, two-arm partially nested randomised controlled trial with 1:1 allocation into intervention or waitlist control. Eligible participants were existing or candidate peer support group leaders affiliated with a scleroderma patient organization. Leader training was delivered in groups of 5-6 participants weekly for 13 weeks in 60-90 min sessions via the GoToMeeting® videoconferencing platform. The program included 12 general leader training modules and one module specific to scleroderma. Primary outcome was leader self-efficacy, measured by the Support Group Leader Self-efficacy Scale (SGLSS) immediately post-intervention. Secondary outcomes were leader self-efficacy 3 months post-intervention; emotional distress, leader burnout, and volunteer satisfaction post-intervention and 3 months post-intervention; and program satisfaction among intervention participants post-intervention. RESULTS: One hundred forty-eight participants were randomised to intervention (N = 74) or waitlist (N = 74). Primary outcome data were provided by 146 (99%) participants. Mean number of sessions attended was 11.4 (standard deviation = 2.6). Mean program satisfaction score (CSQ-8) was 30.3 (standard deviation = 3.0; possible range 8-32). Compared to waitlist control, leader self-efficacy was higher post-intervention [SGLSS; 16.7 points, 95% CI 11.0-22.3; standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.84] and 3 months later (15.6 points, 95% CI 10.2-21.0; SMD 0.73); leader volunteer satisfaction was significantly higher at both assessments, emotional distress was lower post-intervention but not 3 months later, and leader burnout was not significantly different at either assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Peer support group leader education improved leader self-efficacy substantially. The program could be easily adapted for support group leaders in other rare diseases. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03965780 ; registered on May 29, 2019.


Assuntos
Esclerodermia Localizada , Autoeficácia , Humanos , Doenças Raras , Grupos de Autoajuda , Grupo Associado , Pessoal de Saúde , Qualidade de Vida
17.
Rech Soins Infirm ; 149(2): 31-50, 2022.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36241452

RESUMO

Support groups play an essential role in caring for parents experiencing perinatal death and bereavement. However, there is very little data on the effectiveness of these services on their well-being. To better understand the experience of bereaved parents using support group services, a qualitative systematic review was conducted using Thomas and Harden’s method. Seven databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycARTICLES, Cairn, Érudit, and Repère) were searched in October 2017 with an update in June 2021. A total of 16 studies were included and critically evaluated. The thematic synthesis made it possible to generate four analytical themes to describe parents’ experience according to the notion of spaces. The first theme refers to external space, i.e., the format of the support groups (virtual or face-to-face), and the other three themes reflect internal spaces, i.e., the functions of the groups (support, expression, and learning). This thematic synthesis confirms that participating in support groups benefits bereaved parents. It also offers possible solutions to improve the structure and accessibility of support groups.


Assuntos
Luto , Feminino , Humanos , Pais , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Grupos de Autoajuda
19.
Brasília, D.F.; OPAS; 2022-10-31.
em Português | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-56611

RESUMO

Em todo o mundo, os serviços de saúde mental estão se esforçando para oferecer apoio e atenção de qualidade às pessoas com condições de saúde mental ou deficiências psicossociais. Em muitos países, porém, as pessoas ainda carecem de acesso a serviços de qualidade que atendam às necessidades com respeito aos direitos e à dignidade. Mesmo hoje, as pessoas são submetidas a violações e discriminação de diversos tipos em contextos de atenção à saúde mental, incluindo o uso de práticas coercitivas, condições de vida precárias e desumanas, negligência e, em alguns casos, maus-tratos. Ao destacar serviços de saúde mental ao redor do mundo que adotaram boas práticas, este guia pretende apoiar os países no desenvolvimento e na reforma de serviços e respostas de base comunitária sob a óptica dos direitos humanos, promovendo direitos fundamentais como igualdade, não discriminação, capacidade jurídica, consentimento livre e esclarecido e inclusão social. Este guia pretende lançar luz sobre essa questão urgente e incentivar os formuladores de políticas em todo o mundo a investir em serviços de saúde mental de base comunitária que estejam alinhados com os estândares internacionais dos direitos humanos. Apresenta, ainda, uma visão sobre a atenção à saúde mental dentro dos mais elevados padrões de respeito aos direitos humanos e dá esperança de uma vida melhor a milhões de pessoas com condições de saúde mental e deficiências psicossociais, e a suas famílias.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Grupos de Autoajuda
20.
Health Expect ; 25(6): 3005-3016, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36129136

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peer support is increasingly recognized as crucial for improving health and psychosocial outcomes in oncological care. The integration of cancer self-help groups (SHGs) into cancer care facilities has gained importance in recent years. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge of the extent and quality of cooperation between cancer care facilities and SHGs and their integration into routine care. The concept of self-help friendliness (SHF) provides a feasible instrument for the measurement of cooperation and integration. METHODS: A cross-sectional study across Germany investigates the experiences of 266 leaders of cancer SHGs concerning their cooperation with cancer care facilities based on the criteria for SHF. The participatory study was developed and conducted with representatives of the House of Cancer Self-Help and the federal associations of cancer self-help. RESULTS: According to the SHG leaders, about 80% of their members primarily find their way to an SHG via other patients and only less than 50% more or less frequently via hospitals or rehabilitation clinics. The quality of cooperation with cancer centres, hospitals and rehabilitation clinics, however, is rated as good to very good by more than 70% of the respondents. Nine out of 10 quality criteria for SHF are fully or at least partially implemented, the values vary between 53% and 87%. Overall, 58% of the SHG leaders feel well to be very well integrated into care facilities. CONCLUSIONS: The results show a positive assessment of the involvement of SHGs in oncological care, but differences between inpatient and outpatient care and low referrals to SHGs are prominent. The concept of SHF is a feasible solution for a systematic and measurable involvement of SHGs. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: The perspectives and insight of patient representatives obtained through qualitative interviews were directly incorporated into this study. Representatives of cancer self-help organizations were involved in the development of the questionnaire, reviewed it for content and comprehensibility, and further helped to recruit participants.


Assuntos
Neoplasias , Grupos de Autoajuda , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Alemanha , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários , Neoplasias/terapia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...